Kim's New England Ancestors (and more)

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  • ID: I2518
  • Name: Richard HUNNEWELL
  • Prefix: Captain
  • Given Name: Richard
  • Surname: HUNNEWELL
  • Sex: M
  • _UID: 61C25BED612A004486D1B70EF0BF0EBCCF7B
  • Change Date: 28 JUN 2003
  • Note:
    The following is an excerpt from "Honeywell Heritage," Vol. 2, No. 1.

    Richard, Indian fighter

    "While mowing on the marsh at Greenleaf's Point, Richard Hunnewell spotted the movements of Indians on Blue Point. Separated from them by the river and a considerable body of marsh, he concluded that he was not in danger and placed his gun by a saddle of hay. While mowing at some distance from his gun, an Indian had crossed the river and under its bank crept up through the thatch and secured Richard's gun. Richard, at length seeing his desperate situation, continued his mowing as if he had not discovered the Indian. When the Indian had advanced to within a few yards, Richard suddenly sprang forward with his scythe and roared out at the Indian. Startled, the Indian could not get control of the gun and retreated backwards as Richard advanced.

    The Indian, while in his haste, stepped into a muddy salt pond and fell. Richard swung his scythe, cutting off the Indian's head. He held up the head, brandishing it in view of the other Indians challenging them to come over as he would serve them in the same manner." (History of Saco and Biddeford, Maine, George Folsom, Saco, 1830)

    What caused Richard Hunnewell's hatred of Indians? Tradition has said that his first wife and children were massacred by Indians on the spot where the little red house stands at the forks of the road near Plummer's Neck. Richard, after seeing the vision of his murdered wife, swore an oath of vengeance and "hunted and slew the Indians as if they were wild beasts."

    Richard built a home around 1702 which is still standing along Black Point Road. It is the oldest house in Scarborough, and one of the oldest in Cumberland County, Maine.

    Richard remarried by March 1674 to Elizabeth Stover, daughter of Sylvester and Elizabeth (Norton) Stover of Scarborough. They had four children, Roger, John, Elizabeth, and Patience. I shall reserve the continued story of their children for another time.

    It is Richard's military career that furnishes the greatest of his accomplishments. He was first a farmer, then became a selectman around 1671, and later in 1680 was the constable of Scarborough. The remainder of his life seems to have been spent in the service of the military beginning in the Indian King Philip's War (1675-76).

    The first account of this service is that on October 12, 1676 he was an inhabitant of the historic Black Point Garrison, just prior to its surrender.

    In August, 1677 he was a Corporal and soon gained promotion to Ensign in 1680 while serving under Captain Joshua Scottow. By 1681 he was serving under Sergeant Major Richard Walderne who was under Major Brian Penolton in the York Regiment.

    No further record was found until July 2, 1687 when Richard was commissioned a Lieutenant by New England Governor Sir Edmund Androse. On November 11, 1689 he was ordered to command twenty soldiers at the "Blew Point", Black Point, and Spurwinck Garrisons. During this period, he served under the command of Major Benjamin Church, the well known Indian fighter, who was in command of the forces at the Eastward (Maine).

    In 1690 there were many skirmishes which eventually led to the complete depopulation of the area. In one of these at the Saco River near Winter Harbor, Church wrote in a letter dated September 17, 1690, "At this skirmish Lt. Hunnewell was shot through the thigh." In a letter dated November 27, 1690, Church wrote, "My kind respects to Maj. Frost, Capt. Walton, Lieut. Hunnewell, with due respects to all Gentlemen by friends in the Eastward parts..." On August 7, 1691 Richard, as Lieutenant and "Pilott", was reported as wounded "in the late expedition Eastward."

    Richard was promoted to the rank of Captain on July 24, 1693. In 1696, again with Major Church in the expedition to St. John, the only mention of this being found in the latter's account, which speaks of Captain Hunnewell as "one of the commanders of the forces belonging to the Eastward parts."

    His wounds seem to have been rather serious, as in 1697 he petitioned the General Court that he, "for some time hath been employed in his Majesties and this countries service against the common enemy, in which service he hath been wounded several times in his arm by divers shot, which rendered him incapable of any servile labor whereby to produce a lively hood for himself and poor family with children who are now in great want of necessaries..." He signed this petition by his mark, and was granted ten pounds "for his present relief."

    The Indians at length sought their vengeance against Richard, the "Indian fighter". Perhaps it was inevitable that he came to an end at their hands. " On October 6, 1703 Captain Hunnewell and a detachment of some twenty men, unarmed and without thought of danger, sauntered from the stockade to fetch their cattle or swine and work in their meadows at Black Point. At the southerly end of Massacre Pond a body of some 120-200 savages lay in ambush. In one concerted effort they way-laid and killed the Captain and nineteen of his men. Only one, John Boden, who escaped by flight, survived. The body of the deceased Hunnewell was horribly gashed and mangled. The slain were buried together in a single grave and covered with a high mound of earth. 'The Great Grave' was conspicuous for many years and is noted upon an old map."

    The following is an excerpt from "Honeywell Heritage," Vol. 2, No. 2.

    Massacre Pond

    The site of the massacre of Richard Hunnewell (RI-2) described in the last issue is marked by a stone and plaque at the edge of Prout?s Neck Golf Course on Black Point Road, Scarborough, ME according to former resident S. Gary Hunnewell. It can be found south of a variety store which is opposite the road leading across Massacre Pond to Scarborough Beach. The date on the plaque is incorrectly marked. Richard was killed on 6 Oct 1703 as stated in Roger and Ambrose, by JMH.

    The following is an excerpt from "Honeywell Heritage," Vol. 3, No. 1.

    Queen Anne?s War ends

    But too late for Richard

    The Peace Conference at Portsmouth on July 13, 1713 ended Queen Anne?s War, eleven years of conflict between the Indians and the English settlers. During the War, "Scarborough was a rendezvous for the savages," according to Indian Wars of New England, p. 160.

    Dick Hunniwell (Richard Hunnewell), "the Indian-killer," was implacable in his hatred of the Indians. While on one of their forays against the Scarborough settlers the Indians had gone to his cabin in his absence and had killed his wife and child. Regardless of all treaties, to Hunniwell an Indian was a savage butcher, who was to be killed at sight; and in point of this is the story of a night when the Blue Pointers were gathered about the fire of a clam-house at what is now the Seavey Landing. Two Indians came in, it being in a time of peace. Leaving their guns against one corner of the room, they joined the white men by the fire.

    Hunniwell came in later. Discovering the savages, he began to walk up and down the floor. Finally he came to the corner where the guns were. He examined them. Carelessly raising one of the weapons to his shoulder, he swept the muzzle about as if sighting an imaginary flight of birds. When the heads of the savages came into range the room was choked with gunpowder-smoke. The two savages lay upon the floor, dead. He is reported to have killed, upon another occasion, five Indians, with a single shot, on the shore of Massacre Pond. This he did with a gun named by him "The Buccaneer."

    "The savages were afraid of Hunniwell, and they hated him accordingly. Having been unable so far to accomplish their designs on the man, they one day came across his horse. Sticking the animal thick with splinters of pitch-pine, which they ignited, they let the tortured beast go on the run, which but fanned the flames."

    Also, see Honeywell Heritage, Vol. 2, No. 1, Richard, Indian fighter and Volume 2, No. 2, Massacre Pond.

    researched by Richard Honeywell (C4)(IS)

    In 1680, Richard served as Constable of Scarborough; in 1682, 1685 and 1688, he was one of two way wardens; and in 1684, he was a selectman. He served as a grand juror various times, and served the community in other capacities during his lifetime. Richard was a frequent witness of deeds, although he signed his name by his mark.

    1 2
  • Birth: ABT 1645
  • _SDATE: 1 JUL 1645 in prob. England
  • Note: In 1676, Richard deposed that he was 31 years old. 3
  • Residence: 1658
  • _SDATE: 1 JUL 1658 Scarborough (or Black Point), Cumberland Co., Maine
  • Note: Richard was one of the early settlers of Scarborough, Maine, also known as Black Point. 2
  • Death: 6 OCT 1703 in Black Point, Scarborough, ME 4 5



    Father: Roger HUNNEWELL b: ABT 1625 in prob. England
    Mother: Bridget NLN (HUNNEWELL)

    Marriage 1 Elizabeth STOVER b: ABT 1653
    • Married: BEF 3 MAR 1674 6 7 8
    Children
    1. Has No Children Roger HUNNEWELL b: ABT 1676
    2. Has No Children John HUNNEWELL b: ABT 1680
    3. Has No Children Elizabeth HUNNEWELL
    4. Has Children Patience HUNNEWELL b: ABT 1674 in prob. Scarborough (now Maine)

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Hunnewell
      Title: Hunnewell, James Frothingham, Hunnewell: NEHG Register, Vol. 54, April 1900 (New England Historic Genealogical Society & Broderbund Software, Inc., 1996)
      Repository:
        Name: Kimberly L. Branagan's Library
        Baldwinsville, NY 13027
        USA

      Page: p. 144
      Quality: 2
    2. Abbrev: Hunnewell Descendants
      Title: Hunnewell, James M. and Honeywell, Samuel Willet, The Descendants of Roger and Ambrose Hunnewell (Honeywell) (Columbus, OH: Midtown Printing Company, 1972)
      Repository:
        Name: NEGHS Circulating Library
        Boston, MA 02116

      Page: p. 3
      Quality: 2
    3. Abbrev: Hunnewell Descendants
      Title: Hunnewell, James M. and Honeywell, Samuel Willet, The Descendants of Roger and Ambrose Hunnewell (Honeywell) (Columbus, OH: Midtown Printing Company, 1972)
      Repository:
        Name: NEGHS Circulating Library
        Boston, MA 02116

      Page: pp. 2-3
      Quality: 2
    4. Abbrev: Honeywell Heritage
      Title: Honeywell Heritage (Trinity, FL: Honeywell Family Association, A. Parks Honeywell, Editor)
      Page: Vol 2, No. 1
      Quality: 2
    5. Abbrev: Hunnewell Descendants
      Title: Hunnewell, James M. and Honeywell, Samuel Willet, The Descendants of Roger and Ambrose Hunnewell (Honeywell) (Columbus, OH: Midtown Printing Company, 1972)
      Repository:
        Name: NEGHS Circulating Library
        Boston, MA 02116

      Page: p. 4
      Quality: 2
    6. Abbrev: Honeywell Heritage
      Title: Honeywell Heritage (Trinity, FL: Honeywell Family Association, A. Parks Honeywell, Editor)
      Page: Vol 2, No. 1
    7. Abbrev: Hunnewell Descendants
      Title: Hunnewell, James M. and Honeywell, Samuel Willet, The Descendants of Roger and Ambrose Hunnewell (Honeywell) (Columbus, OH: Midtown Printing Company, 1972)
      Repository:
        Name: NEGHS Circulating Library
        Boston, MA 02116

      Page: p. 5
    8. Abbrev: Cooke, Francis of the Mayflower
      Title: Ralph V. Wood, Jr., <i>Francis Cooke of the Mayflower</i> (Cambridge, MA: Ralph V. Wood, Jr., 1986)
      Repository:
        Name: NEHGS Library
        Boston, MA

      Page: p. 44
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