Hawley, Hurd, etc.

Entries: 238719    Updated: 2017-12-11 06:07:30 UTC (Mon)    Owner: Julia

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel

  • ID: I104896
  • Name: Increase MATHER
  • Given Name: Increase
  • Surname: Mather
  • Sex: M
  • _UID: D16674D7CE474626904C4217E417A8825D4E
  • Change Date: 16 APR 2015
  • Note:
    copied 5 Apr 2008: http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=mikemather&id=I6778

    The New England Mathers with a special emphasis on the many families who married into our family
    Entries: 93571 Updated: 2008-04-04 17:41:31 UTC (Fri) Contact: Michael
    Name: Increase Mather Reverend Doctor
    Birth: 21 Jun 1639 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Death: 23 Aug 1723 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Burial: Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Note:
    !The attempt to do justice in the brief sketches of the lives of such men as
    Increase Mather and his son Cotton in the present work seems a hopeless task,
    but I will collect from the immense treasuries of information, from such men as
    Reverend Doctor Enoch Pond, Chandler Robbins, William B. Sprague, and others,
    a few facts which I will jot down in their respective places. Reverend Doctor
    Increase Mather was named Increase from the circumstance of the great increase
    of every sort in this country about the time of his birth. He is said to have
    had great intellectual precocity in his early childhood, and greatly out-
    stripped all his classes in acquired knowledge. At the age of twelve he was
    admitted to Harvard College. After being about a year in college his health was
    impaired and he was taken out for a time and put under the care of Reverend
    John Norton of Ipswich. Mr. Norton removed to Boston, and Increase remained
    with him for several years, then returned to Harvard College, and graduated
    in 1656. He commenced preaching the year after graduation. He had a devoted
    mother, who said to him, "My child, if God make thee a good Christian and a
    good scholar, thou wilt have all that thy mother ever asked for thee." One of
    his first sermons was preached in his father's pulpit at Dorchester, and was
    regarded not only by his father, but the congregation, as of uncommon ability,
    and as giving promise of extensive usefulness. He was invited by his oldest
    brother Samuel to visit him in Dublin, Ireland. He sailed for England on July
    3, 1657; the time taken to cross the ocean was five weeks. He spent a little
    time in London, also with his father's friends in Lancashire, thence to Dublin
    where his brother gave him a warm greeting. By the advice of Samuel he became
    a student at Trinity College, Dublin. He became a great favorite of Doctor
    Winter, the Provost of the College, and was chosen a Fellow of the College,
    which honor he declined. He then went over to England and was a preacher to
    John Howe's parish at Torrington in Devon(shire), near to the residence of his
    brother Nathaniel, who was then minister of Barnstable. The following spring,
    1659, Mr. Mather had an invitation from the Governor of Guernsey to preach
    Sabbath morning in the castle and in the afternoon at the town called Peter's
    Port. From Guernsey he went to England and was offered some hundred pounds a
    year if he would conform. He rejected the proposal, and thinking the chances
    for usefulness in that country were not so great as in America he set sail
    from Weymouth in June, 1661, and arrived at Boston about the 1st of September.
    He came to Dorchester on Saturday evening, quite unexpectedly, giving great
    joy to his father. He had the pleasure of meeting his brother Eleazer, who
    had just come from Northampton, and was at the paternal mansion. "The comforted
    old patriarch," says Cotton Mather, "had the privilege of having his two sons
    in his own pulpit, on the following day, while he sat shining between them,
    like the Sun in Gemini."

    A Brief Biographical Sketch
    of the Reverend Increase Mather

    by Andrew Mitchell

    Ever since John Winthrop's sermon on Christian charity, given on board the
    "Arabella," the Puritan colonists of New England envisioned themselves to
    be a unique creation. They were citizens of "a citie upon a hill", a model,
    planted by God to shine forth from among men. They had a message to present to
    the world, and each member of that first generation of settlers felt deeply
    the importance of such a vision. As time passed, and as new colonists entered
    the region, the overall spirituality of the Massachusetts Bay Colony and its
    environs began to decline. The maturing adults of the second generation were
    not as interested in bringing their families into the federal covenant, and
    many preachers felt that their respect was falling. Eventually, the perfect
    "citie" envisioned by the early Puritans would fade away, the traditions
    conquered at last by change. One man saw the dying out of the old days and the
    transition to the new. His name was Increase Mather. The Reverend Increase
    Mather, a leader among second generation Puritans, fought hard to keep the
    original principles and Divine mission of New England alive, but even he could
    not keep the inhabitants of Massachusetts from backsliding and other sins. His
    life is one of constant conflict and struggle; an uphill struggle against the
    passage of time.
    The Mather family emigrated to America in 1635, where Richard Mather - the
    head of the clan - assumed the post of a minister in Dorchester, a small town
    overlooking Boston. On June 21, 1639, his last son, Increase Mather was born.
    Increase was brought up in a household where religion was just as much a part
    of life as food and drink. His mother, Katherine, a godly and devout woman,
    had a strong influence on him. It was her prayer that above all else, her son
    might be a good Christian and a good scholar. Mather would live to fulfill his
    mother's prayer.
    In 1651, at the age of 12, he entered Harvard, though because of his young age
    and frail frame, he resided off campus with the Reverend John Norton, a close
    friend and contemporary of Reverend Mather. In March of 1655, soon after his
    mother died, Mather began to grapple with the real faith of Christianity and
    how one claimed it for his own. He was convicted with anguish and horror in his
    soul as he contemplated the evils in his life. As an act of purging himself
    from the guilt that he was burdened with, Mather took a piece of paper and
    wrote down his sins on it. He then offered upon a prayer of confession to the
    Lord and burnt the paper. He talked more and more with Reverend Norton about
    grace and its saving effects. For two months he struggled with this until
    finally, in May, he felt a spirit of peace enter his soul. A year later, Mather
    graduated from Harvard and began devotong himself to the pulpit, where he felt
    a special calling. His first sermon was delivered in June 1657, but he was
    not to remain in America for very long. Increase left for Europe three weeks
    after giving his first message in order to study at Trinity College in Dublin.
    He received an M.A. in 1658 from the institution, was offered a fellowship,
    and invited to stay on as a teacher. Increase, still feeling called to the
    ministry, politely declined the invitation and instead moved to the Channel
    Island of Guernsey, where he served as a garrison chaplain from 1659-1661.
    Upon the restoration of the monarchy to England, and the rise of Anglicanism
    over Puritanism, Increase felt it unsafe to remain in the Old World and soon
    left for New England and home.
    In March of 1661/1662, Increase married his step-sister, Maria Cotton, and
    the following February, their eldest son, Cotton Mather. Cotton would grow
    up admiring his father and would fight alongside him in many debates. Cotton
    became Increase's hope that the next generation of Puritans might continue
    to live according to the same principles as their fathers. On May 27, 1664,
    Increase began to preach at the Old North Church (the Second Church) in
    Boston, one of the most prestigious places of worship in the whole colony.
    Governors and assemblymen would attend the church during sessions, and several
    of the elite merchants too were members of Mather's congregation. Increase
    would hold this post until his death almost sixty years later. He was quickly
    established as a voice of authority in the colony, and soon was looked up to
    as a prominent leader both in the church as well as in the state. During the
    year 1669, Mather would lose first his father and then his brother within
    three months of each other. The shock threw Increase into severe melancholy
    from which he never completely recovered. In 1684, the Massachusetts Bay
    Colony's charter was revoked by Charles II, and a new charter, including
    tolerance for non-Puritans, was forced upon the New Englanders. Under the next
    king, James II, Massachusetts and its surrounding colonies became a royal
    dominion, and a new governor, Sir Edmund Andros, was sent over to act as the
    king's man. In 1687, a Declaration of Indulgence was issued by the king, which
    prohibited any discrimination against Catholics. This decree, combined with
    the tyrannical rule of Andros made the Puritans quite upset; the next year,
    they sent the Reverend Increase Mather to England, in order that he might
    persuade King James II to revoke the royal charter and to give New England
    back its old one. No sooner had Increase arrived and nearly convinced James,
    than he was overthrown and a new pair of monarchs, William and Mary, assumed
    the throne of England. Again Mather tried to lobby for the old charter of
    Massachusetts, but to no avail. In 1692, after four years of fruitless
    petitioning, Mather sailed back home, never to return again to the home of
    his ancestors.
    In 1703, a few years after his return to Boston, Mather was forced to resign
    his seat as president of Harvard College, a position he had held for the past
    twenty years. Many on the board wanted Mather to leave his ministry and settle
    closer to the university, but Increase refused to leave the Old North Church.
    In April of 1714, after over fifty years of marriage, and having borne nine
    children, Maria (Cotton) Mather died. The next year, Increase remarried, this
    time to a relative of Maria, Anne Lake Cotton. Seven years later, on September
    27, 1722, Increase blacked-out, possibly suffering a mild stroke. During the
    next ten months, he was confined to bed, constantly attended to by his son,
    Cotton. In August of 1723, his bladder gave out, and three weeks later, in
    excruciating pain, Reverend Doctor Increase Mather died in his son's arms: he
    was eighty-four years old.
    As a minister of the Word, Reverend Increase Mather was quite orderly and
    intellectual. He often stayed in his study for most of the day, and many
    criticized this seemingly lack of interest in the welfare of his congregation.
    Yet Mather believed that his greatest service to both God and man lay in his
    sermons, and as such, he devoted many long hours of preparation for them. He
    delivered his messages in a very plain style, without fancy rhetorical devices.
    He emphasized man's need to grow in grace - by applying himself to worship,
    study, and good works - and the complementary need of growing dead to the
    world. Beginning in 1675, Mather pioneered a new form of sermon: the jeremiad.
    Named after the weeping prophet of old, the jeremiad's purpose was to single
    out specific groups amid the community for exhortation. Private concerns began
    to be recognized in the sermons, in particular the magistrates of the law.
    The jeremiad would play a key role in Mather's activities to save the future
    generations of Puritans. A large part of the problem lay in the overwhelming
    corruptness of the third generation, a problem which their parents did little
    or nothing to stop. Gradually the interests of New England were shifting from
    a religious aspect to a more worldly one. The older generation - Mather and
    his contemporaries - looked upon the Church of New England as a direct tie with
    the historical, Apostolic Church of old. As the community started to pull away
    from the traditions of their forefathers, the Church began to become more and
    more identified with New England as a whole. The colony had a Divine mission;
    like Israel of old, they were the chosen people of God, a model, a "citie" set
    upon a hill. Thus, ministers felt even more the need to reform the land.

    Included in his will "I do hereby signify to my Executor, That it is my Mind &
    Will that my Negro Servant called Spaniard Shall not be sold after my Decease;
    but I do then give Him his Liberty: Let him then be esteemed a Free negro. Jun
    4, 1719"

    Reverends Increase, Cotton, and Samuel Mather are buried at Copps Hill Cemetery
    in Boston.
    Change Date: 7 Jan 2008 at 23:30:32

    Father: Richard Mather Reverend b: 1596 in Lowton, Winwick Parish, Lancashire, England
    Mother: Catherine Hoult b: 18 Jan 1595/1596 in Bury, Lancashire, England c: 18 Jan 1595/1596 in Bury, Lancashire, England

    Marriage 1 Maria Cotton b: 16 Feb 1641/1642 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Married: 6 Jan 1660/1661 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Children
    Cotton Mather Reverend Doctor b: 12 Feb 1662/1663 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 15 Feb 1662/1663 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Maria Mather b: 17 Mar 1664/1665 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 19 Mar 1664/1665 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Elizabeth Mather b: 6 Jan 1665/1666 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 3 Feb 1665/1666 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Nathaniel Mather Reverend b: 6 Jul 1669 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 11 Jul 1669 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Sarah Mather b: 9 Nov 1671 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 12 Nov 1671 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Samuel Mather Reverend b: 28 Aug 1674 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 30 Aug 1674 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Abigail Mather b: 16 Apr 1677 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 20 Apr 1677 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Hannah Mather b: 30 May 1680 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 16 Jul 1680 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Catherine Mather b: 14 Sep 1682 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 17 Sep 1682 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Jerusha Mather b: 16 Apr 1684 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts c: 20 Apr 1684 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts

    Marriage 2 Anne Lake b: 12 Oct 1663 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
    Married: 1715 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts
  • Birth: 21 JUN 1639 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA
  • Death: 23 AUG 1723 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
  • Title: Rev.



    Father: Richard MATHER b: 1596 in Lowton, Winwick Parish, Lancashire, England
    Mother: Catharine HOLT b: 18 JAN 1596 in Bury, , Lancashire, England

    Marriage 1 Maria COTTON b: 15 FEB 1642 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    • Married: 6 JAN 1661 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA 1
    Children
    1. Has Children Cotton MATHER b: 12 FEB 1663 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    2. Has No Children Maria MATHER b: 17 MAR 1665 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    3. Has No Children Elizabeth MATHER b: 6 JAN 1666 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    4. Has No Children Nathaniel MATHER b: 6 JUL 1669 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    5. Has No Children Sarah MATHER b: 9 NOV 1671 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    6. Has No Children Samuel MATHER b: 28 AUG 1674 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    7. Has No Children Abigail MATHER b: 16 APR 1677 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    8. Has No Children Hannah MATHER b: 30 MAY 1680 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    9. Has No Children Catherine MATHER b: 14 SEP 1682 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA
    10. Has No Children Jerusha MATHER b: 16 APR 1684 in Boston, Suffolk Co., MA

    Marriage 2 Anne LAKE b: 12 OCT 1663 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA
    • Married: 1715 in Dorchester, Suffolk Co., MA 1

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Web: The New England Mathers with a special emphasis on the many families who married into our famil
      Title: Michael, Web: The New England Mathers with a special emphasis on the many families who married into our family (Name: Name: Name: Entries: 87,783 Updated: 15 Nov 2007;;;)
      Note:
      Source Medium: Electronic
      Repository:
        Name: world connect db=mikemather
  • We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

    Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help
    We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

    RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.