Johanson Family Tree-Roots spreading from Sweden, Medieval England, Massachusetts, and South Carolina

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  • ID: I1990
  • Name: William Miles NEVITT Sr. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT 1749 in Upper Marlborough,Prince Georges Co., MD 8
  • Census: . 1-4-1-0-1 1790 Fairfield Co, SC
  • Military Service: In the account of Capt. Bowie of PG Co. for services rendered MD troops 10 DEC 1777
  • Occupation: Planter
  • Event: Attended Jonathan Pratt's estate dale Fact 2 APR 1802
  • Residence: 1779 Upper Marlborough, Prince George's County, MD 4
  • Event: Court 16 JAN 1799 Fairfield Co, SC
  • Event: WVACOUNTRY86 -through Brooks Nevitt Moore Ancestry DNA Match
  • Death: BET 13 MAR 1812 AND 1820 in Fairfield Co, SC
  • Event: Witnessed letter for bond of Administration for William Robuck with Abner fant and Henry Erdington Fact 13 MAR 1812 Fairfield Dist. SC
  • Event: At estate sale of Moses Padgett Fact 11 NOV 1811 Fairfield Dist. SC
  • Event: 1790 census was actually taken in SC the first 6 months of 1792!! Fact
  • Event: DAR National Number is 810476. Issued on the 13 of April 2002. Fact
  • Event: Named in Grandmother Mary Nevitt McAtee's will. Fact 1774
  • Event: Signed the inventory of Mary McAtee as next of kin along with Anne Burch Fact 29 DEC 1774
  • Event: Upper Marlborough, Prince George's County, MD Fact 1779
  • Event: Plaintiff in court case in Newberry, SC against defendent Henry Liles Fact MAR 1787
  • Event: WMN, the plaintiff in this cause comes into court by Peter Carnes Gent'l his attorney and suffers a Nonsuit by his consent and pays cost of suit and S'd Plt'f in Mercy. Fact JUN 1790
  • Event: bought for 80 pounds from William Holley 100 Acres ..on the North side of Broad River on land surveyed for William Phillips....land originally granted to Basil Murske. Fact 16 SEP 1793
  • Event: Bought for 30 pounds from Abraham Mayfield hundred acres on North side of Broad River on Rocky Creek originally granted to Joseph Howard in 1774. Fact 23 FEB 1796
  • Event: Fairfield Census page 212 Fact 1800
  • Event: Nevitt, William Miles SC FAIRFIELD DIST. 212 1800 11111-10001-41 Fact 1800
  • Event: Pettit Juror Court JUL 1795 Fairfield Co, SC
  • Census: William Nevitt was age 27 and had Margaret age 5 in his household 1776 Upper Marlborough,Prince Georges Co., MD
  • Military Service: William Nevitt listed in Capt. Ramsey's company, which would be the 5th Company of Smallwood's Battalion. ABT JUL 1776 Maryland 9 10
  • Military Service: Battle of Brooklyn; Taken captive, a member of the Maryland 400 27 AUG 1776 Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA
  • _LINK: https://msamaryland400.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/battle-of-brooklyn-roll-of-honor/?blogsub=confirming#blog_subscription-2 11 12 13 9
  • Military Service: on the " Return to Mr Christepher Richmond of cash paid to each of the men which Whare released from captivity at New York." 1777 Maryland 9
  • Military Service: on the " Return to Mr Christepher Richmond of cash paid to each of the men which Whare released from captivity at New York." 1777 Maryland
  • Military Service: Battle of Brooklyn; Taken captive, a member of the Maryland 400 27 AUG 1776 Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA
  • Military Service: Battle of Brooklyn; Taken captive, a member of the Maryland 400 27 AUG 1776 Brooklyn, New York City, New York, USA
  • _LINK: https://msamaryland400.wordpress.com/2015/08/27/battle-of-brooklyn-roll-of-honor/?blogsub=confirming#blog_subscription-2 14 15 16 9
  • Military Service: on the " Return to Mr Christepher Richmond of cash paid to each of the men which Whare released from captivity at New York." 1777 Maryland 9
  • _PHOTO:
  • File: C:\Users\SCJ-Len\Documents\Family Tree Maker\Our Johanson Family Tree-Roots spreading from Sweden, Medieval England, Massachusetts, and South Car(4) Media\0018 Rev War Soldier-4.jpg
  • Title: 0018 Rev War Soldier



    Father: Richard NEVITT III b: ABT 1718 in Charles County, MD
    Mother: Margaret MILES b: ABT 1715 in Prince Georges County MD

    Marriage 1 Priscilla MILES b: ABT 1757 in Prince Georges County MD
    • Married: 1 JAN 1779 in Prince Georges County MD 17 18 19
    Children
    1. Has Children William Miles NEVITT b: 6 JUL 1784 in Prince Georges County MD
    2. Has Children Cornelius Quincy Nevitt b: ABT 1788 in Fairfield Co, SC
    3. Has Children Benjamin Lovejoy Nevitt b: 17 APR 1794 in Fairfield Co, SC
    4. Has Children Elizabeth Nevitt b: ABT 1798 in Fairfield Co, SC
    5. Has No Children Kellis Nevitt b: ABT 1790 in Fairfield Co, SC
    6. Has No Children John Nevitt b: ABT 1782 in PG County MD

    Marriage 2 Unknown Sullivan b: ABT 1750 in Maryland
      Children
      1. Has Children William Nevitt b: 20 DEC 1773 in Maryland
      2. Has No Children Ann M. Nevitt b: ABT 1775 in Upper Marlborough,Prince Georges Co., MD
      3. Has No Children Margaret Nevitt b: ABT 1771 in Upper Marlborough,Prince Georges Co., MD

      Sources:
      1. Title: 1810 United States Federal Census about William Nevitt
        Repository:
          Name: Ancestry.com

        Text: Name: William Nevitt Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Fairfield, South Carolina Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 15: 1 Free White Persons - Males - 16 thru 25: 3 Free White Persons - Males - 45 and over: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 16 thru 25: 1 Free White Persons - Females - 45 and over : 1 Number of All Other Free Persons: 5 Numbers of Slaves: 4 Number of Household Members Under 16: 1 Number of Household Members Over 25: 2 Number of Household Members: 16
      2. Title: South Carolina Department of Archives and History
        Repository:
          Name: www.archivesindex.sc.gov

        Text: Series: S213192 Volume: 0043 Page: 00547 Item: 004 Date: 5/9/1814 Description: NEVITT, WILLIAM MILES AND WILLIAM ROOK, PLAT FOR 64.4 ACRES ON ROCK CREEK, FAIRFIELD DISTRICT, SURVEYED BY JOHN A. THARP. Names indexed: EDERINGTON, F.; NEVITT, WILLIAM MILES; ROOK, WILLIAM; THARP, JOHN A. Locations: BROAD RIVER; FAIRFIELD DISTRICT; ROCK BRANCH Document type: PLAT
      3. Title: Maryland Archives- Rev. War Papers
        Note:
        Source Medium: Card
      4. Author: Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.
        Title: Maryland Census, 1772-1890
        Publication: Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.Original data - Compiled and digitized by Mr. Jackson and AIS from microfilmed schedules of the U.S. Federal Decennial Census, territorial/state censuses, and/or census substitutes.Orig;
        Repository:
          Name: iOS Application
      5. Title: Will of Mary Nevitt McAtee--Maryland Wills 1774
        Text: Mary Nevitt Macatee's will, dated Nov. 8 1774, was probated Dec. 21 of that same year. her will indicates that her first husband, Richard, had two sons, John and Richard Nevitt, who would have been minors at the time of their father's death, and that Mary, married a second time had other children. She left the following to her family: " To grandchildren: Children of my son John Nevitt, One negro man John Cooke, beds, pots, blankets, and stock to be in the possession of my son John Nevitt, during his life and then given to his children. To grandson William Miles Nevitt, son of Richard Nevitt, furniture and stock. To daughter Rosamond Macatee, stock and personalty. To grandson John Tennison, son of my daughter Elizabeth Tennison, stock and 400 lbs of tobacco. To grandson John Nevitt, Jr. one negro man Ben, stock and wearing apparel, To daughter Ann Burch, one negress Lucy, 1000lbs of tobacco and book. To grandson Charles Nevitt, stock and iron pot. To daughters Ann Burch and Rosamond Macatee, wearing apparel. To grandsons John Nevitt and William Miles Nevitt, the residue. Barbara, Catherine, and Thomas Mccpherson were witnesses to this will. Mary's son John Nevitt was made executor of the estate, with grandson William Miles Nevitt to be executor if John were deceased.
      6. Title: Maryland Census, 1772-1890
        Repository:
          Name: Ancestry.com

        Page: Source Information: Jackson, Ron V., Accelerated Indexing Systems, comp.. Maryland Census, 1772-1890 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.
        Text: Name: Miles William Nevitt State: MD County: Prince George's County Township: Upper Marlborough Year: 1779 Database: MD Early Census Index
      7. Title: Ancestry DNA Member Match
        Repository:
          Name: Ancestry.com

        Page: WVACOUNTRY86 through Brooks Nevitt
      8. Title: Prince Georges Co. MD census of 1776
        Text: William Nevitt was age 27 and had Margaret age 5 in his household
      9. Title: Maryland Archives- Rev. War Papers
        Note:
        Source Medium: Card
        Page: Rev War Papers
        Text: Maryland Archives--Rev War papers
        William Nevit-- in the account of Capt. Bowie for services rendered the Maryland troops Dec 10, 1777.
        box 2, folder4, No. 2
        William Nevit--on the " Return to Mr Christepher Richmond of cash paid to each of the men which Whare released from captivity at New York."
        box 6, folder 25
      10. Title: Christian Nevitt Gregory
        Page: William Nevitt's Revolutionary War record
        Text: re: National archives. They have no record on Wm Nevitt as per your note about prisoners.
        So before we left on vacation, I contacted Mr.C,Sherrill of the TN Archives and hired him to get what info he could find.

        He called me today: Following is the document he wrote out for me. " a search of the compiled service records of Revolutionary soldiers proved fruitless. I then began a more careful study of the document you
        provided, which is a list of payments "to each of the men released from Captivity at New York." I found that at least one of the men on that list, Timothy Collin(g)s, was a Revolutionary War pensioner who
        had served in the Maryland Line. This helped me to feel certain that the document did pertain to Revolutionary War prisoners of war from Maryland.
        I then found Rieman Steuart's "History of the Maryland Line in the Revolutionary War" which lists the nine companiesof Col. William Smallwood's Battalion, formed 1776. The captains of the companies
        match the names of the captains in the documents. Working down the list in the document, they match as follows: ( He then gives list of each company.)
        "The document shows that Willism Basford and William Nevit were in Capt. Ramsey's company, which would be the 5th Company of Smallwood's Battalion.

        "Volumn 18 of the "Archives of Maryland" provides the muster rolls of these companies on pages 6 through 20. In checking the names of the prisoners as shown on the document, mamy of them appear in the
        published roster. Among the matches were: (list)
        Not all of the prisoners were named on the published roster. The rosters were written through July 1776. The prison document is undated but must ante-date July 1776, since there were new recuits who joined
        after July and who were among those captured. This would account for the presence of names on the prison document which do not appear in the roster.

        "The roster of Capt.Ramsey's company is not listed along with these others in the front of Volume 18, but the introduction to the volumne mentions the some previously lost muster rolls turned up late in the
        publication process and were included in an appendix. In the appendix (pages 641-642) is found a partial muster roll of Capt. Ramsey's 5th
        Company, giving names of 32 enlisted men and four officers. Among these are William Basford, who appears on the prison document.

        " Unfortunately, William Nevitt is not on this list, however, the list is marked "torn off". At the bottom is a summary of the soldiers present, which gives the "census" as including 54 privates and 12 other
        men of higher rank. Obviously, more that 20 names were once listed on the part of the muster roll which was torn off.

        "This fact would account for William Nevit's not being in the compiled service records at the National Archives; those records were compiled from these same rolls. "
      11. Title: Battle of Brooklyn Roll of Honor
        Publication: Date: 8-27-2015;
        Repository:
          Name: internet

        Page: The Maryland 400
        Text: On August 27, 1776, after a week of anticipation, and after hours of marching, the Continental Army fought the British at the Battle of Brooklyn, the first large-scale battle of the Revolutionary War. All told, the Americans lost about 300 killed, and another 1,100 captured, out of any army of 10,000. The British estimated they lost around 400 their 22,000 men.

        In the latter stages of the battle, as the surrounded Americans were desperately retreating, a portion of the Maryland troops made a daring stand. Facing a much larger, better-trained foe, the ?Maryland 400,? as they are now known, made a series of charges, taking heavy casualties but holding the British at bay long enough for the rest of the Americans to escape.

        All told, the Marylanders lost 256 officers and men ?Kill?d & Missing.? The five companies which were part of that charge, the Third, Fourth, Sixth, Ninth, and Seventh Independent, lost between 60 and 80 percent of their men.

        While Col. William Smallwood, commander of the Maryland troops, compiled a list of who the killed and missing were, that list has since disappeared. In fact, the goal of this project is to learn the names and fate of the Maryland soldiers. We have learned the names of four men killed at the battle, and 70 taken prisoner. We know that about 500 of the men who fought at the battle were alive afterwards, although some may have been taken prisoner; there are about 300 others whose fate we do not yet know. Unfortunately, records of non-officers killed or wounded were not kept carefully.

        As a tribute, below is a list of the killed and captured Marylanders, with links to biographies.

        Killed
        William Sands, a nineteen-year-old sergeant in the Seventh Company. Sands was a native of Annapolis, and a collection of papers from his brief military career have been donated to the Maryland State Archives, and are available online.

        Capt. Daniel Bowie, commander of the Fourth Company. Bowie was 20 or 21 year old, and had been with his company for a little over six weeks when he led them at the Battle of Brooklyn. The night before, Bowie wrote out his will, making provisions ?if I fall on the field of battle.? He was wounded and taken prisoner, possibly during the desperate last stand of the Marylanders, and died in captivity a short time later.

        Joseph Butler, a lieutenant of the Fourth Company. He was wounded early in the battle, perhaps in the initial assault the Marylanders faced, before the Americans were surrounded. Like Bowie, Butler was captured, and died soon after, while still a prisoner. The night before the battle, as the troops were preparing to march, Butler took some of his fellow soldiers aside and gave them instructions of what to do for his family if he was killed.

        Capt. Edward Veazey, leader of the Seventh Independent Company. Veazey was also killed early in the battle. His company was later part of the heroic stand of the Marylanders.

        Captured
        Pvt. Alexander Allen Pvt. John Hughes
        Pvt. John Armstrong Pvt. James Hurdle
        Pvt. William Baker Pvt. Alexander Jackson
        Pvt. William Basford Pvt. Philip Jinkins
        Pvt. Thomas Barker Pvt. Philip Kern
        Pvt. Joseph Barry Pvt. George Knott
        Pvt. James Berry Pvt. William Locke
        Pvt. Christopher Beall Pvt. John Lowry
        Pvt. Joseph Bigs Pvt. Valentine Lynn
        Capt. Daniel Bowie [died in captivity] Pvt. Thomas Mason
        1st Lt. Joseph Butler [died in captivity] Pvt. John McClain
        Pvt. Crisenberry Clift Pvt. Daniel McKay
        Pvt. John Cobeth Sgt. Thomas McKeel
        Pvt. Francis Cole Sgt. Samuel McMillan
        Pvt. Timothy Collins Cpl. William McMillan
        Pvt. John Cooper Pvt. Joseph Merchant
        Pvt. Thomas Cooper Pvt. James Murphy
        Ens. William Courts 3rd Lt. Walker Muse
        Pvt. Robert Crafford Pvt. Frederick Myre
        3rd Lt. Edward De Coursey Pvt. William Nevitt
        Pvt. Samuel Denny Pvt. Jeremiah Owings
        2nd Lt. Hatch Dent, Jr. Pvt. William Pearce
        Sgt. Daniel Dwigens Sgt. Alexander Porter [Naylor]
        Cpl. Samuel Dwigens 2nd Lt. Edward Prall
        Pvt. John Enright Pvt. Isaac Rice
        Ens. James Farnandis 2nd Lt. William Ridgely
        Pvt. Thomas Fisher Pvt. Charles Riely
        Sgt. David Giveny Pvt. Charles Simms
        Pvt. Samuel Glasgow Pvt. James Smith
        Pvt. John Good 1st Lt. William Sterrett
        Cpl. Zachariah Gray Pvt. Greenbury Watts
        Pvt. Jacob Greenwald Pvt. Philip Weller
        Cpl. Samuel Hamilton Pvt. Richard Whelan
        Cpl. Basil Holland Pvt. Zachariah Willing
        Pvt. William Holms 2nd Lt. Samuel Turbutt Wright
      12. Title: Finding the Maryland 400
        Repository:
          Name: internet

        Page: Project update: A Company Completed
        Text: We are very pleased to be able to announce that we have written biographies of all the known soldiers of the Fifth Company! This is an important step towards the goal of the project: writing biographies of all the Marylanders who fought at the Battle of Brooklyn (900 men, in twelve companies). We first focused on the Fifth Company in 2014, beginning with this blog post.

        The Fifth Company is one of several that has only partial enlistment records. The original muster roll from early 1776, as published in Archives of Maryland Online vol. 18, includes only 36 men, while a full-strength company, like the Fifth was, had 74 officers and men. Of the names that are included, two were not even in the company when it traveled to New York: Walker Muse, listed as the company?s ensign, was made a third lieutenant and transferred to the Ninth Company, while Private John Marr was discharged on May 18, 1776.

        Our research was able to uncover the names of 13 additional members of the Fifth Company (one of whom, Henry Williams, deserted as the soldiers marched into Philadelphia on July 31, 1776). These soldiers were identified from a range of sources. Some later applied for veteran?s pensions, and others were mentioned in the pension applications of the comrades. William Nevitt, captured at the Battle of Brooklyn, was identified through records of prisoners. Christian Castler?s enlistment came to light only because he was accused of shooting at one of his officers. Michael Nowland was recorded as being part of the company in a list of sick American soldiers in Philadelphia in December 1776. Two men, David McMechen and William Hammond are tentatively included in the company because they were witnesses of Edward Sinclair?s will, written in camp in October 1776. McMechen was later a part of the Whig Club, a militant revolutionary organization in Baltimore that included a number of other members of the Fifth Company. You can check out all of the biographies of the Fifth Company soldiers, and the rest of the First Maryland Regiment (182 and counting!) here.
      13. Title: Archives of Maryland Online
        Page: Biographical series
        Text: William Nevitt
        MSA SC 3520-17217

        Biography:

        William Nevitt enlisted in Captain Nathaniel Ramsey's Fifth Company, part of the First Maryland Regiment, in 1776. [1] He was present among the Maryland 400 at the Battle of Brooklyn. The First Maryland Regiment were the first troops Maryland raised at the beginning of the Revolutionary War. Maryland was more than willing to do its part to recruit the men needed to fill the Continental Army's depleted ranks. [2] A few days after independence was declared, the First Maryland Regiment was ordered to New York so it could join the forces of General George Washington. The regiment arrived there in early August, with the Battle of Brooklyn set between the Continental Army and the British Army, joined by their Hessian allies.

        He and his company served at the Battle of Brooklyn in late August 1776. Ramsey's company, Nevitt included, was placed at the front of the lines, but "hardly a man [in the company] fell," even though they took the first line of fire from the British. [3] This confirmed the assessment of the British Parliament's Annual Register which described, how "almost a whole regiment from Maryland?of young men from the best families in the country was cut to pieces" but it brought men of the Maryland 400 together. [4] Years later, Captain Enoch Anderson of the Delaware Regiment wrote about the Battle of Brooklyn, saying the following:

        "A little before day, we marched towards the enemy, two miles from our camp we saw them. A little after daylight our Regiment and Colonel Smallwood's Regiment from Maryland, in front of the enemy took possession of a high commanding ground,--our right to the harbour. Cannonading now began in both armies...Colonel Smallwood's Regiment took another course,--they were surrounded but they fought hard. They lost about two hundred men, the rest got in. A hard day this, for us poor Yankees! Superior discipline and numbers had overcome us. A gloomy time it was, but we solaced ourselves that at some other time we should do better." [5]

        The Battle of Brooklyn, the first large-scale battle, fits into the larger context of the Revolutionary War. If the Maryland Line had not stood and fought the British, enabling the rest of the Continental Army to escape, then the Continental Army would been decimated, resulting in the end of the Revolutionary War. This heroic stand gave the regiment the nickname of the Old Line and those who made the stand in the battle are remembered as the Maryland 400.

        At least seventy Marylanders, including Nevitt was taken prisoner, which was not unusual for privates after the battle. [6] Likely Nevitt did not fair well as a prisoner. This is because the British were not ready for the large number of prisoners they captured after the battle. Since Britain was not at war with a foreign country, the captured Continentals were treated as rebels, rather than prisoners of war, who were treated cruely, abused, and tortured. [7] In the aftermath of the battle, Nevitt, along with other captured soldiers, were forcibly housed in New York churches, not including those that were Anglican, and on prison ships. [8] Edwin Burrows, in describing the experience of Long Island native, Elias Cornelius, noted that

        "These facilities, most of which remained in use for the duration of the war [for prisoners], were shockingly overcrowded...Prisoners never had enough to eat, and what they did have was barely edible. Their clothes were infested with ticks and lice. The water stank. The slop buckets and necessary tubs overflowed. Anyone lucky enough to survive the rampant typhus, dysentery, and smallpox eventually succumbed to the scurvy, which made their teeth fall out and caused their gums and eyes to bleed incessantly. Those who got out alive told of comrades so hungry they ate their own shoes and clothes, of prison ships whose decks were slippery with excrement, of wagons rumbling through the cobblestone streets with corpses stacked like cordwood, of bodies flung carelessly into Wallabout Bay or hastily interred by the dozen on nearby beaches."

        Nevitt was exchanged at the end of 1776 and received his back pay after his release. [9] Many Marylanders were exchanged, with British forces, in late 1776 and early 1777.

        Nevitt's life after being released from British captivity is not clear. Further research has not been able to uncover a pension for William Nevitt. The only mention of pension is a 1927 letter to Bureau of Pensions asking for a copy of Nevitt's pension, but his name was not mentioned in the rest of the application. [11]

        - Burkely Hermann, Maryland Society of the Sons of American Revolution Research Fellow, 2016

        Notes

        [1] Return of Prisoners from Captivity in New York, Maryland State Papers, Revolutionary Papers, MdHR 19970-06-25/01 [MSA S997-6-59, 1/7/3/11].

        [2] Arthur Alexander, "How Maryland Tried to Raise Her Continential Quotas." Maryland Historical Magazine 42, no. 3 (1947), 187-188, 196.

        [3] "Extract of a letter from New York: Account of the battle on Long Island." American Archives S5 V2 107-108.

        [4] Mark Andrew Tacyn. "'To The End:' The First Maryland Regiment and the American Revolution" (PhD Diss., University of Maryland College Park, 1999), 4.

        [5] Enoch Anderson, Personal Recollections of Captain Enoch Anderson: Eyewitness Accounts of the American Revolution (New York: New York Times & Arno Press, 1971), 21-22.

        [6] Henry P. Johnson, The Campaign Around New York and Brooklyn (1878; reprint, New York: Da Capo Press, 1971), 174-5, 177, 179.

        [7] George C. Doughan, Revolution on the Hudson: New York City and the Hudson River Valley in the American War of Independence (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2016), 72.

        [8] Doughan, 133.

        [9] Return of Prisoners from Captivity in New York; Pay for William Nevitt, Maryland State Papers, Revolutionary Papers, MdHR 19970-2-4-2 [MSA S997-2, 1/7/3/8].

        [11] Pension of Isaac Seeley. Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files. National Archives. M804. Record Group 15. Roll 2148. Pension number S. 11369. Courtesy of Fold3.com
      14. Title: Battle of Brooklyn Roll of Honor
        Publication: Date: 8-27-2015;
        Repository:
          Name: internet

        Page: The Maryland 400
        Text: On August 27, 1776, after a week of anticipation, and after hours of marching, the Continental Army fought the British at the Battle of Brooklyn, the first large-scale battle of the Revolutionary War. All told, the Americans lost about 300 killed, and another 1,100 captured, out of any army of 10,000. The British estimated they lost around 400 their 22,000 men.

        In the latter stages of the battle, as the surrounded Americans were desperately retreating, a portion of the Maryland troops made a daring stand. Facing a much larger, better-trained foe, the ?Maryland 400,? as they are now known, made a series of charges, taking heavy casualties but holding the British at bay long enough for the rest of the Americans to escape.

        All told, the Marylanders lost 256 officers and men ?Kill?d & Missing.? The five companies which were part of that charge, the Third, Fourth, Sixth, Ninth, and Seventh Independent, lost between 60 and 80 percent of their men.

        While Col. William Smallwood, commander of the Maryland tro
      15. Title: Finding the Maryland 400
        Repository:
          Name: internet

        Page: Project update: A Company Completed
        Text: We are very pleased to be able to announce that we have written biographies of all the known soldiers of the Fifth Company! This is an important step towards the goal of the project: writing biographies of all the Marylanders who fought at the Battle of Brooklyn (900 men, in twelve companies). We first focused on the Fifth Company in 2014, beginning with this blog post.

        The Fifth Company is one of several that has only partial enlistment records. The original muster roll from early 1776, as published in Archives of Maryland Online vol. 18, includes only 36 men, while a full-strength company, like the Fifth was, had 74 officers and men. Of the names that are included, two were not even in the company when it traveled to New York: Walker Muse, listed as the company?s ensign, was made a third lieutenant and transferred to the Ninth Company, while Private John Marr was discharged on May 18, 1776.

        Our research was able to uncover the names of 13 additional members of the Fifth Company (one of whom, Henry Wil
      16. Title: Archives of Maryland Online
        Page: Biographical series
        Text: William Nevitt
        MSA SC 3520-17217

        Biography:

        William Nevitt enlisted in Captain Nathaniel Ramsey's Fifth Company, part of the First Maryland Regiment, in 1776. [1] He was present among the Maryland 400 at the Battle of Brooklyn. The First Maryland Regiment were the first troops Maryland raised at the beginning of the Revolutionary War. Maryland was more than willing to do its part to recruit the men needed to fill the Continental Army's depleted ranks. [2] A few days after independence was declared, the First Maryland Regiment was ordered to New York so it could join the forces of General George Washington. The regiment arrived there in early August, with the Battle of Brooklyn set between the Continental Army and the British Army, joined by their Hessian allies.

        He and his company served at the Battle of Brooklyn in late August 1776. Ramsey's company, Nevitt included, was placed at the front of the lines, but "hardly a man [in the company] fell," even though they took the first line of fire from th
      17. Author: Brown, Phillip; Ian, Helen W. Brown
        Title: Index of Marriage Licenses, Prince George's County, Maryland 1777-1886
        Publication: Date: 2009;
        Repository:
          Name: Google Book

        Text: Thomas Nevet and Henrietta Dorsey 1-3-1798 Ann Nevitt and Joseph Adams 11-5-1791 Charles Nevitt and Levinah Bowling 1-18-1780 James Nevitt and Ruth Conn 5-31-1777 Lavinah Nevitt and Elisha Perry 9-30-1799 Mary Nevitt and Martin Yates 12-31-1798 William Nevitt and Rebecca Lovejoy 9-15-1803 Wm Miles Nevitt and Priscilla Miles 1-1-1779
      18. Author: Henry C. Peden
        Title: More Marylanders to Carolina: migration of Marylanders to North Carolina and South Carolina prior to 1800
        Publication: Name: Heritage Books,; Date: 2006;
        Page: 19
        Text: NEVITT William Miles Nevitt married Priscilla Miles in Prince George's County, Maryland by license dated January 1, 1779, and moved to Fairfield County, ...
      19. Title: Maryland Marriages, 1655-1850
        Repository:
          Name: Ancestry.com

        Page: Dodd, Jordan, Liahona Research, comp.. Maryland Marriages, 1655-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004
        Text: William Miles Nevitt Gender: Male Marriage Date: 1 Jan 1779 Spouse: Priscilla Miles Spouse Gender: Male County: Prince George's County
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