My Cope Family Tree

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  • ID: I02837
  • Name: Christopher Plunket
  • Sex: M
  • Title: Sir
  • Birth: ABT 1370 in Rathregan, County Meath, Ireland, Earl of Fingal and New Lord of Killeen
  • Death: ABT 1445 in Killeen, County Meath, Ireland, 1st Lord Dunsany, 1st Baron Killeen
  • Burial: Killeen Chauntry Church Chapel, County Meath, Ireland
  • Reference Number: 2837
  • Note:
    SIR CHRISTOPHER PLUNKETT of Rathregan (near Batterstown, Co., Meath) married in 1403, Joan, daughter and heir of Sir Luke de Cusack, and in her right, became lord of Killeen.
    The Plunkett Family were of Danish origin and possibly arrived in Ireland as early as the tenth century. Sir Chrisopher's ancestors had settled in Bewley, Co. Louth. His grandfather, Richard Plunkett had established the House of Rathregan. It is said 'when the Norman invaded Ireland the Plunketts did not join them as they knew they were going to win, but subsequently, married them and became their Bishops and Lawyers and, later, their Barons'.
    Sir Christopher Plunkett and Lady Joan had seven sons and three daughters. The eldest, John, was heir of Killeen; the second, Christopher, founded the House of Dunsany, Co. Meath; Thomas, the third son, founded the House of Rathmore, Co. Meath (between Navan and Athboy); Robert founded the House of Dunsoghly, Co., Dublin (St. Margaret's); Richard died without family; Edward founded the House of Balrath, Co. Meath (between Clonmellon and Kells); and Edmund became a priest.
    Sir Christopher and his wife erected, early in the fifteenth century, the present old church of Killeen, on the site, most probably, of its predecessor, and in the West end of the Chancel they founded a Chantry consisting of four priests to have the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered up for the souls of their ancestors and the spiritual welfare of their family.
    In 1426 Christopher received a grant of a sum of money from Henry VI, as recompense for the services he had rendered in the wars of Ireland. Before this time he was Sheriff of Meath and, in 1432, was deputy to Sir Thomas Stanley, Knt., Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.
    Sir Christopher Plunkett was a peer, not just a feudal Lord of the Manor, and was created Baron, by writ, between 1403 and 1445. (It has not been possible to find an exact date for the writ but it would probably have been 1436.)

    The first Baron on Killeen died in 1445

    Citations:

    "The History of Killeen Castle." Mary-Rose Carty, pg. 11.

    The Plunketts of Dunsany
    The Plunkett connection began with the knight Sir Christopher Plunkett (Deputy Governor of Ireland in 1432), who had come into the lands in the area through marriage in the early 1400's (with Joan Cusack, whose father held Dunsany and Killeen, Killeen by Sir Lucas de Cusack, and Dunsany by his wife, Matilde de Fleming), and two of his sons, John and Christopher. John, the eldest, was heir to nearby Killeen Castle (his family were Lords of Killeen and later became Earls of Fingall also), while Christopher was given Dunsany, becoming its first Lord (it is one of the oldest Irish titles, created by summons in 1439 under Henry VI and documentary form later under Edward IV). Family legend relates that the areas of the demesnes of the two castles was decided by a race, with Killeen, starting from higher ground, having the advantage. In the same generation, the Church of St. Nicholas ("The Abbey"), within the demesne, was reputedly build after a rift between Lady Dunsany (Anne) and Lady Killeen (Janet) - the two families had both used the church at Killeen - with the specification that it be one foot bigger in length, breadth and height than Killeen Church.
    The Castle is the longest occupied home and one of the oldest continuously inhabited buildings in Ireland, though the Lords of Dunsany have suffered on a couple of occasions, such as when the ninth Lord, elected by the Catholic peers of Ireland to assert their loyalty to the State, was imprisoned for several years in Dublin Castle before being sent to Connaught. While his family died on the journey, he was reinstated at the time of the Restoration. Later, the tenth Lord fought for James II at the Battle of the Boyne and was outlawed but the estates were restored to his successor after the Treaty of Limerick.

    Inside the Castle
    The Castle is entered through a large lobby with a finely worked ceiling, which opens into the central hallway, featuring the principal stairway and a vaulted ceiling. On the ground floor are a fine dining room, featuring portraits of past family members from over the centuries, and a substantial, well-proportioned billards room while up the stairs are the library and drawing-room. The bright and airy drawing-room has Stapleton plasterwork from 1780. The unique library, which may have been worked on by James Shiel, is one of the star features of Dunsany. Displaying a form of the "Gothic Revival" style, it has a wonderful "beehive" ceiling from the early 19th century and grained Gothic decoration. There is a fine collection of books from across the centuries, including material by the writer Lord Dunsany an the writing table at which he (and others, such as the poet Francis Ledwidge) worked. Other features include a winding secondary stairway (where a "priest's hole" formerly existed) and an old vaulted hall, built from the original 12th century kitchen and now displaying part of the Dunsany Home Collection.

    Dunsany Demesne
    As with many holdings, much of the estate of Dunsany was transferred to tenants under Ireland's unique Land Acts (originally introduced by Westminster but never in Britain), which have given the country an extraordinarily wide distribution of land ownership. The Demesne, the heart of the residual Dunsany Estate, features farmland, park and woodland (with many species, including some ancient native trees such as oak), surrounded by a Famine wall (a project to provide work for the destitute during Ireland's terrible potato famine) with three major entrances. The former main gate has a castellated appearance; this leads to the Main Avenue, which passes the Church of St. Nicholas and one of the motte mounds, and comes upon the concealed Castle suddenly in a piece of clever landscaping.
    The current main gateway has the appearance of a Gothic ruin but is a later "sham," concealing a residential gatehouse; it faces the ancient Dunsany Cross, a pilgrim cross on one of the long-distance ways for the devout. The Castle is fronted by a lawn, protected from browsing animals (though not deer!) by a well-concealed ha-ha. At the back of the demesne runs the River Skane (going from the direction of Dunshaughlin), a tributary of the Boyne. Also within the grounds are enclosed yards (farm and stables), a fine walled garden, an ice-house and wells.
    The fine Church of St. Nicholas (of Myra), locally known as "The Abby," and built on the site of an earlier building (standing in 1305), was commenced in the 1440's and holds within and around tombs of family members and local residents. It is a substantial building and the walls still stand solidly, although it has been largely disused for many years (a new church was built for local worship at Dunsany Cross) and the roof is long gone (the church is still consecrated). Within are the remnants of lofts and living spaces. There are also some of the best medieval carvings surviving in Ireland, notable on the baptismal font, and a fine carved fifteenth century tomb (with effigies of a knight and his lady, either the first or second Lord Dunsany and his wife).

    Dunsany Today
    The family, headed by the 20th Lord, Edward Plunkett, and his wife, Maria Alice de Marsillac Plunkett, still live at Dunsany. They retain a fine collection of herilooms, including an enamelled silver mug presented by Elizabeth I and the watch and cross of St. Oliver Plunkett, and some beautiful works of art, notably paintings and porcelain, though for security reasons some are no longer held at the Castle.
    From the ASSOCIATION for the PRESERVATION of the MEMORIALS for the DEAD, IRELAND, JOURNAL FOR THE YEAR 1911, ppg. 411 and 412.

    The Plunkett and Cusack Slab, Circa 1445
    No. IX is a large, fractured slab bearing two effigies, a knight and his wife, with a black-letter inscription running round the edge. Until recently this tomb was in good condition, but it was wantonly broken by some servants of an English gentleman who had taken Killeed Castle for a winter's hunding. They placed a ladder against the church wall outside, climbed up, and, from the top of the wall, hurled down stones on to the effigies with disastrous results. The length of this slab is 7 feet by 3 feet 10 inches. The effigies are cut in very low relief (like the bishop on No. V). Their heads are surmounted by a double, richly carved canopy. The lady, lying on the right of this knight, wears the bullock-hoof-shaped head-dress, and her feet rest on a cushion. The knight is represented as clean-shaven; his feet rest on a small dog. In both figures the arms are doubled up so that the hand rest flat on their chests.
    The inscription is not legible in one or two places, and in the right-hand bottom corner a portion of the slab is broken off and lost. What is legible, with the contractions expanded':--

    hic iacent corpora | Crestofori Plunket, Militis, quondam
    deputatis locum tenientis Hibernie, et Johane Cusak
    uroris sue, que fieri fecerent istam ecclesiam,
    Orate pro anima Richolai Plunket [militis qui
    multa bona dedit isti eccles]ie. Orate pro anima-
    bus Domine Elizabethe Plunket, Johanis P. senioris,
    Johanis P. junioris, Rucardu | P. senoris, Ricardi P.
    junioris et . . .
    Translation
    Here lie the bodies of Sir Christopher Plunkett, Knight,
    at one time vice-deputy of Ireland, and of Joan Cusack
    his wife, who built (caused to be made) this church. Pray
    for the soul of Sir Nicholas Plunkett, Knight, who
    granted many benefits to this church. Pray for the souls
    of Dame Elizabeth Plunkett, of John Plunkett the elder,
    of John Plunkett the younger, of Richard Plunkett the
    elder, of Richard Plunkett the younger, and of . . .

    The missing portion of the Latin inscription which appears in brackets is taken from the inscription as given in Archdall's edition of Lodge's "Peerage of Ireland," vol. vi, p. 174, where, however, the concluding few words are omitted; no mention is made in that Peerage of Dame Elizabeth, and the succeeding names on the slab, so that their relationship to Sir Christopher remains unsolved. Of Sir Christopher, Archdall supplies the following information":--

    Sir Christopher, eldest son of John Plunket, in reward of his services in the wars of Ireland, and the expenses he had been at to the great impoverishment of his fortune, had a grand of 20 marcs from King Henty VI, dated 5th November, 1426, before which time he was Sheriff of Meath, and, in 1432, was deputy to Sir Thomas Stanley, Kt., Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. In 1401 he married Joan, daughter and sole heir of Sir Lucas Cusack, Kt., Lord of Killeen, Dunsany, and Gerardstown in the County of Meath, and in her right became Lord of Killeen. In conjunction with his said wife, who died 4th March, 1441, he founded* the church of Killeen, within which church, in the west part of the chancel, they founded a chantry, consisting of four priests, to pray for their souls; and they also founded a college in the reigh of King Henry VI. Sir Christopher departed this life in 1445, and was entered in the church of Killeen, under a tomb erected for him with this inscription (as given above). He left a numerous issues, vis. seven sons and three daughters. The sons were:--
    "1. John, the eldest, succeeded at Killeen.
    "2. Sir Christopher, ancestor to Lord Dunsany.
    "3. Sir Thomas, ancestor to the Plunkets of Rathmore.
    "4, Robert, ancestor to the Plunkets of Dunsoghly.
    "5. Rowland, who died without issue.
    "6. Edward, ancestor to the Plunkets of Balrath.
    "7. Edmund, in holy orders, who died 6 July 1474.

    The Plunketts
    The origin of the Plunkett line is lost in history and there is not a clear agreed etymology for the name (often spelt "Plunket" in earlier records). The name would appear to have derived in Ireland and is only found in those descended from Irish lines. It is believed that the family are, like many Irish houses, of Danish stock, having arrived in Ireland as Norse settlement was becoming well-established, perhaps in the late 900's.
    The line of the Plunkett nobility, so prominent in the mid- and north-east, can be traced back to Johan (?) Plunket of Beaulieu (now Bewley) near Drogheda in County Louth. The Dunsany branch descended from Richard Plunkett of Rathregan in southern Meath, whose grandson, Christopher, married into the de Cusack family, who held substantial lands including Killeen and Dunsany. Christopher Plunkett was a knight and held office as Sheriff of Meath and later, Deputy Governor of Ireland; he was created as first in the continuing line of Lords of Killeen (his father-in-law had held this title by summons). His eldest son, John, was to inherit Killeen, while the second son, another Christopher, was given Dunsany (Killeen and Dunsany were twin castles of the Norman Pale, dating back to the 1180's), becoming its first Lord. Other sons took holdings at Dunsoghly, Rathmore and Balrath.

    Family Crest (individual holders may bear derivatives of the basic form) :

    Arms : Sa., a bend arg., in the sinister chief point a castle of the last. Crest : A horse passant arg. Supporters : Dexter, a pegasus per fesse or and arg., sinister, an antelope arg. collared, chained, armed and hoofed or. Motto : Festina Lente.
    5. SIR CHRISTOPHER5 PLUNKETT (RICHARD4, RICHARD3, JOHN2, CHRISTOPHER1) was born 1370 in Rathmore, Meath, Ireland, and died 1445. He married JOAN DE CUSACK 1403 in Killeen, Meath, Ireland, daughter of LUCAS DE CUSACK and MATHIDLE FLEMING. She was born Abt. 1370 in Killeen, Meath , Ireland, and died March 04, 1440/41.

    Notes for SIR CHRISTOPHER PLUNKETT:
    He was of Rathregan Meath, Ireland. He was Deputy Governor of Ireland in 1432. He came into the lands in the area through marriage with Joan Cusack, whose father held Dunsany and Killeen. He was a knight at Killeen Castle.
    DUNSANY AND DUNSANYS CASTLES:
    Dunsany Castle and Demesne are situated in the townland of Dunsay (Dun Samhnaigh), between the historic town of Trim and the village of Dunshaughlin in County Meath, Ireland. Meath ( the current county and Westmeath together) once formed a separate, fifth, province of Ireland, which was the territory of the High King (Ard Ri); today, this is all within the eastern province , Leinster. The former seat of the High Kings, Tara, is only a few kilometers away. Also nearby are the village of Kilessan the Bective Abby.
    ORIGINS: The Castle was established as a towered fortification of the Norman Pale ( an area of strong
    English control in the east of Ireland, established shortly after Strongbow's invasion) in the period 1180-1200; construction is believed to have begun in 1180-1181. The first Norman building on the site was a motte-type fortification on the mound between Castle and Abbey,believed to have been the site of the Dun( fortress) for which the area and demesne are named.
    Parts of the original building still stand- the huge foundations and the four main towers form a key part of the current structure. Much additional work has , of course, been performed over the years, especially in the 18th and 19th centuries, and current Castle is more than three times the size of the original.

    THE PLUNKETTS OF DUNSANY
    The Plunkett connection began with the knight Sir Christopher Plunkett ( deputy Governor of Ireland in 1432) , who had come into the lands in the area through marriage ( with Joan Cusack, whose father held Dunsany and Killeen), and two of his sons, John and Christopher. John, the eldest, was heir to nearby Killeen Castle ( his family were Lords of Killeen and later became Earls of Fingall also), while Christopher was given Dunsany, becoming its 1st Lord ( it is one of the oldest Irish titles, created by summons in 1439 under Henry VI; documentary form later under Edward IV). Family legend relates that the sizes of the demesnes of the two castles was decided by a race, with Killeen, starting from higher ground, having the advantage. In the same generation, the Church of St. Nicholas, within the demesne, was reputedly built after a rift between Lady Dunsany and Lady Killeen- the two families had both used the church at Killeen-with the specification that it be one foot bigger in length , breadth, and height than Killeen Church.
    The Castle is one of the oldest continuously inhabited buildings in Ireland, though the Lords of Dunsany have suffered tribulations on a couple of occasions. The ninth Lord, elected by the Catholic peers of Ireland to assert their loyalty to the State, was imprisoned for several years in Dublin Castle before being sent to Connaught; his family died on the journey. He was reinstated at the time of the Restoration. The tenth Lord fought for James II as the Battle of the Boyne and was outlawed but the estates were restored to his successor after the Treaty of Limerick.
    THE PLUNKETTS--- the line of the Plunkett nobility, so prominent in the mid-and north-east, can be traced back to Johan(?) Plunket of Beaulieu ( now Bewley) near Drogheda in County Louth. The Dunsany branch descended from Richard Plunkett of Rathregan in southern Meath, whose grandson, Christoper, married into the de Cusack family, who held substantial lands including Killeen and Dunsany. Christopher was a knight and held office as Sheriff of Meath and later, Deputy Governor of Ireland; he was created as first in the continuing line of Lords of Killeen ( his father-in-law had held this title by summons). His eldest son, John , was to inherit Killeen, while the second son, another Christopher, was given Dunsany ( Killeen and Dunsany were twin castles of the Norman Pale, dating back to the 1180's), becoming its first Lord. Other sons took holdings at Dunsoghly, Rathmore and Balrath.
    Information found on www.Dunsany.net/plunkett.htm on the internet. August 15,2002
    Christoper Plunkett of Rathregan , County Meath, and of Killeen, was son and heir of Richard Plunkett of Rathregan , by Elizabeth. He was a minor at his father's death, circa 1376, but in 1391, was sued to take up knighthood, having the necessary territorial qualification in County Meath. He is not , however, styled a knight till about 1425. From 1401 onward he is found acting as a Justice of the Peace, commissioner, in County Meath and was at one time sheriff of that county. In October 1402 he was going to England , and appointed attorneys. In 1403 he was enfeoffed of the manor of Tillahuog ( Tullaghanoge, County Meath. ) to himself and his male issue, with remainder to William and Richard, sons of John Plunkett. He had pardons at various times. He was present at a great Council at Naas between 1414 and 1419. On Feb4ruary 6 1426 he had a grand of 20 marks on account of his great expenses in the wars in Ireland. Though he is alleged by some to have become a peer at about this time, he is never styled anything but knight. He married, before October 1399, Joan, daughter and heir of Sir Luke De Cusake, with whom he had the lordships and manors of Killeen, Kilskire, Killallon, Clonmacduffe, and Clony .
    Burke's Irish Family Records 1976

    Children of CHRISTOPHER PLUNKETT and JOAN DE CUSACK are:
    6. i. JOHN PLUNKETT, b. Abt. 1403, Killeen, Meath, Ireland; d. Abt. 1445.
    7. ii. CHRISTOPHER PLUNKETT, b. Abt. 1407
    iii. ROBERT ROWLAND PLUNKETT
    8. iv. MATILDA PLUNKETT
    9. v. MAUD PLUNKETT
    10. vi. SIR THOMAS PLUNKETT, b. September 27, 1408, Rathmore, Meath, Ireland; d. June 12, 1471, Rathmore, Meath, Ireland.

    Name: Christopher Plunkett
    Sex: M
    Birth: ABT 1370 in Rathmore, Meath, Ireland
    Death: 1445
    Note:
    Note: He was of Rathregan Meath, Ireland. he was Deputy Guvoner of Ireland in 1432. He came into the lands in the area through marriage with Joan Cusak, whose father held Dunsany and Killeen. He was a Knight at Killeen Castle.
    Dunsany and Dunsany's Castles:
    Dunsany Castle and Demense are situated in the townland of Dunsany ( Dun Samhnaigh ) between the historic town of Trim and the village of Dunshauglin in County, Meath, Ireland. Meath once formed a seperate fifth, province of Ireland, which was the territory of High King (Ard Ri ) ; today, this is all wthin the eastern province, Leinster. The former seat of the High Kings, Tara. is only a few kilometers away. Also nearby are the villages of Kilessan and Bective Abby.
    Plunkett's of Dunsany;
    The Plunkett connection began with with the Knight Sir Christopher Plunkett ( Deputy Guvoner of Ireland in 1432 ), who had come into the land in the area through the marriage with Joan Cusak and two of his sons John and Christopher. John, the eldest, was heir to nearby Killeen castle.Family legend relates the sizes of the demesne, was reputedly built after a rift between Lady Dunsany and Lady Killeen the two families had both used the church at Killeen with the specification that it be one foot bigger in length, breadth and height than Killeen Church. ( His family were Lords of Killeen and later became Earls of Fingall also) While Christopher was given Dunsany, becoming it's first Lord (it is one of the oldest Irish Titles created by summons in 1439 under Henry the VI ) The castle is one of the oldest continously inhabited buildings in Ireland though the Lords of Dunsany have suffered tribulations on a couple of occasions. The ninth Lord elected by the Catholic peers of Ireland to asset theit loyalty to the state, was imprisoned for several years in Dublin castle before being sent to Connaught, his family died on the journey.He was reinstated at the time of the restoration. The tenth Lord fought for James II at the battle of the Boyne and was outlawed but the estates were restored to his successor after the treaty if Limerick.
    THE PLUNKETTS, The line of the Plunkett nobility, so prominent in the mid and north east, can be traced back to Johan Plunkett of Beaulieu ( now Bewlwy ) near Drogheda in County, Louth. The Dunsany branch descended from Richard Plunkett of Rathergan in Southern Meath, whose grandson, Christopher, married into the De Cusack family, who held substancial lands including Killeen and Dunsanny. Christopher was a Knoght and held office as Sheriff of meath and later, Deputy Guvoner of Ireland; he was created as first in the continuing line of Lords of Killeen ( his father in law had held the title by summons. His eldest son, John was to inherit Killeen while the second son, another Christopher was to inherit Dunsany

    Father: Richard Plunkett b: 1339 in Rathmore, Meath, Ireland

    Marriage 1 Joan De Cusak b: ABT 1370 in Killeen. Meath, Ireland
    Children
    Thomas Plunkett b: 27 SEP 1408 in Rathmore, Meath, Ireland

    [Observations.-Camden, in his Hibernia, writes that "Christopherus Plunket, tempore Henrici Sexti, evectus fuerat ad dignitatern Baronis Killin, quod, per uxorem, e stirpe Cusakiā haeredem, ipsi obvenerat." This passage has been frequently mistranslated; but it is obvious that the relative "quod " does not refer to the Dignitas Baronis, but to the word "Killin," the manor. of Killeen-i.e., it signifies quod manerium, not quae dignitas.

    This manor of Killeen was held by Richard Tuite of the Barons of Skryne, who, though generally summoned to Parliament [IRL], never pretended to the dignity of a peerage. Richard Tuite was summoned to a Parliament [IRL] 8 January 1309/10, and sat in a Parliament at Dublin 1323-24. His granddaughter and heir married Sir Walter de Cusake, who thus became of Killeen, and obtained seisin thereof 4 June 1351. He was summoned to Parliament [IRL] in 1374, and in [1377, 1380 and 1382). He also made no claim to peerage rank. His son and heir, Sir Luke de Cusake, left a daughter and heir Joan, who married Sir Christopher Plunket. This Sir Christopher is held by most writers to have become the first Baron Killeen circa 1426, but not only is there no authority for such a supposition, there is, on the contrary, strong evidence that the Barony was not created until 1449 or later; for in that year Christopher, grandson of the abovenamed Christopher, who is supposed to have succeeded to the Barony in 1441, is described as "Christopher Plunket, esquire, the younger, lord of Killeen." The Barony is therefore here tentatively dated 1449, It may be objected that this dating conflicts with the known ranking in 1489 of Lord Killeen above Lord Howth, whose barony is supposed to have been created circa 1440. But, as has been observed sub HOWTH, this date is almost certainly too early. In point of fact the ranking of these Irish baronies has no basis in antiquity, and as has been remarked in Appendix A in volume i, appears to rest on the importance assumed or possessed by their holders at the time of the ranking.]
    CHRISTOPHER PLUNKET, of Rathregan, co. Meath, and of Killeen, was son and heir of Richard PLUNKET, of Rathregan, by Elizabeth. He was a minor at his father's death, circa 1376, but in 1391 was sued to take up knighthood, having the necessary territorial qualification in co. Meath. He is not, however, styled a knight till about 1425. From 1401 onward he is found acting as a justice of the peace, commissioner, &c., in co. Meath, and was at one time sheriff of that countv. In October 1402 he was going to England, and appointed attorneys. In 1403 he was enfeoffed of the manor of Tillahuog (Tullaghanoge, co. Meath) to himself and his male issue, with remainder to William and Richard, sons of John Plunket. He had pardons at various times. He was present at a great Council at Naas between 1414 and 1419. On 6 February 1426/7 he had a grant of 20 marks on account of his great expenses in the wars (in Ireland). Though he is alleged by some writers to have become a peer at about this time, he is never styled anything but knight. He married, before October 1399, Joan, daughter and heir of Sir Luke DF CUSAKE, with whom he had the lordships and manors of Killeen, Kilskire, Killallon, Clonmacduffe and Clony, with the advowsons of the churches therein. Joan was living in 1432, but died before 1435. He died circa 1441, and was buried at Killeen. [CP 248-9]

    Name: Christopher (Sir) (of Rathregan Meath) Plunkett
    Sex: M
    Birth: ABT 1370
    Death: 1446
    Event: Info 1 Lord Killeen. Deputy Gov. of Ireland in 1432 plus
    Event: Info 6 See Burke's Peerage under "Dunsany" & (1970 edition) under "Fingall"

    Father: Richard (of Rathregan Meath) Plunkett b: ABT 1339
    Mother: Elizabeth

    Marriage 1 Joan Cusack
    Children
    John Plunkett b: ABT 1400 in Killeen, Meath, Ireland
    Christopher (1st Baron of Dunsay) Plunkett
    Thomas (Sir) (of Rathmore) Plunkett
    Rowland Plunkett

    Baron Dunsany
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    Baron Dunsany or Baron of Dunsany (IPA: [?d?n'se?n?]) is a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created by writ in 1439 for Christopher Plunkett. In 1461, the peerage was confirmed by letters patent. Plunkett was the uncle of Christopher Plunkett, 1st Baron Kileen (from whom the Earls of Fingall descended). His great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson, the eleventh Baron, was a follower of King James II and was outlawed after the Glorious Revolution. However, he was restored to his estates after the Treaty of Limerick but neglected the necessary measures needed to establish himself in the peerage and was not summoned to Parliament.
    His son, the twelfth Baron, conformed to the Church of Ireland but did not initiate any steps to confirm his right to a seat in Parliament. However, his son, the thirteenth Baron, had his claim to a seat in the Irish House of Lords admitted. He was succeeded by his son, the fourteenth Baron. He served as Lord Lieutenant of County Meath and also sat in the British House of Lords as an Irish Representative Peer from 1836 to 1848. His son, the fifteenth Baron, represented Drogheda in the House of Commons and was an Irish Representative Peer from 1850 to 1852. He was succeeded by his younger brother, the sixteenth Baron. He was an Admiral in the Royal Navy and also served as an Irish Representative Peer between 1864 and 1889.
    His son, the seventeenth Baron, sat as a Conservative Member of Parliament for Gloucestershire South and was an Irish Representative Peer from 1893 to 1899. He was succeeded by his son, the eighteenth Baron. He was a well-known poet, playwright and author, chiefly known for his short stories in the field of fantasy and horror. As of 2007 the title is held by his grandson, the twentieth Baron, who succeeded his father in 1999.
    The ancestral seat of this branch of the Plunkett family is Dunsany Castle in County Meath in the Republic of Ireland.
    The title is listed in "Burke's Peerage and Baronetage" and "Debrett's Peerage and Baronetage" as Baron of Dunsany, but in "The Complete Peerage" as Baron Dunsany without the of. In either case, the holder of the title is called Lord Dunsany in all but the most formal contexts.

    [edit] Barons of Dunsany (1439)
    Christopher Plunkett, 1st Baron Dunsany (1410-1463)
    Richard Plunkett, 2nd Baron Dunsany (d. c. 1480)
    John Plunkett, 3rd Baron Dunsany (d. 1500)
    Edward Plunkett, 4th Baron Dunsany (d. 1521)
    Robert Plunkett, 5th Baron Dunsany (d. 1559)
    Christopher Plunkett, 6th Baron Dunsany (d. 1564)
    Patrick Plunkett, 7th Baron Dunsany (d. 1601)
    Christopher Plunkett, 8th Baron Dunsany (1603)
    Patrick Plunkett, 9th Baron Dunsany (1595-1668)
    Christopher Plunkett, 10th Baron Dunsany (d. 1690)
    Randall Plunkett, 11th Baron Dunsany (d. 1735)
    Edward Plunkett, 12th Baron Dunsany (1713-1781)
    Randall Plunkett, 13th Baron Dunsany (1739-1821)
    Edward Wadding Plunkett, 14th Baron Dunsany (1773-1848)
    Randall Edward Plunkett, 15th Baron Dunsany (1804-1852)
    Edward Plunkett, 16th Baron Dunsany (1808-1889)
    John William Plunkett, 17th Baron Dunsany (1853-1899)
    Edward John Moreton Drax Plunkett, 18th Baron Dunsany (1878-1957)
    Randal Arthur Henry Plunkett, 19th Baron Dunsany (1906-1999]
    Edward John Carlos Plunkett, 20th Baron Dunsany [b 1939




    Father: Richard Plunket II b: ABT 1339 in Rathregan, County Meath, Ireland, Sat in the Parliaments and great council, Rathregan, County Meath, Ireland
    Mother: Elizabeth Plunket b: BET 1339 AND 1343 in Rathregan, County Meath, Ireland

    Marriage 1 Johanna de Cusack b: ABT 1370 in Heiress of Killeen and Dunsany Castles, County Meath, Ireland
    • Married: BET OCT 1402 AND 1403 in Killeen, County Meath, Ireland
    Children
    1. Has Children John Plunket b: ABT 1404 in 2nd Lord Baron Plunkett of Killeen, Ballymolgen, Killeen Castle, Rathmore, County Meath, Ireland
    2. Has Children Christopher Plunkett b: ABT 1407 in Dunsany Castle, 1st Lord Baron Plunkett of Dunsany
    3. Has Children Thomas Plunkett b: 27 SEP 1408 in 1st Lord Plunkett of Rathmore, County Meath, Ireland
    4. Has Children Robert Rowland Plunkett b: ABT 1410 in Lord Dunsoghly/Lord Dunsoghlin, County Dublin, Ireland
    5. Has No Children Richard Plunkett b: AFT 1412 in Rathmore, County Meath, Ireland
    6. Has No Children Edward Plunkett b: ABT 1414 in Ancestor to the Plunketts of Balrath, County Meath, Ireland
    7. Has No Children Edmond Plunkett b: ABT 1416 in Rathmore, County Meath, Ireland, A Priest in Holy Orders
    8. Has No Children Elizabeth Plunkett b: ABT 1418 in Rathmore, County Meath, Ireland
    9. Has No Children Maud Plunkett b: ABT 1420
    10. Has No Children Anne Plunkett b: ABT 1422
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