The Olney Connection

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  • ID: I31694
  • Name: Warren OLNEY , Sr.
  • Surname: Olney
  • Given Name: Warren
  • Suffix: , Sr.
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 11 Mar 1841 in Albia, Monroe, Iowa, USA
  • Death: 2 Jun 1921 in San Francisco, California, USA
  • Burial: Mountain View Cemetery, Oakland, Alameda, California, USA
  • Ancestral File #: 1PHB-BM2
  • _UID: C0BE09776312854D95594D17AA01B44238A9
  • Census: 1860
  • Census: 1880 Oakland, Alameda, California, USA
  • Census: 1900 Oakland, Alameda, California, USA
  • Census: 1910 Oakland, Alameda, California, USA
  • Census: 1920 Oakland, Alameda, California, USA
  • Note:
    CAPTAIN WARREN OLNEY SR., COMPANY G, 65TH USC INFANTRY
    (1841 Iowa - 1921 California)
    Original Member of the California Commandery
    Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

    (WO IV has picture of him with President Teddy Roosevelt, standing on the steps of a public building in Oakland)

    Warren Olney Sr. was born March 11, 1841 in Albia, Monroe County, Iowa the eldest of eight children born to William and Elizabeth Ann (Green) Olney Jr.. He descends from a family whoŁus military service can be traced back to the Revolutionary War in Rhode Island with OlneyŁus Additional Regiment commanded by Colonel Jeremiah Olney, Major Coggeshall Olney, and Captain Stephen Olney. William Jr. moved to Van Buren County, Iowa in the spring of 1838 where he commenced business as a carpenter and builder where he married Eliza Geen on July 18, 1839. Her father owned a cabin and land near Albia, Iowa. They later moved to Monroe county and took a claim of 160 acres, where he lived while working at his trade in Albia. The Olney family lived in a one-room log cabin among the Sac and Fox Indians. Eliza was afraid of them, although they were never mistreated by them. In 1846 the family moved to Jefferson County, Iowa and lived with William Olney I for two years. In 1848 they moved back to the claim in Albia and William Jr. built a cabin near the woods where they lived. In June 1852, he moved to Pella, Marion County, where he continued at his business, and for about ten years his family lived on a farm, which was worked by his sons. Central College (a.k.a. Central University of Iowa), was established in Pella, and William Jr. sent his sons there to school. Warren Sr. attended Pella and studied law at the University of Michigan prior to the Civil War.

    When the war began Warren Sr. left college and enlisted as a Private on May 21, 1861 and He enrolled on June 10, 1861 as a Private in Company B, 3rd Iowa Infantry USV which he served as until January 21, 1864 when he was discharged for promotion.

    History of the 3rd Regiment, Iowa Infantry:
    Organized at Keokuk and mustered in June 8, 1861. Left State for Hannibal, Missouri, June 29. Attached to Dept. of Missouri, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, District of Memphis, Tennessee, Department of Tennessee, to September, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, District of Jackson, Department of Tennessee, to November, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, Right Wing 13th Army Corps, Department of Tennessee, to December, 1862. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Army Corps, Army Tennessee, to January, 1863. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Corps, to July, 1863. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 13th Corps, to August, 1863. 1st Brigade, 4th Division, 17th Corps, to March, 1864.

    SERVICE.-March into Missouri July 1-12, 1861. Skirmish at Utica July 3. Hagar's Woods July 8 (3 Cos.). Monroe Station July 9 and 11 (Cos. "A," "F," "H" and "K"). At Chillicothe, Missouri, and guarding Hannibal & St. Joseph R. R. till August 7. Moved to Brookfield August 7 (7 Cos.), and against Green's forces at Kirksville August 15-21. (3 Cos. on Expedition to Paris, August.) Operations against guerrillas in North Central Missouri August 30-September 7. Action at Shelbina September 4. Expedition to Fonda against Green's forces September 8-9. Moved to Liberty September 12. Action at Blue Mills September 17. Operations in North Missouri till October 18. At Quincy, Illinois, November. Regiment reunited. Moved to Benton Barracks and duty there till December 26. Guard duty at Mexico and on Northern Missouri Rail Road until March, 1862. Ordered to Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. Battle of Shiloh April 6-7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Mississippi, April 29-May 30. March to Memphis, Tennessee, June 2-July 21, and duty there till September 6. Moved to Bolivar September 6. Skirmishes at Bolivar and Middleburg September 21. Duty at Bolivar till October 4. Battle of the Hatchie , Metamora, October 5. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November, 1862, to January, 1863. Worsham's Creek November 6. Guard Memphis & Charleston Railroad till March, 1863. Duty at Memphis till May. Expedition to the Coldwater April 18-24. Moved to Vicksburg, Mississippi, May 17-20. Attack on Steamer Crescent City, near Island 82, Mississippi River, May 18. Siege of Vicksburg , Mississippi, May 22-July 4. Advance on Jackson, Mississippi, July 5-10. Siege of Jackson July 10-17. Assault on Jackson July 12. Duty at Vicksburg till November. Moved to Natchez, Mississippi, November 18. Return to Vicksburg December 16, and duty there till February, 1864.

    On January 21, 1864 Warren Sr. was discharged for promotion as Captain of Company G, 65th US Colored Infantry. This regiment completed itsŁu organization on March 11, 1864 from the 2nd Missouri Colored Infantry and attached to Department of Missouri until June 1864. It was then ordered to the District of Morganza, Louisiana, where it performed garrison duty until May 1865. The regiment was then moved to Port Hudson, Louisiana, performing garrison duty there and at Baton Rouge and in Northern District of Louisiana until it was mustered out January 8, 1867. Warren mustered out August 15, 1865 after giving his country over 4 years of continuous service.

    On September 11, 1865 he was married to Mary Jane Craven (January 30, 1842 Iowa - 1928 California), whom he had met while at Pella. He also completed his studies at the University of Michigan and received a LL.B. in 1868. In 1868 they then sailed from New York through the isthmus of Panama and up to San Francisco. Warren Sr. was admitted to the bar in 1869, became a prominent lawyer in San Francisco, with the frims of Olney, Chickering, and Thomas, the firm he started with his son Olney and Olney, was a trustee and attorney for Mills College, elected Director of California Title Insurance and Trust Company, and served as President of the of San Francisco Dock Company.

    The following is taken from Warren Olney and the Club, published in the SIERRA Magazine, February/March 1978, also see URL Sierra Club:

    Warren Olney Sr. was an avid hiker and fisherman and by 1889 met the naturalist John Muir. They met through a mutual friend, William Keith, the well-known landscape and portrait painter who was also an enthusiastic outdoorsman. When Muir visited San Francisco from his fruit ranch at Martinez, Keith was apt to send Olney word, and the three would meet in KeithŁus studio to talk about ŁSthe mountainsŁT. Soon the number of people drawn to these conversations (and, one suspects, to MuirŁus presence) grew beyond the capacity of KeithŁus rather cramped and cluttered studio, and the meetings were moved to OlneyŁus more spacious law office in the nearby First National Bank Building at 101 Sansome Street. Among those attending were Joseph LeConte, J. H. Senger, William Dallam Armes, Cornelius Beach Bradley and John C. Branner, all faculty members at Stanford or Berkeley. On Saturday, May 28, 1892, a formal meeting was held in OlneyŁus office to organize a "Sierra Club". A week later there was another meeting at the same site. Twenty-seven charter members signed the articles of incorporation that Olney had drawn up. Muir was elected president, Olney vice-president. OlneyŁus office continued to serve as headquarters during the first year of the ClubŁus existence. Its first conservation effort, a successful campaign to remove Yosemite Valley from state control and add it to the newly created national park surrounding the valley, was mounted there.

    OlneyŁus tenure with the Sierra Club culminated in one of the most dramatic conservation conflicts in the ClubŁus and in the nationŁus history: the struggle for Hetch Hetchy Valley. Olney had fought the private interests controlling the Bay AreaŁus water supply. He believed that the best way to remove that supply from private hands and place it in municipal ownership was for the city of San Francisco to acquire rights to the water of the Tuolumne River and to dam it where it passed through Hetch Hetchy, a miniature Yosemite Valley in the upper reaches of Yosemite National Park. Olney admitted the natural beauty of the site, but argued: Any other source will cost the tax payers of San Francisco, already heavily burdened as a result of the recent earthquake and fire, ten to twenty million dollars more than this one. He pointed out that only the Tuolomne, of all major Sierra streams, had no significant claims on its water, though private interests were moving to make such claims. He noted that those interests were also opposing acquisition of Hetch Hetchy and felt they were losing Club members who opposed the project. The Hetch Hetchy Project was approved by a majority of San Francisco voters and by such national figures as Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot. But it was strongly opposed by John Muir, Will Colby and others of OlneyŁus friends in the Club. They believed it would not only sacrifice a site of great natural beauty but would establish a precedent for invading the integrity of the national parks in the name of utilitarian necessity. When a poll of the members resulted in a vote of 589 to 161 against his position, Olney resigned after seventeen years of dedicated service.

    The ultimate victory of his Hetch Hetchy views hardly compensated for the painful loss of intimacy with Muir, Colby and others of whom he was deeply fond. There was one consolation. HeŁud helped establish the principle of forthright dissent among Club members; and had been instrumental in creating an organization that was to expand in significance far beyond his most hopeful dreams. A group of Sierra Club members have establish a fund to commemorate the contribution of Warren Olney to the founding of the organization.

    Warren Sr. was also involved in California politics and in 1903 he had agreed to run for Mayor of Oakland only if he received the nomination by both the Republican and Democratic Conventions, which he did receive, and served as Mayor of Oakland (1903 - 1905). He was not a man easily fazed and during the 1906 earthquake awoke his household in Oakland, and after determining that there was no immediate damage or need for his help, he famously went back to bed and slept until daybreak. Warren Sr. died June 2, 1921 in San Francisco, California.

    He was a member of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR#10007) and was elected an Original Companion of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (CA#4862). He was an active member of MOLLUS until his death and his three sons were hereditary members of MOLLUS as well. Descendants of Captain Warren Olney Sr., and descendants of his siblings, are eligible for hereditary membership in the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (MOLLUS - founded by Civil War officers on April 15, 1865) and the Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States (founded in 1899 as the auxiliary to the MOLLUS). For more information on either or both organizations, please visit each organization's national website:

    http://www.suvcw.org/mollus/mollus.htm
    Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States

    http://suvcw.org/mollus/dollus/home.htm
    Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States

    As a member of MOLLUS Warren wrote about his war time experiences and presented them at Commandery meetings. The following are two that he contributed:

    http://suvcw.org/mollus/warpapers/CAv1p66.htm
    ŁSSHILOHŁT, SEEN BY A PRIVATE SOLDIER, by Captain Warren Olney, 65th U.S. Colored Infantry, A Paper Prepared and Read Before the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, May 31, 1889.

    http://suvcw.org/mollus/warpapers/CAv1p291.htm
    NAGGING THE SOUTH, by Captain Warren Olney, 65th U.S. Colored Infantry. Paper Read Before the California Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, November 20, 1896.

    Children of Warren Olney Sr. and Mary Jane Craven (6 children):

    1) Martha Olney (September 11, 1869 California - December 12, 1869 California).

    2) Warren Olney Jr. (October 15, 1870 San Francisco, California - March 25, 1939 Berkley, California) m.Mary McLean (July 25, 1873 CA - August 12, 1965 Hayward, CA). Following in his fatherŁus footsteps studying law he earned an AB in 1891 from the University of California, an AB in 1892 from Harvard, a LL.B. in 1894 from Hastings College of Law.. He was an Assistant Professor of Law, Hastings College of Law (1895-1904) and a Lecturer, School of Jurisprudence, University of California (1904-1907). He later earned a LL.D. in 1919 from the University of California.

    Warren Jr. practiced law in San Francisco originally with his father as Olney and Olney; Olney, Pringle, and Mannon (1907-1910); Page, McCutchen, Knight, and Olney (1910-1912); and McCutchen, Olney, and Willard (1913-1919). For the W. P. Ry. Co. he served as general attorney (1907-1913), general counsel (1913-1915), receiver (1915-1916), and again general counsel (1916-1919). He was also the attorney for the regents of the University of California (1911-1919). Warren Jr. was appointed to the State Supreme Court of California as Associate Justice (1919- 1921), and when his first term was up he visited all 58 counties to talk with voters--no mean feat in the 1920's. He was re-elected, but left the court after a time to resume private practice with McCutchen, Olney, Mannon, and Greene (1921-1939). He still had a public life, though, and was Special Master for one of the federal courts in the RCA case, which was part of the development of the red and blue networks and the FCC.

    Although he did not also follow in his fatherŁus footsteps with service in the active military he did serve as a Member of the State Registration Bureau having charge of the Registration of the Draft in California, as Chairman of the District Exemption Board for Division 1 (1917-1918), and Chairman of the State Military Welfare Commission (1917-1918). Warren Jr. was also a hereditary member of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (CA#10739) and a member of the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR#29121).

    Children of Warren Olney Jr. and Mary McLean (3 children):

    2.1) John McLean Olney (February 23, 1902 Santa Rosa, California - May 15, 1994 Santa Rosa, California), m.Constance Caldwell (March 25, 1905 - March 20, 1991), +children.

    2.2) Warren Olney III (February 25, 1904 California -December 20, 1978 Alameda, California), m. Anna Elizabeth Bazata (June 5, 1905 Paia, Hawaii - March 4, 2000 San Francisco, California). Warren III was an attorney, and worked as an Assistant Attorney General for Earl Warren, when Warren was District Attorney of Alameda County and Attorney General of California. He was a prosecutor during Prohibition and participated in the famous raid on the gambling ships anchored in Santa Monica Bay. During World War II, he served in the South Pacific with the Marines. After that, he was general counsel for Governor Earl Warren's crime commissions, designed to combat illegal gambling.

    Warren III was appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as an Assistant Attorney General to oversee the Criminal Division of the United States Department of Justice. When the Supreme Court decisions on civil rights began to come down, he proposed creating the Civil Rights Division to handle the cases. In 1956, he wrote, and Congress passed, the first civil rights bill since the Civil War. During that time, he was mindful of his grandfather's service in the 65th. From 1956 to 1966, Warren III was Director of the Administrative Office of the Federal Courts, by appointment of Chief Justice Earl Warren.

    Children of Warren Olney III and Anna Elizabeth Bazata (3 children):
    2.2.1) living Olney, m.Anderson, +children.
    2.2.2) living Olney.
    2.2.3) Warren Olney IV (living), is Host and Executive Producer of To the Point and Which Way, L.A.&#00063;, both of which can be heard on KCRW, he is considered to be an authority on South Land affairs. He is a graduate of Amherst College and developed and taught laboratory courses at USC. Warren IV is married to Marsha Temple, an Attorney at Law, and they have four children and five grandchildren. See <http://www.moretothepoint.com/bio.html>

    2.3) Sarah Constance Olney (living), m.Herbert Bartholomew (1912-1955), +children.

    3) Mary C. Olney (September 19, 1872 California - June 15, 1948 Alameda Co., California), m.Louis Bartlett (1872 - 1960), +children.

    4) Thomas More Olney (June 13, 1872 California - March 14, 1946 Kern Co., California), m. Coralie Selby (1875 - 1953), +children. He was a Contractor and a hereditary member of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (CA#14601), +children.

    5) Ethel Rockwell Olney (June 2, 1876 California - July 25, 1964 Tulare, California), m Robert E. Easton (1875-1968), +children.

    6) William Olney (November 1, 1878 California - September 3, 1945 Alameda, California), m.Minnie Ray Wilson (1879-1959), +children. He was an Attorney at Law and a hereditary member of the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (CA#14602), +children.

    Sources:
    1) Membership Records of the MOLLUS.
    2) WhoŁus Who in America, Volume.I 1897-1942, Chicago: A.N. Marquis Co., c1943, p.916.
    2) A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, V.III, by Frederick H. Dyer, c1908, p.1734
    3) Wikipedia: Warren Olney
    4) Warren Olney and the Club, SIERRA Magazine, February/March 1978.
    5) W. Olney Memoriam, Alameda Co., CA, California Historical Quarterly, Volume.18 No.2 (June 1939)
    6) Family Input from Warren Olney IV, see http://www.moretothepoint.com/bio.html
    7) Olney Family & Finance Links, by Laverne Edward Olney (LONLEY@CHARTER.NET)
    See http://users.chartertn.net/lolney/homepage.html
    ----------------------------------------------------------

    ii. Born on 11 Mar 1841 in Albia, Monroe Co, IA. Warren died in San in Francisco, CA in 1921, he was 79.3. Occupation: Lawyer.

    "He was raised in Iowa and went to Pella to college. He enlisted in the Union Army during the Civil War. When he returned he married Mary Craven, whom he had met while at Pella. In 1868, they sailed from N.Y. through the isthmus of Panama and up to San Francisco. Mr. Olney Sr. became a prominent lawyer in San Francisco. He also was a trustee and attorney for (unknown value) College. He started a tradition of Warren Olney lawyers, for his son Warren Jr., and his grandson Warren III followed him in the lawyer field. Warren and Mary Olney had six children: -Martha (b. 1869), Warren II (b. 1870), Mary (b. 1872), Thomas (b. 1874), Ethel (b. 1876), William (b. 1878)"

    Bef. 1868 when Warren was 26, he married Mary Craven3, in prob Pella, Marion Co, IA.

    Olney, Warren, 1841-1921.
    Warren Olney, 1841-1921. [Santa Barbara&#00063; Calif., 1961].
    UCB Bancroft x F860.O6
    CHS CHS BIOG .O16
    CSL State Lib CT275 O515 A3 California Non Circ

    Sierra Club, history, conservation, wilderness, California, John Muir, Joseph Le Conte, Leconte, Colby, Edward Taylor Parsons, Marion Randall Parsons
    "Sierra Club History."
    Warren Olney and the Club
    Warren Olney was drawn to California by reports of spectacular mountain scenery. Born in Iowa, he had fought in the Civil War and studied law at the University of Michigan before journeying west in 1868, the year John Muir arrived in San Francisco.
    Unlike his future friend and colleague (who looked askance at the city and immediately asked a passerby for the quickest route to the mountains), Olney had a wife and child to support. He settled down to practice law. But he was an avid hiker and fisherman, and by the time he met Muir in 1889, he had seen much of the Sierra and the Coast Range. They met through a mutual friend, William Keith, the well-known landscape and portrait painter who was also an enthusiastic outdoorsman. When Muir visited San Francisco from his fruit ranch at Martinez, Keith was apt to send Olney word, and the three would meet in Keith’2 CONC ountains’2 CONC ’2 CONC e meetings were moved to Olney’2 CONC uilding at 101 Sansome Street. Among those attending were Joseph LeConte, J. h. Senger, William Dallam Armes, Cornelius Beach Bradley and John C. Branner, all faculty members at Stanford or Berkeley. On Saturday, May 28, 1892, a formal meeting was held in Olney’2 CONC nize a "Sierra Club". A week later there was another meeting at the same site.
    Twenty-seven charter members signed the articles of incorporation that Olney had drawn up. Muir was elected president, Olney vice-president.
    Olney's office continued to serve as headquarters during the first year of the Club's existence. Its first conservation effort, a successful campaign to removeYosemite Valley from state control and add it to the newly created national park surrounding the valley, was mounted there.
    These were years of intense activism prophetic of the Club’2 CONC onferences were held and attended in San Francisco, Sacramento and Washington. ’2 CONC er from Senator Perkins [U.S. Senator George C. Perkins, a charter member of the Club],’2 CONC y wrote Muir, ’2 CONC f the Tahoe National Forest]. When President Jordan [David Starr Jordan, president of Stanford, also a charter member] was
    in Washington he did what he could in the way of establishing boundaries. He found the Secretary of Interior and the Commissioner of the Land Office in hearty accord with our scheme.
    Olney and Muir established a close personal relationship on family hiking and camping trips and Club outings.
    Olney's tenure with the Sierra Club culminated in one of the most dramatic conservation conflicts in the Club's and in the nation's history: the struggle for Hetch Hetchy Valley. As mayor of Oakland (he had agreed to run only if he received both the Republican and Democratic nominations). Olney had fought the private interests controlling the Bay Area's water supply. He believed that the best way to remove that supply from private hands and place it in municipal ownership was for the city of San Francisco to acquire rights to the water of the Tuolumne River and to dam it where it passed through Hetch Hetchy,a miniature Yosemite Valley in the upper reaches of Yosemite National Park. Olney admitted the natural beauty of the site, but argued: Any other source will cost the tax payers of San Francisco, already heavily burdened as a result of the recent earthquake and fire, ten to twenty million dollars more than this one. He pointed out that only the Tuolomne, of all major Sierra streams, had no
    significant claims on its water, though private interests were moving to make such claims. He noted that those interests were also opposing acquisition of Hetch Hetchy and felt they were ’2 CONT The Hetch Hetchy Project was approved by a majority of San Francisco voters and by such national figures as Theodore Roosevelt and Gifford Pinchot. But it was strongly opposed by John Muir, Will Colby and others of Olney's friends in the Club. They believed it would not only sacrifice a site of great natural beauty but would establish a precedent for invading the integrity of the national parks in the name of utilitarian necessity. When a poll of the members resulted in a vote of 589 to 161 against
    his position, Olney resigned after seventeen years of dedicated service.
    The ultimate victory of his Hetch Hetchy views hardly compensated for the painful loss of intimacy with Muir, Colby and others of whom he was deeply fond. There was one consolation. He'd helped establish the principle of forthright dissent among Club members; and had been instrumental in creating an organization that was to expand in significance far beyond his most hopeful dreams.
    A group of Sierra Club members have established a fund to commemorate the contribution of Warren Olney to the founding of the organization.

    *This article appeared in slightly altered form in the 1978 February/March issue of SIERRA Magazine.
    ********************************************************************************************
    A NATIONAL REGISTER OF THE SOCIETY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION PRINCIPAL EVENTS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION.
    page 134
    WARREN OLNEY. Oakland. Cal. (10007). Son of William and Eliza (Green) Olney; grandson of William and Charlotte (Tanner) Olney; great-grandson of Stephen Olney, Captain Rhode Island Militia. [p.134]

    Life's Work: Lawyer, San Francisco, CA

    _______________________

    Many of the descendents of Warren Olney and Mary Craven were supplied by Polly (Mrs. John M.) Olney, Santa Rosa, CA.
    ------------------------------------------
    From: Jim Golub [mailto:JAYGO214@aol.com] I'm researching Warren Olney (1841-1921) for a biography I hope to publish. I am not a member of the family. I have found possible discrepancies in accepted "facts" concerning his early life and am seeking details to tie things together. Of particular interest is his meeting with Mary Craven. Details connecting them could give leads to his early education. Family history says she met her future husband in college in Pella, Marion County where he went to Central College (aka Central University of Iowa) in 1859-60. However the 1860 Federal census for Washington County places Mary there in "sch" (I presume that means "school") in that year. There was Washington College and attendant "academy," which origins predated Central College's, at that place at that time. Further, Central College has no record of her there though that is not conclusive in itself. Then in 1860 Olney removed to Missouri, returning in 1861 just before the outbreak of the Civil War in which he immediately enlisted. Warren Olney was well educated before he went to Central (serving as teacher and school superintendent in Pella in 1857 and 1858 respectively) so I'm betting both he and Mary attended Washington College, presided over by James R. Doig and which existed from 1854 to 1864 (dates vary some depending on source) when it was destroyed in a storm. At least Olney believed in a close enough association with Doig to call on him for a letter of recommendation during the Civil War. I have been able to find no other possible point of connection between them beyond possibly the school. As an aside Warren and Mary were married in her father's home in Washington, again suggesting close ties with that place. They were wed by one Rev. Charles Thompson. Information on him could be helpful. If Mary's and the Rev.s religious beliefs could be established that might provide a clue as Warren's upbringing was Baptist and Doig and Washington College were Presbyterian. Those details could be very telling if not entirely conclusive. I hope you may have some information that can help me. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. I'm sorry to have gone a bit long here but hoped to provide some background and verify what I am about.
    -------------------------------------------
    Mountain View Cem, Oakland, Alameda, CA

    Olney Martha 0/0/1866 0/0/1869 13
    Olney Mary C. 0/0/1842 0/0/1928 13
    Olney Thomas More 0/0/1875 0/0/1946 13
    Olney Warren 0/0/1841 0/0/1921 13

    ---------------------------------------------

    From: douglas niermeyer [mailto:momollus@sbcglobal.net] Sent: Sunday, July 23, 2006 11:01 PM
    My name is Douglas Reed Niermeyer and I am a Past Commander-in-Chief of a military hereditary organization called the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States. MOLLUS was founded April 15, 1865 the day that President Abraham Lincoln died by Federal Officers from the Civil War, which nearly 12,000 officers eventually became members, and today MOLLUS is continued on by descendants of officers. Warren Olney Sr., Captain of Co.G 65th US Colored Infantry was one of our original members and all three of his sons were also hereditary members.
    I am from MO and the which the 65th US Colored Infantry was rasied here and became interested in Captain Olney due to his service in the 65th. Last year we republished two papers Warren contiributed from his experiences during the Civil War:
    <http://suvcw.org/mollus/warpapers/CAv1p66.htm> ŁSSHILOHŁT, SEEN BY A PRIVATE SOLDIER, by Captain Warren Olney, 65th U.S. Colored Infantry, A Paper Prepared and Read Before the California Commandery of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, May 31, 1889.
    <http://suvcw.org/mollus/warpapers/CAv1p291.htm> NAGGING THE SOUTH, by Captain Warren Olney, 65th U.S. Colored Infantry. Paper Read Before the California Commandery, Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States, November 20, 1896.
    We are now in the process of composing biographies on Captain Olney and his family who were hereditary members. I ran across some data that you posted online and wanted to let you know of this biography project. I listed Warren's death date as June 2, 1921 instead of March 27, 1917 as 1921 is what is listed in Who's Who and I also saw him living in the 1920 census so I assume the 1917 death date must be a replicated error. Could you or another family member confirm what is correct&#00063;
    Please look over the attached draft and I was hoping that someone in the family may be able to email me a JPG scan of a photo of Warren, possibly one of him in his uniform if the family has one. Here is another biography of one of our original members who is wearing his MOLLUS membership medal (the one with the blue, white, and red ribbon) to give you an idea of what the finished biography may look like:
    <http://suvcw.org/mollus/art046.htm> LIEUTENANT GENERAL ADNA ROMANZA CHAFFEE SR., USA (1842 Ohio - 1914 California)
    Lastly, descendants of Captain Warren Olney Sr., are eligible for hereditary membership in the MOLLUS and the Dames of the Loyal Legion of the United States (DOLLUS founded in 1899 as the auxiliary to MOLLUS). The principal objectives of MOLLUS are to foster military and naval science, promote allegiance to the United States government, perpetuate the memory of those who fought to preserve the unity and indivisibility of the Republic and to honor the memory and promote the ideals of President Abraham Lincoln. For more information please visit the Missouri Commandery website: <http://suvcw.org/mollus/mo.htm>
    I look forward to hearing from you.
    Loyally,
    Doug Niermeyer
    Past Commander-in-Chief of MOLLUS
    Recorder of the MO Commandery of MOLLUS
    -----------------------------
    Title: The clergy and the conquest of the Philippines: [by Warren Olney]
    Author: Olney, Warren, 1841-1921.
    Publication Info: [Oakland, Calif.&#00063; : s.n., 1899]
    http://www.hti.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx&#00063;type=simple&rgn=full+text&c=philamer&cc=philamer&idno=adt4330.0001.001&q1=olney&submit=Go
    -------------------------------------------
    [EASTON, Ethel Olney, ed.].
    Warren Olney 1841-1921.
    Privately published: [San Francisco, 1961.]. 8vo, original crimson linen, spine & front cover giltlettered, in plain white dustwrapper. xiii, 300 pp. Frontispiece reproducing Olney's Sequoia bookplate, two portraits after photographs, & one facsimile. Dustwrapper sun-tanned; the volume as new. First Edition; produced for Olney's family and friends in a small edition. Inscribed on front free endpaper by the editor: "Agnes v.A. Noble / from Aunt Ethel (E.O.E.) / May, 1961." (Agnes Van Antwerp Noble was a San Francisco grande dame and amateur playwright.) Warren Olney is best remembered now because he, John Muir, and others founded the Sierra Club in Olney's law offices in San Francisco. Years later Olney was expelled from the organization because he supported the flooding of Hetch Hetchy Valley in Yosemite National Park. His life had additional interesting incidents, not least his presence at the Battle of Shiloh during the Civil War, about which his memoirs are here included.
  • Change Date: 29 Apr 2010 at 01:00:00



    Father: William OLNEY Jr b: 23 May 1817 in Gerry, Chautauqua, New York, USA
    Mother: Elizabeth Ann GREEN b: 30 Jun 1821 in Greenfield, Saratoga, New York, USA

    Marriage 1 Mary CRAVEN b: 1842 in Iowa, USA
    • Married: 11 Sep 1865
    Children
    1. Has No Children Martha OLNEY b: 11 Sep 1866
    2. Has Children Warren OLNEY Jr. b: 15 Oct 1870 in Healdsburg, California, USA
    3. Has Children Mary C. OLNEY b: 19 Sep 1872 in Healdsburg, California, USA
    4. Has Children Thomas More OLNEY b: 13 Jun 1874 in Healdsburg, California, USA
    5. Has Children Ethel Rockwell OLNEY b: 18 Jan 1876 in California, USA
    6. Has Children William OLNEY b: 1 Nov 1878 in California, USA
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