NC Pearce, Alexander, Cameron, and Bradley

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  • ID: I1046
  • Name: Bastian Lentz Sr
  • Surname: Lentz
  • Given Name: Bastian
  • Suffix: Sr
  • Nickname: Johann Sebastian
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 26 Aug 1737 in Village of Postroff, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
  • Death: 3 May 1808 in Rowan County, North Carolina
  • Burial: 1808 Organ Lutheran Church Cementary, Salisbury, Rowan County, North Carolina
  • _UID: 765383B75EE34B4B9081DF5E54FA54CF9938
  • Baptism: 26 Aug 1735 Evangelical Luthern Church of Hirschland, Postroff, Nassau-Saarworden, Germantown
  • Immigration: 14 Sep 1753 Philadelphia, arrived from Germany
  • NATU: 1765 Autumn in Berks County, Rockland Township
  • Event: Revolutionary War Event 1777
  • Note:
    Y-DNA Research

    LANCE-LENTZ: Hans Petrus Lentz > Bastian Lentz > John Jacob Lentz > Charles Lentz > Michael Lentz > Harlie Michael Lance > JWL (FTDNA Kit 2009)

    ============================

    FF-DNA Research

    BRADLEY-LENTZ: BAB and REL are 5th cousins 2 times removed. Their common ancestors are Hans Petrus Lentz and Anna Susannah Magdalena Klein..
    a) Hans Petrus Lentz > Johann Theobald Lentz Sr > Dewalt Lentz Jr > John Elisha Lentz > Luther Agustas Lentz Sr > Bettie Cutchin Lentz > BAB (Kit No: 223262)
    b) Hans Petrus Lentz > Bastian Lentz Sr > Margaret Lentz > Sophia Sifford > Sarah Peeler > Philip M Lentz > Henry Lentz > Ellis Preston Lentz > REL (Kit No: ??)

    ============================

    Birth: Aug. 26, 1737
    Baden-Württemberg, Germany
    Death: May 3, 1807
    Rowan County
    North Carolina, USA

    Wife was Anna Margaretha Bechtel, born in Pennsylvania as inscribed at base of tombstone.---no additional formation.

    Bastian's parents were:
    Johann Peter (Hans Petrus) Lentz and Anna Magdalena (Klein) Lentz, both of which died in Germany.

    Burial:
    Organ Lutheran Church Cemetery
    Salisbury
    Rowan County
    North Carolina, USA

    Maintained by: Leaton Clark
    Originally Created by: Dorothy Kirby Carroll
    Record added: Mar 21, 2003
    Find A Grave Memorial# 7280193

    ============================

    NARRATIVE ON THE PERSONAL HISTORY OF B- BASTIAN LENTZ
    BY Alan Lentz http://www.gencircles.com/users/alentz/2/data/5

    B-BASTIAN LENTZ, Sr.
    FIRST GENERATION IN AMERICA

    B- Johann Sebastian Lentz, Sr., was baptized on 26 Aug 1735 in a Lutheran church in a little European village named Postroff, which was populated mostly by Germanic families. It is possible that 26 Aug 1735 was also the date of his birth, since babies were often baptised on the day they were born.

    Actually, at that time there was no Germany in the sense of a single, unified country. Unification did not occur until 1871. Before 1871, what became known as the nation of Germany was composed of many German-speaking fiefdoms or ministates owned by various German royal families. In 1735, the area around Postroff itself was in a region belonging to the Counts of Nassau and was known as the Grafschaft of Nassau- Saarwerden. The area has a long and complicated history. Today, Postroff lies in the northwestern part of the French Province of Alsace, known as the Departement of Bas Rhin. (Readers interested in more detail on this history should read pages 1-10 of "Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America" by Annette Kunselman Burgert.)

    (SEE DOCUMENT NO. 1--A reproduction of the original handwritten entry in the Kirchenbuch (Churchbook) of the baptismal record for Johann Sebastian Lentz, accompanied by a transliteration of the old German handwriting and full English translation.)

    As shown on the baptismal records, his name at birth was Johann Sebastian Lentz. After his arrival in America, he dropped not only the "Johann" but also usually the "Sebastian" and became known as "Bastian Lentz." Variations and misspellings of his name are often seen in the old records. For example, Bostian Lentz, B. Lensz, Bastiann Lintz, Bastinn Lench, Boston Lance, and others. In order to avoid confusing readers, I will refer to him as B- Bastian Lentz, Sr. except in rare instances when I may refer to one of the variants. In the source entries themselves, however, I will use exactly whatever spelling appears in that source.


    THE LOCATION OF POSTROFF

    In 1735/1753, there was no unified Germany, and the area where Postroff is located was in the independent German state of Nassau-Saarwerden (Grafschaft Nassau-Saarwerden). This area was lost to the French in WWI and is now in the Departement Bas-Rhin (Nieder-Rhein) of France (former Deutsch Elsass) near a city named Fenetrange (French) or Vinstingen (German). The area lies within the present-day French province of Alsace.

    Map "A" shows the precise location of the village of Postroff at the time, and Map "B" shows the location of the area on a present-day map. On the latter, find the towns of Sarre-Union and Sarrebourg. The location of the village of Postroff is about half-way between these two towns.

    THE "PUSH" AND THE "PULL"
    -- WHY OUR IMMIGRANT ANCESTORS LEFT GERMANY FOR AMERICA

    The more we learn about conditions that had prevailed in the area of Postroff for so many years the less we wonder why people there would want to leave and the more we wonder why they did not leave even sooner. There is an inertia in human behavior which is not easily overcome. Either crisis conditions at home (the push), or a powerful attraction from abroad (the pull), is required before people will act. In the simplest terms, the theory holds that migrants may be impelled to leave their homelands by circumstances that push them into fleeing intolerable conditions. Conversely, the lure of real or imagined opportunities in another land moves people to seek the better life.

    The push may be a sudden event, such as the potato famine in Ireland which led thousands to flee to America. Or the push may come from more slowly moving forces, such as overcrowding. In the last half of the 18th century and the first half of the 19th, Europe's population grew by about 75 percent.


    NARRATIVE OF BASTIAN LENTZ, SR. (December 1967)
    By J.P. Lentz, 2010 Trail 5, Burlington, North Carolina, 27215
    Retyped by Jason Pearce (b 1972, Raleigh, North Carolina)

    Bastian Lentz, Sr. arrived in Philadelphia, PA, by boat in 1753, settled near Hertz Lutheran Church, Rockland Township, Berks County, PA, took the Oath of Allegiance July 17, 1777, is listed six times in PA Archives Vol. 5 as Captain Bastian Lentz, was mustered in as Captain on September 27, 1777. He paid taxes in Berks County from 1760 through 1778.

    His wife was Mareretha (probaby Margaret), and may have been a Bechtel, or Klein, or Klop, or Hartmann. Children: Margaret, Bastian, Jr. 1760, Peter 1762, Dewald 1766, Adam 1768, Michael, Elizabeth the wife of Will Sifferd, Catherine the wife of John Hornberger 1776, Jacob 1777, and Maria. Margaret married Abraham Sifferd. Jacob married Mary Yoast.

    Bastian Lentz, Jr. was the first Lentz to receive land in North Carolina, was married and head of the household at age 18. His son Abram (Abraham) lost the farm by signing a mortgage for a friend. I am descended from Jacob Lentz.

    Bastian Lentz, Sr. made Will 1807 and depart about that time. His widow married Wilhem Schmetter (Smathers) in 1809. Bastian Lentz, Sr. was the second to receive land one month after his son in 1778 in North Carolina. He paid taxes in PA last in 1778 and arrived in NC the same year.

    Bastian Lentz (believed to be Jr.) helped start Old Organ Lutheran Church in 1774 (the stone building). Jacob Lentz drove a team in a wagon train hauling sea shells from Fayetteville, NC, to the church site to burn to make the lime for the morter before the building was finished in 1794. The building still stands.

    Bastian Lentz, Sr. and Jr. both had farms along the Rowan-Cabarrus County line. Charles Lentz 1803, son of Jacob, married Susana Simmon(s), believed to descend from the New Bern settlement of 1710. We have a lot of "lost" people to find here. Rowan deed book number 14, page 381, Bastian Lentz, Sr. sells to "his brother Devalt Lentz, Sr." for 10 pounds, 50 acres... They owned farms that joined. Both attended Old Organ Lutheran Church in Rowan County, North Carolina.

    ==========================================

    The M. Lentz named on the 1809 Rowan County Marriage Bond with William Schmithers (Smathers) is actually Margaret, widow of JOHN Lentz. I was able to identify her through Mecklenburg and Rowan county deeds, Rowan County court minutes, and the Rowan County estate file of John Lentz.

    Kathy Gunter Sullivan
    Apr 18 8:05 PM GMT
  • Change Date: 7 Feb 2015 at 19:16:22



    Father: Hans Petrus Lentz b: 18 Jan 1711 in Postroff, Germany Nassau-Saariverder
    Mother: Anna Susannah Magdalena Klein b: 1711 in Postroff, Germany Nassau-Saariverder

    Marriage 1 Anna Margaretha Bechtel b: 1737 in Berks County, Pennsylvania
    • Married: ABT 1758 in Pennsylvania
    Children
    1. Has Children Bastian Lentz Jr b: 5 Mar 1759 in Pennsylania
    2. Has Children Peter Lentz Sr b: 29 Mar 1761 in Rockland Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania
    3. Has No Children Elizabeth Lentz b: ABT 1765 in Pennsylvania
    4. Has Children Dewalt Lentz b: 26 Jun 1766 in Berks County, Pennsylvania
    5. Has No Children Adam Lentz b: 2 May 1768 in Berks County, Pennsylvania
    6. Has No Children Anna Catherine Lentz b: 15 Aug 1776 in Berks County, Pennsylvania
    7. Has Children John Jacob Lentz b: 1777 in Berks County, Pennsylvania
    8. Has Children Margaret Lentz b: ABT 1778 in Pennsylania
    9. Has No Children Michael Lentz b: ABT 1780 in North Carolina
    10. Has No Children Maria Lentz b: ABT 1781
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