Ancestors of Malu Del & Tahlia Elphia McDonald

Entries: 62439    Updated: 2016-07-14 04:19:08 UTC (Thu)    Owner: Patrick Joseph McDonald

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM

  • ID: I3248
  • Name: Benjamin MILLIKEN
  • Prefix: *
  • Given Name: Benjamin
  • Surname: MILLIKEN
  • Suffix: Sr. ("the Founder")
  • Sex: M
  • _UID: BB1A53E76AA4034DB9D8D185717889C48A83
  • Change Date: 26 NOV 2009
  • Birth: 5 AUG 1728 in Boston, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.
  • Note:
    from Ridlon's SACO VALLEY SETTLEMENTS AND FAMILIES:

    BENJAMIN, (4) b. Aug. 5, 1728 (bpt. May 29, 1729, in Scarborough); was m. three times; first, Nov. 17, 1746, to Sarah Smith, of Scarborough; second, Sept. 9, 1754, to Elizabeth Banks, of said town; third, to Phebe Jordan, Dec. 3, 1766. By these he had eighteen children; four by Sarah, five by Lizzie, and nine by Phebe. He began his somewhat remarkable business career in his native town, where he owned a large, gambrel-roof house, and store in which he traded, on the Dunstan Landing road. He was an owner of lands in Rowley, Canada, which had been granted to some of those who had served in the expedition of 1696 -, but when, by running the boundary line between Massachusetts and New Hampshire, these lands were found to be in the latter province, he, with other petitioners, was granted, in 1761, a township, seven miles square, east of the Saco River, in lieu of the one of which they had been dispossessed. He was one of three who proceeded to lay out the township (now Bridgton, ME) and on presenting a plan of the same to the General Court they obtained confirmation of their grant June 25, 1765. Finding the timber on these lands too far from a market, Milliken sold out and invested in lands adjacent to other lands owned by him on Union river in eastern Maine. He had lost his lands in Scarborough by the mortgage held by Wheelwright and Althrope, of New York, and in 1764 made Trenton the seat of operation. He was granted a Mill privilege there with timber lands adjoining, and with his wife and daughter and thirty men went down in a vessel owned by Ephraim Dyer and built a saw-mill there on a stream that empties into Union river. The conditions of his grant required him to have his mill fit for service within six months from the date, 1 Aug 1764, and as it was raised between Sept. 2d and Oct. 12th of that year, he evidently fulfilled his agreement. In his deposition of 1796, Mr. Dyer testified that he carried down about four hundred pounds' worth of provisions and other stores., that he remained and helped the Millikens near a fortnight, during which time the men made use of his vessel to live in until they had built a house. This 'house" was a camp built against a huge boulder named by an early surveyor the "Punch Bowl," and a daughter of Benjamin Milliken, [Abigail] then only fourteen years of age, afterwards Mrs. Lord, cooked the first meal there ever prepared by a white woman in the township. As there were thirty-two workmen employed on the mill a large quantity of food must have been consumed, and as Ephraim Dyer stated that two women went down in the vessel with the builders, it has been supposed that one of them was the mother of this lassie but this could not have been the fact, for her father married Elizabeth Banks in 1754, only ten years before the mill was built, and would have a daughter by her fourteen years of age at that time. Abigail daughter by the first wife, Sarah Smith, being born in 1750, was fourteen when the mill was erected, and if the statements and da, were correctly given -- and there are excellent authorities to verify it -- she was the first white girl to put the kettle on in Trenton. This saw-mill built by the Millikens for Thomas Milliken was part owned was unwisely located and did not prove a success; it was known as "Folly Mill " and was abandoned. They afterwards built a double saw-mill on another site, and here, in old Trenton, Benjamin Milliken carried on his lumber and milling business successfully for many years. He owned a vessel and shipped much of his manufactured lumber Connecticut. As Mr. Milliken had expressed Tory sentiments, and as feeling was running high when the Revolutionary war broke out, fearing for his safety and that of his family, he was persuaded by friends to join the English at Castine. When peace was declared he removed to New Brunswick and12 Aug 1784, with about one hundred Royalists, known as the Penobscot Association, received a grant of land from the [British] government, said grant comprising the town plot of St. Andrews, the now famed summer resort, and extending westerly up the St. Croix river, the boundary between Maine and New Brunswick, to the town of St. Stephen. His son Benjamin received a lot in the same grant; the numbers these lots were, respectively, 129 and 131, fronting on the St. Croix River, about a mile cast of the present town of St. Stephen. Shortly after the location of these lands he left St. Andrews and went to a place ten miles westward, on the shore of St. Andrews Bay, called Bocabec. Here he built a house, the cellar of which is still visible, and a shipyard, where he built vessels, the remains of which may now be seen. Here he passed the remainder of his eventful life, and here his grave is pointed out in a spot where some of his family were also interred. When we contemplate the history of this man we are moved to feelings of pity, for the unconquerable courage and spirit of enterprise displayed by him in the unfavorable vicissitudes he experienced were worthy of greater success than he achieved. He must have been a person great force of will and almost unlimited resources, for, undaunted a undismayed, he grappled with formidable obstacles which he either out-flanked or overcame. He was possessed of an ample supply of the kind of stuff of which, under proper opportunities, great generals made; and had he espoused the cause of the colonists as warmly as some of his kindred, he would have won his epaulets in our struggle for independence. But he was not, unfortunately for him, on the winning side. His estate in Maine was confiscated and he was, evidently, comparatively poor when he began the "struggle for existence" the third time. He was a pioneer of old Scarborough. a pioneer of Trenton and founder of Ellsworth, and a pioneer at St. Andrews. Many misleading statements concerning this man and his children have been made, but we have derived our data principally from authentic sources and an intelligent member of the Milliken family now living in New Brunswick, who has visited the locality of his last earthly home, his grave, and copied from his own Bible the records of his family. Hence we are able to present in connected form the salient features in the history of one about whose motives and behavior there has been much speculation. He has been called "Royalist Ben," "Tory Ben," and "Runaway Ben," but from good authority, we are ready to state that Benjamin Milliken was a man of noble character, who was prompted to make the sacrifices he did from what to him was principle.

    *There is quite a romantic story about one of the daughters of Benjamin Milliken. A captain [Varden] in the British navy during the Revolution, while at Castine, became enamored with this Milliken girl, then living in her father's family there, and at one time left his vessel and went on shore to visit her; and for neglect of duty was cashiered and lost his commission. He married the young lady either at Castine or in New Brunswick, and settled near Mr. Milliken's business seat and home at a place now known as Varden's Point where the Varden mansion, in which the gallant captain and his wife lived, is now standing. Mrs. Jellison calls the name of Captain Varden's wife Euphemia, but the name does not appear in the family record. Another daughter married a Hanson whose descendants are living in Now Brunswick; and another became the wife of Orange Seelye, brother of Stewart Seelye, who was husband of Rebecca Milliken.

    ===

    from "Loyalists to Canada The 1783 Settlement of Quakers and Others at Passamaquoddy" by Theodore C. Holmes (p. 172)

    Milliken, Benjamin. He lived on the Union River in Maine and was a Loyalist ship builder and owner of saw mills. During the early years of the Revolutionary War he suffered attacks by the Rebels. He served as a pilot on British Ships and was taken prisoner by Colonel John Allan and a band of Indians. Benjamin Milliken's property was confiscated by the American Rebels during the war. He was a grantee at St. Andrews and a grantee with the Port Matoon Association, and was at St. Andres in 1786. Two of his sons-in-law were Loyalists."

    ===

    Information from Leana Randall from Susanville, CA dated 11 Sep 1999

    Benjamin was outspoken in his support for George III and was forced to flee with other loyalist to New Brunswick, and on 12 Aug. 1984 received two grants of land in St. Andres N.B.

    Benjamin died in 1791 in Charlotte County, New Brunswick, Canada intestate and his estate was inventoried by John Baldwin, John Henson, and Robert Vardon. He is buried in St. Patrick's Parish, New Brunswick, Canada.

    From an article in "The Courier" of 12 Sep 1878 comes a description of how Benjamin was imprisoned by the Americans on a frigate in Maine. The British fleet arrived and the Americans drove their own fleet onto the shore, released the prisoners, burned the ships and escaped into the woods.

    Rebecca was born that same night (2 Oct 1779). Benjamin returned home to find that the Americans had driven his cattle into his kitchen, had slaughtered them and had left the "offal" rotting on the floor. The house was looted.

    With Susan or Sarah Smith he had 4 children, wife Elizabeth 5 children, with Phebe 9 children. Founder of Ellsworth, ME in 1763.

    Benjamin Milliken was known to have expressed Tory sentiments during the American Revolution. As feelings were running high, and fearing for his family's safety, he was persuaded by friends to join the British at Castine. He subsequently removed to New Brunswick, and on 12 Aug 1784, with about one hundred others, known as the "Penobscot Association Loyalists," received two grants of land from the government. Their town grant comprised the town plot of St. Andrew's, the now famous summer resort; and their farm lots under separate grants included several tracts extending from Bocabec westerly along the coast to St. Stephen, with an additional tract on the St. Croix River, above what is now Milltown.

    ===

    from Joan Milliken Finn

    Re: Maria Milliken, you have the right info on her. She is the daughter of Benjamin (6) and Betsy Fullerton. This Benjamin is son of Benjamin (5) and Lucy Banks who settled at the "mouth of the river" of Ellsworth. Benjamin (5) is brother to my Edward, father of Joseph and Nathaniel. Maria had five children but none listed in the book.

    There are Rays in this book but no John. Philip J. of Surry m. Phebe Ray, daughter. of Robert and Eddie Ray. Philip's sister, Jane, m. Jesse Ray, they lived in Surry also. Robert Milliken (7) m. widow Ann Ray of Surry and had two children by her, Allen and Robert.
    1
  • Baptism: 29 MAY 1729 Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A. 1
  • PROP: lands granted to members of the 1696 expedition BEF 1761 Rowley, AB, Canada 1
  • PROP: lands in the new township 7 miles square, east of the Saco River 1761 Bridgton, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
  • Note: Ridlon writes that he was one of three men who laid out the township (Bridgton, ME) and that he received confirmation of the grant from the General Court on 25 June 1765. "Finding the timber on these lands too far from a market, Milliken sold out and invested in lands adjacent to other lands owned by him on Union River in eastern Maine. He had lost his lands in Scarborough by the mortgage held by Wheelwright and Althrope, of New York, and in 1764 made Trenton the seat of his operation. He was granted a mill privilege there with timber lands adjoining, and with his wife and daughter [Abigail] and thirty men went down in a vessel owned by Ephraim Dyer and built a saw-mill there on a stream that empties into Union River." This passage confirms the foundation of what is now Ellsworth, ME. "In his deposition of 1796, Mr. Dyer testified that he carried down about four hundred pounds' worth of provisions and other stores; that he remained and helped the Millikens near a fortnight, during which time the men made use of his vessel to live in until they had built a house. This 'house' was a camp built against a huge boulder named by an early surveyor 'Punch Bowl,' and a daughter of Benjamin Milliken [Abigail] then only fourteen years of age, afterwards Mrs. Lord, cooked the first meal there ever prepared by a white women in the township. As there were thirty-two workmen employed on the mill, a large quantity of food must have been consumed, and as Ephraim Dyer stated that two women went down in the vessel with the builders, it has been supposed that one of them was the mother of this lassie; but this could not have been the fact, for her father married Elizabeth Banks in 1754, only ten years before the mill was built, and would not have a daughter by her fourteen years of age at that time. Abigail, daughter by the first wife, Sarah Smith, being born in 1750, was just fourteen when the mill was erected, , and if the statements and dates were correctly given -- and there are excellent authorities to verify them -- she was the first white girl to put the kettle on in Trenton." This was the mill called "Folly Mill" and another was later built, and on this latter site Benjamin carried on his lumber and milling business for many years. 1
  • Event: first permanent settler of Ellsworth Misc 1763 Ellsworth, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
  • Note:
    SPRAGUE'S JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY

    Speech [given in Ellsworth, ME] by the Hon. Clarence Hale, 12 September 1912

    The first settlers came here [to Ellsworth] in 1763, when Governor Sullivan, in his history, says there were only about ten thousand people in the Maine district. They came from Richmond's Island, Biddeford, Scarborough and Falmouth, and made their homes upon Union River. Melatiah Jordan, one of the founders of this church, came at that time. Theodore Jones came then and settled upon the Milliken lot, where this church [the Ellsworth, ME Congregational Church] now stands, and where the whole of the village was afterwards built. I have seen the plan made by Mr. Deane in 1810, which shows the houses and lots.

    The only county road when this church was formed had been laid out but a few years before from Surrey to Ellsworth, and on to Sullivan. The county was new, Hancock and Washington Counties were taken from Lincoln County in 1789. Cumberland and Lincoln having been formed in 1760, and taken from York County, which embraced the whole Gorges domain, by the Massachusetts Bay Charter. In 1691 York extended over what is now the whole of the State. And these five counties made up Maine. This was the State that appears upon the map in Governor Sullivan's history of Maine, published in 1795. In the very year when Ellsworth was settled, the treaty of Paris had been made, which closed the door of French contention and settled forever the fear of Indian depredations in the Maine towns.

    ===

    THE MILLIKENS OF ELLSWORTH, MAINE

    by Gail Milliken

    Since I am a relocated native Ellsworth Mainer, I have been following Mr. Silsby's column [in the Ellsworth American newspaper] for several weeks now and I have found that he has not gone back far enough in Ellsworth's history. The Millikens were the original founders of Ellsworth.

    When I was about 13 years old, right after my mother, sister and myself relocated back to Ellsworth from Bangor, we attended the Ellsworth bicentennial celebration. The city manager was at the public address system on the raised-up stage, patriotically decorated, and announced that since this was the bicentennial celebration of the founding of Ellsworth that he was going to read to the crowd a brief history of its founding.

    The city manager spoke of a family of Millikens who came down from Presque
    Isle [sic] and put five sawmills on the Union River.

    When my grandfather was young, the Milliken family owned land from Branch Pond, all of Christian Ridge Road all the way to the Bangor Road and then up the Bangor Road to almost the Merrill apple orchards.

    After all that land was stripped of all the good usable timbers, the land was divided up among the family and this is how J. C. Milliken Realty first came into business.

    Over the years, piece by piece all that land was either sold or given to family members.

    During my grandfather's lifetime, he suffered much hardship after losing the original homestead dwelling to fire but he rebuilt.

    My grandfather Gardiner Edwin Milliken, was the city's garbologist for years. Between him and my uncle, Harold "Piggy" Milliken, they raised prized pigs and won many blue ribbons at the Blue Hill Fair. Now there is nothing left of the legacy of the founding Millikens, even out of the minds of the citizens of Ellsworth, and they had a rich history. If not for the need of virgin timber for our sailing ships, there would not be an
    Ellsworth. Just a few short years after those sawmills and lumber beams came to Ellsworth, George Washington needed lumber for his ships and Ellsworth provided that lumber and many a shipyard along our coast was building his navy. But there is nothing to let the citizens of Ellsworth or the Milliken descendants in Hancock County know of this rich history.

    We should be proud of the heritage of the founding Millikens.

    Gail N. Milliken lives in Ellsworth.

    ===

    HISTORY OF ELLSWORTH
    by Albert H. Davis

    "Of these [first settlers on the Union River], Benjamin Milliken was the most prominent. He is referred to as 'the first permanent settler.'"

    ===

    SACO VALLEY SETTLEMENTS AND FAMILIES by Rev. G. T. Ridlon

    Ridlon writes (p. 1023) that Benjamin Milliken of Scarborough, ME was one of three men who laid out the township of Bridgton, ME and that on 25 Jun 1765 he received confirmation of a grant there from the Massachusetts General Court.

    "Finding the timber on these lands too far from a market, Milliken sold out and invested in lands adjacent to other lands owned by him on Union River in eastern Maine. He had lost his lands in Scarborough by the mortgage held by Wheelwright and Althrope, of New York, and in 1764 made Trenton the seat of his operation. He was granted a mill privilege there with timber lands adjoining, and with his wife and daughter [Abigail] and thirty men went down in a vessel owned by Ephraim Dyer and built a saw-mill there on a stream that empties into Union River. In his deposition of 1796, Mr. Dyer testified that he carried down about four hundred pounds' worth of provisions and other stores; that he remained and helped the Millikens near a fortnight, during which time the men made use of his vessel to live in until they had built a house. This 'house' was a camp built against a huge boulder named by an early surveyor 'Punch Bowl,' and a daughter of Benjamin Milliken [Abigail] then only fourteen years of age, afterwards Mrs. Lord, cooked the first meal there ever prepared by a white women in the township. As there were thirty-two workmen employed on the mill, a large quantity of food must have been consumed, and as Ephraim Dyer stated that two women went down in the vessel with the builders, it has been supposed that one of them was the mother of this lassie; but this could not have been the fact, for her father married Elizabeth Banks in 1754, only ten years before the mill was built, and would not have a daughter by her fourteen years of age at that time. Abigail, daughter by the first wife, Sarah Smith, being born in 1750, was just fourteen when the mill was erected, and if the statements and dates were correctly given -- and there are excellent authorities to verify them -- she was the first white girl to put the kettle on in Trenton. This was the mill called 'Folly Mill' and another was later built, and on this latter site Benjamin carried on his lumber and milling business for many years. He owned a vessel and shipped much of his manufactured lumber to Connecticut."
    2 3 4 5 6
  • Residence: BET 1775 AND 1783 Castine, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
  • Note:
    SACO VALLEY SETTLEMENTS AND FAMILIES by Rev. G. T. Ridlon

    "As Mr. Milliken had expressed Tory sentiments, and as feeling was running high when the Revolutionary War broke out, fearing for his safety and that of his family, he was persuaded by friends to join the English at Castine."

    ===

    from LOYALISTS TO CANADA

    "He lived on the Union River in Maine, and was a Loyalist ship builder and owner of saw mills. During the early years of the Rev War he suffered attacks by the Rebels. He served as a pilot on British ships and was taken prisoner by Colonel John Allan and a band of Indians. Benjamin Milliken's property was confiscated by the American Rebels during the war. He was a grantee at St Andrews and a grantee with the Port Matoon Association, and was residing at St Andrews in 1786. Two of his sons-in-law were Loyalists."
    7 8
  • PROP: Penobscot Association grant lands from British government 12 AUG 1784 Saint Andrews, NB, Canada
  • Note:
    SACO VALLEY SETTLEMENTS AND FAMILIES by Rev. G. T. Ridlon

    "When peace was declared he removed to New Brunswick, and 12 August 1784, with about one hundred Royalists, known as the Penobscot Association, received a grant of land from the government, said grant comprising the town plot of St. Andrews [NB], the now famous summer resort, and extending westerly up the St. Croix River, the boundary between Maine and New Brunswick, to the town of St. Stephen. His son Benjamin received a lot in the same grant; the numbers of these lots were, respectively, 129 and 131, fronting on the St. Croix River, about a mile east of the present town of St. Stephen [NB]. Shortly after the location of these lands he left St. Andrews and went to a place ten miles westward, on the shores of St. Andrews bay, called Bocabec. Here he built a house, the cellar of which is still visible, and a shipyard, where he built vessels, the remains of which may now [ca 1894] be seen. Here he passed the remainder of his eventful life, and here his grave is pointed out in a spot where some of his family were also interred."

    ===

    supplied by Nancy O'Connor

    NB Grant Book Database, Provincial Archives of New Brunswick, Canada


    Vol: A, p. 176, Grant #96
    Original Province of Reg. NS, NS Reg. Date: 3 Aug. 1784, NB Reg. Date: 21 May 1785, Accompanying Plans: No, Acerage: 100 acres, Place & Co.: Passamaquoddy, Sunbury Co., Comment: Penobscot Assoc.

    Vol: A, p. 165, Grant #95
    Milliken, Benjamin - Original Province of Registration: NS, NS Reg. Date: 1784/06/01, NB Reg. Date: 1785/05/21, Accompaning Plan: No, Acreage: 0, Place & Co.: St. Andrews, Sunbury Co., Comments: Town Lot
    7 8 9 10
  • Occupation: ship builder AFT 1784 Bocabec, Charlotte, NB, Canada 7 8
  • Residence: AFT 1784 Bocabec, Charlotte, NB, Canada 7
  • Residence: 1786 Saint Andrews, NB, Canada 8
  • Death: ABT 1791 in Saint Andrews, NB, Canada
  • Note:

    Nancy O'Connor docnano@aol.com gives his date of death as 22 OCT 1791 in St. Patrick's Parish, Charlotte, NS Canada. I would be very interested to find out any more about Benjamin Milliken's death or place of burial.
    8
  • Burial: ABT 1791 Saint Andrews, NB, Canada
  • ADDR: St. Patrick's Parish 8
  • Event: politically a "Tory" or "Royalist" Misc
  • Note: He was called "Royalist Ben," "Tory Ben" and "Runaway Ben" by his opponents. 11



    Father: Edward MILLIKEN b: 6 JUL 1706 in Boston, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.
    Mother: Abigail NORMAN b: 26 JUL 1710 in Boston, Suffolk, MA U. S. A.

    Marriage 1 Sarah SMITH b: ABT 1726 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    • Married: 17 NOV 1746 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    • Note: Broderbund's FTM "Marriage Index: Massachusetts, 1633-1850" lists their marriage date as 19 Oct 1747 in Boston, Suffolk, MA. 12 1
    Children
    1. Has Children Mary MILLIKEN b: 17 SEP 1748 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    2. Has Children Abigail MILLIKEN b: 29 SEP 1750 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    3. Has No Children Susanna MILLIKEN b: 10 JUL 1752 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    4. Has No Children Benjamin MILLIKEN b: 15 MAY 1754 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.

    Marriage 2 Elizabeth BANKS b: 11 JAN 1734/5 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    • Marriage Bann: 26 AUG 1754 in York, York, ME U. S. A.
    • Note: Charles Banks gives this date as their marriage date in his NEHGR article. 13 14
    • Married: 9 SEP 1754 in York, York, ME U. S. A. 1
    Children
    1. Has Children Sarah MILLIKEN b: 24 JAN 1756 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    2. Has Children Joseph MILLIKEN b: 10 NOV 1758 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    3. Has Children Elizabeth Tarbox MILLIKEN b: 10 DEC 1760 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    4. Has Children Benjamin MILLIKEN b: 9 JAN 1763 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    5. Has Children Elias MILLIKEN b: 24 AUG 1765 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.

    Marriage 3 Phebe JORDAN b: in Saco, York, ME U. S. A.
    • Married: 3 DEC 1766 in ME U. S. A.
    • Note: marriage date according to Ridlon 1
    Children
    1. Has Children Phebe MILLIKEN b: 30 AUG 1767 in Scarborough, Cumberland, ME U. S. A.
    2. Has Children Dorcas MILLIKEN b: 9 APR 1769 in Union River, Ellsworth, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    3. Has Children Norman MILLIKEN b: 11 JUL 1771 in Trenton, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    4. Has No Children Dominicus MILLIKEN b: 1 MAR 1773 in Trenton, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    5. Has No Children Rachel MILLIKEN b: 15 MAY 1775 in Ellsworth, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    6. Has Children Dominicus MILLIKEN b: 15 JUN 1777 in Trenton, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    7. Has No Children Rebecca MILLIKEN b: 15 AUG 1779 in Ellsworth, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    8. Has No Children Charlotte MILLIKEN b: 23 JAN 1781 in Ellsworth, Hancock, ME U. S. A.
    9. Has Children Joanna MILLIKEN b: 3 JAN 1783 in St. George, Charlotte, NB Canada

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Ridlon's Saco Valley Settlements (Complete)
      Title:
      Saco Valley Settlements and Families

      Saco Valley Settlements and Families. Historical, Biographical, Genealogical, Traditional, and Legendary. Embracing The Most Important Events in the Towns on the Saco River, from their Plantation to the Present, with Memorials of the Families and Individuals Instrumental in their Settlement, Advancement and Prosperity. by Rev. Gideon T. Ridlon, Sr. (Privately Published, The Lakeside Press, Portland, ME: 1895)
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Repository:
        Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library
        Dural, NSW 2158
        AUSTRALIA

      Page: p. 1023
    2. Abbrev: Ellsworth, History of
      Title: Albert Hopkins Davis, THE HISTORY OF ELLSWORTH, MAINE (Lewiston Journal Printshop, Lewiston, ME
      1927)
      Repository:
        Name: Ellsworth Public Library
        Ellsworth, ME 04605
        U. S. A.

      Repository:
        Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library
        Dural, NSW 2158
        AUSTRALIA

      Page: p. 17
    3. Abbrev: Sprague's Journal
      Title:
      Sprague's JOURNAL OF MAINE HISTORY
      Repository:
        Name: Bangor Public Library
        Bangor, ME 04401
        U. S. A.

      Repository:
        Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library
        Dural, NSW 2158
        AUSTRALIA
    4. Abbrev: Info from Gail Milliken
      Title:
      Gail Milliken
      gnrose@cox.net
      1820 South Main Street, #208
      Salt Lake City, UT 84115
      U. S. A.
      Telephone (801) 463-3836

      Newspaper article by Gail Milliken, provided by Charlotte Betts Smith of NC. (Ellsworth American newspaper)
    5. Abbrev: Ridlon's Saco Valley Settlements (Complete)
      Title:
      Saco Valley Settlements and Families

      Saco Valley Settlements and Families. Historical, Biographical, Genealogical, Traditional, and Legendary. Embracing The Most Important Events in the Towns on the Saco River, from their Plantation to the Present, with Memorials of the Families and Individuals Instrumental in their Settlement, Advancement and Prosperity. by Rev. Gideon T. Ridlon, Sr. (Privately Published, The Lakeside Press, Portland, ME: 1895)
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Repository:
        Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library
        Dural, NSW 2158
        AUSTRALIA

      Page: pp. 1023-4
    6. Abbrev: Hancock County, Maine Survey
      Title: Samuel Wasson, A Survey of Hancock County, Maine (Augusta, ME: Sprague, Owens & Nash, Printers to the State, 1878)
      Page: p. 22
    7. Abbrev: Ridlon's Saco Valley Settlements (Complete)
      Title:
      Saco Valley Settlements and Families

      Saco Valley Settlements and Families. Historical, Biographical, Genealogical, Traditional, and Legendary. Embracing The Most Important Events in the Towns on the Saco River, from their Plantation to the Present, with Memorials of the Families and Individuals Instrumental in their Settlement, Advancement and Prosperity. by Rev. Gideon T. Ridlon, Sr. (Privately Published, The Lakeside Press, Portland, ME: 1895)
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Repository:
        Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library
        Dural, NSW 2158
        AUSTRALIA

      Page: p. 1024
    8. Abbrev: Loyalists to Canada
      Title: Loyalists to Canada, The 1783 Settlement of Quakers and Others at Passamaquoddy by Theodore C. Holmes (Picton, Press, Rockport, ME: 1992)

      Documented, hardcover book with dust jacket, colored end sheets, 13 maps, photos, illustrations, etc. Acid-free paper. 350 pages. More than 100 pages of documented biographies, with 6602 names in everyname index. Story of the Quakers, Baptists, and other Loyalists and pioneers who settled in the Passamaquoddy region before and after the Revolutionary War. Includes early settlers of Campobello, St. Andrews, St. Stephen, Beaver Harbour and Eastport. Published by Picton Press.

      This book documents the story of the Quakers, Baptists, and other Loyalists who settled in the Passamaquoddy region. 6,602 names in everyname index. Includes early settlers of Campobello, St. Andrews, St. Stephen, and Beaver Harbour, New Brunswick, and Eastport, Maine.
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Page: p. 172
    9. Abbrev: Diverting History of a Loyalist Town
      Title: The Diverting History of a Loyalist Town, A Portrait of St. Andrews, New Brunswick by Grace Helen Mowat (University Press of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB: 1932)

      he little town that the author writes about with such understanding and affection is St.Andrews, New Brunswick, founded in 1783 by an adventurous group of United Empire Loyalists who were exiled from the States at the close of the Revolutionary war.

      These faithful British Subjects were not part of the thirty thousand that were organized under Sir Guy Carleton in New York, and who settled in a more easterly section of what was then Nova Scotia; but were in fact a small group, which had been living at Fort George at the mouth of the Penobscot river, firmly believing themselves to be within the province of Nova Scotia.

      When word came to London that the St. Croix must be the boundary and not the Penobscot, the settlement was dismantled piece by piece. All the framework, lumber and materials, everything they needed at Fort George, they would need on the banks of St. Croix.

      The Diverting History of a Loyalist Town is the fascinating story of these intrepid individuals, and of how St. Andrews grew and prospered, retaining to this day the same peace and unspoiled beauty which met the eye that fine morning so many years ago.
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.
    10. Abbrev: NB Canada Provincial Archives
      Title: New Brunswick, Canada Provincial Archives

      Marysville Place
      20 McGloin Street
      Fredericton, New Brunswick
      E3A 5T8
      Canada

      Marysville Place
      P. O. Box 6000
      Fredericton, NB
      E3B 5H1
      Canada

      General Information: (506) 453-3742
      Reception: (506) 453-3742
      Fax: (506) 444-4400
      Internet Web Site: http://www.gnb.ca/0099/index-e.asp

      Media Officer: Judy Cole
    11. Abbrev: Ridlon's Saco Valley Settlements (Complete)
      Title:
      Saco Valley Settlements and Families

      Saco Valley Settlements and Families. Historical, Biographical, Genealogical, Traditional, and Legendary. Embracing The Most Important Events in the Towns on the Saco River, from their Plantation to the Present, with Memorials of the Families and Individuals Instrumental in their Settlement, Advancement and Prosperity. by Rev. Gideon T. Ridlon, Sr. (Privately Published, The Lakeside Press, Portland, ME: 1895)
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Repository:
        Name: Patrick McDonald Personal Library
        Dural, NSW 2158
        AUSTRALIA

      Page: pp. 1024-5
    12. Abbrev: FTM
      Title: Family Tree Maker's Family Archives (Genealogy.com)
      Page: No. 231 "Marriage Index: Massachusetts, 1633-1850"
    13. Abbrev: NEHGR
      Title:
      The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

      New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Boston, MA: New England Historical and Genealogical Society)

      The NEHGR or "Register" is the oldest and best known genealogical publication in North America. It focuses primarily on the genealogy of New England and the northeastern United States.

      New England Historic Genealogical Society
      101 Newbury Street
      Boston, MA 02116
      U. S. A.

      http://www.newenglandancestors.org

      Telephone: +1 (617) 536-5740 and +1 (888) 296-3447
      Fax: +1 (617) 536-7307

      membership@nehgs.org
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Page: Vol. 115, p. 60 "York Vital Records"
    14. Abbrev: NEHGR
      Title:
      The New England Historical and Genealogical Register

      New England Historical and Genealogical Register (Boston, MA: New England Historical and Genealogical Society)

      The NEHGR or "Register" is the oldest and best known genealogical publication in North America. It focuses primarily on the genealogy of New England and the northeastern United States.

      New England Historic Genealogical Society
      101 Newbury Street
      Boston, MA 02116
      U. S. A.

      http://www.newenglandancestors.org

      Telephone: +1 (617) 536-5740 and +1 (888) 296-3447
      Fax: +1 (617) 536-7307

      membership@nehgs.org
      Repository:
        Name: New England Historic Genealogical Society
        Boston, MA 02116
        U. S. A.

      Page: Vol. 44, p. 261 "The Banks Family of Maine" by Charles E. Banks
  • We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

    Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help
    We want to hear from you! Take our WorldConnect survey

    RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.