French, Scottish, Irish, German and English families of James and Deborah McDonald

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  • ID: I7748
  • Name: John Joseph Duggan 1
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 16 MAY 1868 in Fenelon Falls, Ontario, Canada 1
  • Death: 01 DEC 1952 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada 1
  • Note:
    From the book "Naming Edmonton: from Ada to Zoie", by the Edmonton Historical Board (Heritage Sites Committee):

    Two-time mayor John Joseph Duggan (1868-1952) was born in Ontario and came to Strathcona in 1891. He went on to run a succesful lumber yard. In 1899, the year that Strathcona was incorporated as a town, Duggan was elected as an alderman. He served as mayor in 1902 and 1903 and again from 1908 to 1910. A neighborhood in Edmonton is named after John Duggan on land once owned by him.

    From two seperate historical articles on John Duggan's residence at 10515 Saskatchewan Drive, by Lawrence Herzog:

    First article:

    In the early days of the 20th century, Saskatchewan Drive was an exclusive address, and it was where Strathcona’s elite preferred to locate their homes. John Joseph Duggan was one of those, and he completed his home at 10515 Saskatchewan Drive in 1907. Duggan’s two-storey residence commanded an exceptional view of the North Saskatchewan River valley and the growing heart of Edmonton, and was a fine representation of upper middle class architecture of the day. Neighbours included John Gainer, proprietor of Gainer Meats and the Gainer Block; J. Douglas of Douglas Brothers and the Douglas Block; and R.R. Buchanan, manager of the Bank of Commerce. John Duggan was born in Ontario in 1868, and was barely 23 years old when he set off west, in search of his fortune. He worked first at a British Columbia sawmill, and then arrived in the fledgling settlement of South Edmonton on one of the first trains on the Calgary & Edmonton Railway in 1891. Family wealth helped the young man establish himself in his new home. Duggan’s influential uncle, Cornelius J. Duggan, founded the first lumber yard in South Edmonton, and hired his nephew as agent and manager of the operation. The timing couldn’t have been better. Rapid development in South Edmonton and the surrounding area helped the lumber operation to flourish. Before long, Duggan established the town’s first rail yard, and expanded into farming, ranching, agricultural equipment, and real estate. In 1894, Duggan built a store at 10345 Whyte Avenue, first occupied by the Cowles Pioneer Drug Store. Many prospectors on their way to the Klondike Gold Rush were outfitted by store proprietor Arthur Davies. His economic accomplishments enhanced his social prestige and helped pave the way into politics. When South Edmonton was incorporated as a town in 1899 and renamed Strathcona, Duggan served on the first town council. In 1902 and 1903, he was elected mayor, and then was acclaimed mayor three times between 1908 in 1910. Duggan and his wife, Margaret Belle MacDonald, helped to form St. Anthony’s Roman Catholic Parish and provided lay leadership for the congregation. As an Irish Catholic in a predominantly Protestant community, Duggan faced some particular challenges, and the respect he commanded from his enterprise helped him overcome any intolerance he may have encountered. For his stately Saskatchewan Drive residence, Duggan chose a Queen Anne styled design with robust red brick construction. Its substantial scale, eclectic style is evident in the wooden front porch with two Doric columns that support a verandah roof and balcony, and quoins and keystones in the two round attic storey windows. A tall, hipped roof with two projecting gables completes the front facade. Interesting architectural details include an oculus window surrounded by circular brick courses divided by four equidistant sandstone blocks in the front gable extension. The architectural report completed by Alberta Culture’s Historic Resources Management Branch says the residence embodies the kind of architecture favored by Strathcona’s upper-middle-class residents during the period. “The building's excellent location, substantial scale, robust massing, and eclectic architectural detailing served the dual purpose of projecting J. J. Duggan's social prominence and refined aesthetic sensibilities and providing a comfortable, well-appointed living space for his family,” the report says. J.J. Duggan lived in the residence until 1931. During World War II it was converted to a duplex, and was restored to its original condition in 1978 by the Alberta Association of Architects. The J.J. Duggan residence was designated a Provincial Historic Resource on August 31, 1982. Outside original or restored elements include red-brick walls, voussoirs, corbelled chimneys, double hung windows with storm sashes and wood frames and multi-pane transoms. Inside, the house retains its original hardwood floors, baseboards, trims, mouldings, wainscoting, columns and capitals, doors, hardware, fireplace with rounded masonry construction and decoration, and oak staircase. John Joseph Duggan died in 1952. The south Edmonton neighbourhood of Duggan, built on land he once owned, was named in his honour, along with the bridge over Fort Hill Road at Saskatchewan Drive.

    Second article:

    Even in 1907, Saskatchewan Drive was an exclusive address, and it was where Strathcona’s elite chose to locate their homes. John Joseph Duggan was one of those. Duggan was joined by such neighbours as John Gainer, proprietor of Gainer Meats and the Gainer Block; J. Douglas of Douglas Brothers and the Douglas Block; and R.R. Buchanan, manager of the Bank of Commerce. John Duggan arrived in Strathcona on one of the first trains in 1891, and quickly set to work building his fortune. He managed the town’s first lumber yard, established its first rail yard, speculated in real estate and ran several firms. The house he built in 1907 cost $8,000, which was a substantial amount of money at the time. He chose a Queen Anne styled design, and its restrained classical detailing is evident in the wooden front porch with Doric columns that support a verandah roof and balcony, and quoins and keystones in the two round attic storey windows. A tall, hipped roof with two projecting gables completes the front facade. Duggan was elected as mayor of Strathcona in 1902 and 1903, and from 1908 to 1910. He lived in the Saskatchewan Drive residence until 1931. During World War II it was converted to a duplex, and was restored to its original condition in 1978 by the Alberta Association of Architects. In 1982, the J.J. Duggan Residence was designated a Provincial Historic Resource.

    From the Book "Alberta its Past and Present":

    JOHN JOSEPH DUGGAN.

    On the second train which entered Strathcona John Joseph Duggan was a passenger. He found here a straggling frontier village and the young man himself had but little of this world's goods. Today he occupies a beautiful home on Saskatchewan avenue, overlooking the river and commanding a fine view of the parliament building in Edmonton, this residence being a visible evidence of the prosperity that has come to him with the passing years, through the exercise of his efforts and business
    ability, making him one of the foremost representatives for agricultural and business life in this section. Other lines of industry have claimed his attention from time to time but his interest has always centered in the farm.

    John Joseph Duggan was born in Victoria district, Ontario, in 1868, and at the usual age became a public school pupil, thus continuing his education to the age of eighteen. When a young man of twenty-three he sought the opportunities of the growing west and from Calgary traveled north over the new railroad, arriving in South Edmonton, now Strathcona, in 1891. He made his initial business venture here as a lumber dealer, establishing a yard which he conducted with profit for seven years and then sold. In the meantime he had opened an agricultural implement house and carried on both lines of business for a time, continuing to deal in farm implements for twelve years. This naturally brought him into close contact with the residents of the rural districts and throughout his life he has been interested in agriculture and an advocate of progressive and scientific farming. For many years he has been widely known as a dealer in live stock and is still active in that branch of the business. His judgment is almost infallible as to the value of stock and he has always believed in improving these and adding to the value of animals through their productive work. He has acquired land holdings, having now three hundred and twenty acres of valuable farm property near Edmonton and another place of a thousand acres situated elsewhere, on which he engages in farming and stock raising. His entire record as a farmer has been marked by progress and by successful achievement. It has long been his ambition to own a model farm and he has worked constantly in that direction, while his fine properties with their many excellent improvements in the way of buildings, their highly cultivated fields and splendid farm animals, seem to indicate that he is fast reaching his goal. He has done much to stimulate an interest in progressive agriculture in this region, as his influence has been widely felt. He also owns considerable real estate in Strathcona, including improved property on several of the leading thoroughfares of the city, and is likewise the owner of the Duggan block on Whyte avenue. Mr. Duggan married Miss Belle McDonald of Glengarry district, Ontario, and they have two sons: Cornelius James and John Edward. The family has long been popular in the social circles of the city, and in connection with public activities Mr. Duggan is also well known. His loyalty to the general welfare brought to him the office of city councilman in 1899, so that he served as a member of the first city council for two years. In 1902 and 1903 he was elected to the office of mayor, and was made mayor by acclamation in 1908, 1909 and 1910. No higher testimonial of the efficiency of his service nor of the confidence reposed in him by the public could be given than this. He set himself resolutely to work to solve municipal problems and bring about improvement and progress in every line of city activity. He was the chief executive of Strathcona at the time the high level bridge across the Saskatchewan was built by the Canadian Pacific with the assistance of the Dominion government, the province of Alberta and the cities of Edmonton and Strathcona, at a cost of a million and a half dollars, this enterprise being one of the monumental features of the two cities. It was also while Mr. Duggan occupied the mayoralty chair that the high bridge across Mill creek was built, at a cost of forty thousand dollars, and during his terms of office the first street paving was instituted, while as mayor he saw the erection of all the administration buildings of the city. No one has been more thoroughly devoted to the welfare and upbuilding of Strathcona than J. J. Duggan, and his labors have at all times been far-reaching and resultant. His ideals are high but his plans are practical and he never stops short of the successful accomplishment of his pui-poses. He has labored just as earnestly and just as effectively to promote the public welfare as he has to advance his individual business interests, and his name is therefore in separably interwoven with the history of Strathcona and this part of the province.

    Family as enumerated in the 1901 Canadian census:

    John J Duggan/ Male/ Married/ 32/ 16 May/ 1868/ Ontario/ Head/ Irish/ Canadian/ Roman Catholic/ Machine Agt/ The Territories/ Alberta/ 202/ Strathcona (East/est)/ O4-1
    Margaret B Duggan/ Female/ Married/ 29/ 11 Oct/ 1871/ Ontario/ Wife/ Scotch (Scotish)/ Canadian/ Roman Catholic/ The Territories/ Alberta/ 202/ Strathcona (East/est)/ O4-1
    Cornelisu G Duggan/ Male/ Single/ 5/ 4 Nov/ 1895/ Alberta/ Son/ John J./ Margaret B./ Irish/ Canadian/ Roman Catholic/ The Territories/ Alberta/ 202/ Strathcona (East/est)/ O4-1
    Dennis Tunney/ Male/ Single/ 25/ 21 Jan/ 1876/ Ontario/ Boarder/ Irish/ Canadian/ Roman Catholic/ Book Keeper/ The Territories/ Alberta/ 202/ Strathcona (East/est)/ O4-1
    Edgerton McMillan/ Male/ Single/ 29/ 27 Nov/ 1871/ Ontario/ Boarder/ Scotch (Scotish)/ Canadian/ Roman Catholic/ Miner/ The Territories/ Alberta/ 202/ Strathcona (East/est)/ O4-1
    Maud Jackel/ Female/ Single/ 18/ 1882/ Austria/ Dom Ser (Domestic)/ Russian/ Austria (Austrian)/ Roman Catholic/ Dom Ser/ The Territories/ Alberta/ 202/ Strathcona (East/est)/ O4-1

    Family as enumerated in the 1906 Canadian census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta:

    33/ 76/ John J/ Duggan/ Head/ Male/ Married/ 37/ abt 1869/ Ontario
    34/ 76/ Margaret/ Duggan/ Wife/ Female/ Married/ 35/ abt 1871/ Ontario
    35/ 76/ Comelius/ Duggan/ Son/ Male/ Single/ 10/ abt 1896/ Alberta
    36/ 76/ Lizzie/ Caller/ Servant/ Female/ Single/ 42/ abt 1864/ Ontario
    37/ 76/ Sarah McDonald/ Sister-in-law/ Female/ Single/ 20/ abt 1886/ Ontario

    Family as enumerated in the 1911 Canadian census (Alberta > Strathcona > Sub-District 49 - Strathcona, part > Page 4):

    116/ Duggan/ John J/ 135 Saskatchewan Ave/ Male/ Head/ Married/ March 1868/ 43/ Ontario/ Irish/ Canadian/ R. Catholic/ Farmer
    116/ Diggan/ Margaret/ Female/ Wife/ Married/ October 1869/ 41/ Ontario/ Irish/ R. Catholic
    116/ Diggan/ Jack E/ Male/ Son/ Single/ April 1909/ 2/ Alberta/ R. Catholic

    Family as enumerated in the 1916 Canadian census of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta:

    11/ 375/ Duggan/ John/ 10515, Sack, Grime, Edmonton/ Self/ Male/ Married/ 47/ 1869/ Ontario/ Irish
    12/ 375/ Duggan/ Maggie/ 10515, Sack, Grime, Edmonton/ Wife/ Female/ Married/ 44/ 1872/ Ontario/ Scottish (Scotish)/ Scottish (Scotish)
    13/ 375/ Duggan/ Neil/ 10515, Sack, Grime, Edmonton/ Son/ Male/ Single/ 20/ 1896/ Alberta/ Irish
    14/ 375/ Duggan/ John/ 10515, Sack, Grime, Edmonton/ Son/ Male/ Single/ 6/ 1910/ Alberta/ Irish
    15/ 375/ Hocolah/ Sebina/ 10515, Sack, Grime, Edmonton/ Female/ Single/ 17/ 1899/ Austria/ 1914/ Austrian
    16/ 375/ McDonald/ Catherine/ 10515, Sack, Grime, Edmonton/ Mother-in-law/ Female/ Widowed/ 73/ 1843/ Ontario/ Scottish (Scotish)




    Father: John Duggan
    Mother: Jane Power

    Marriage 1 Margaret Belle McDonald b: 11 OCT 1870 in Lot 33 (34?), 9th Concession, Lancaster Twp., Glengarry Co., Ontario, Canada
    • Married: 05 FEB 1894 in St. Albert, Edmonton West, Alberta, Canada 1
    Children
    1. Has No Children Corneilus James II (Neil) Duggan b: 13 NOV 1895 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    2. Has No Children John Edward Duggan b: 28 APR 1909 in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

    Sources:
    1. Author: Duncan Darby MacDonald
      Title: Scotland's Migration to North America, Early Settlers to Upper Canada (Eastern Ontario) Stormont & Glengarry, a collection of genealogical charts
      Publication: Name: Part IV, 3rd Edition, Forth Printing- March 1998;
      Repository:
        Name: Personal library

      Note:
      Source Medium: Book
      Source Quality: Fair to Good

      Page: Pg. 714
      Text: Chart 325 (based on the research of Kathleen L. Duggan).
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