Northrups\Northorps\Gallops & Families

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  • ID: I00731
  • Name: Joseph Northrup 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • Sex: M
  • ALIA: Joseph * /Northrop/
  • Birth: 1623 in Wilkenfield, Kent Co., Yorkshire, , England 1 16 14 15
  • Death: 11 SEP 1669 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut 1
  • Death: in Possibly died at sea
  • Death: 11 SEP 1669 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut 1 14 15
  • Religion: 9 JAN 1641/42 United with The First Church in Milford CT 1 14 15
  • Emigration: 26 JUL 1637 Possibly from Bradford, Yorkshire Co. England; Landed Boston aboard ships "Hector and Martin"; as one of the " Eaton and Davenport's Company, of good character and fortune." 1 14 15
  • Residence: APR 1638 Settled in New Haven, Connecticut 1 14 15
  • Residence: Milford, Fairfield Co., Connecticut
  • Residence: 30 NOV 1639 Moved to Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut; not being in the Church following, his name appears immediately after the free planters. 1 14 15
  • Will: 1 SEP 1669 Will mentions children: Joseph, Samuel, Jeremiah, and John. Also mentions, "my mother, " possibly meaning his wife's mother. 1 14 15
  • Burial: 12 SEP 1669 Milford Cemetery, Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut at the corner of Cherry and Gulf Streets.
  • Burial: Joseph's headstone is unreadable. A later (1912) marker at Milford Cemetery lists Joseph, Mary (wife), William (son), and others on Stone A12 14 15
  • Burial: 1999 Joseph's headstone is unreadable. A later (1912) marker at Milford Cemetery lists Joseph, Mary (wife), William (son), and others
  • Event: Award/Distinction 30 NOV 1639 First settler in Milford, Connecticut 14 15
  • Event: Relationships Two citations exist for Joseph's father: 1) Joseph Northrup (b. abt 1594) of Kent, County Yorkshire, England and 2) William Northrop (b. Abt. 1592) of West Riding (very near Bradford), County Yorkshire, England who had a son, Joseph Northrop, baptized 1617 17 18 19 14 15
  • Immigration: 26 JUL 1637 Hectar & Martha Ship
  • Note:
    The record of Joseph's ancestry is unclear at this time (1999). Two citations exist for Joseph's parents: 1) Joseph Northrup (b. abt 1594) of Kent, County Yorkshire, England who married Katherine Birdsey and had a son Joseph Northrup and 2) William Northrop (b. Abt. 1592) of West Riding (very near Bradford), County Yorkshire, England who had a son, Joseph Northrop, that was baptized in 1617.

    INTRODUCTION
    The Northrup - Northrop Genealogy
    A. Judd Northrup, LL.D.
    The Grafton Press, 1908

    It was at the height of the tyrannous reign of Charles the First, and the persecutions of Laud, the prelate of the English Church, who sought to exterminate Puritanism at the dissolution of the Parliament of 1629, that multitudes of Protestant non-conformists emigrated to America, seeking refuge in a country where they might have freedom of conscience and worship. The great emigration began in 1630, and continued until about 1640. Among these seekers for religious freedom were Eaton and Davenport's company, "of good characters and fortunes."

    JOSEPH NORTHRUP, it is said on good authority, was a member of that company. They came from England in the ship "Hector and Martha," landing at Boston, July 26, 1637. The emigrants of that period were, in great part, men of the professional and middle classes, some of them of large landed estate. The bulk, however, were God-fearing farmers from Lincolnshire and Eastern counties. Eaton and Davenport's company were mostly from Yorkshire, Hertfordshire and Kent. It cannot now be determined from which county Joseph came perhaps from Yorkshire; and if of Sir Richard Saltonstall's company, as it sometimes has been asserted, this is highly probable.

    Sir Richard Saltonstall's company had spent some time at Wethersfield, Conn., having come there from Watertown, Mass., but later came to New Haven. The Eaton and Davenport company, meanwhile, had sailed down the coast from Boston, in search of a good harbor, until they came to New Haven, where they found the object of their search, and remained at New Haven about a year.
    In 1639, members from both companies form the settlement of Milford, Conn. The Hertfordshire and Yorkshire emigrants seem to have tended to Milford while others went to Guilford. Rev. Peter Prudden, of the Saltonstall company, whose wife was from Egton, Yorkshire, went to Milford. He was much beloved, and many Yorkshire men followed him.

    On Nov. 29, 1639, the little company who had come to Milford from New Haven signed a document which laid the foundation for their government of the "plantation." It read: "Those persons whose names are hereunto written are allowed to be Free Planters, having, for the present, the liberty to act in the choice of public officers, for the carrying on of public affairs in this plantation." Church membership was a condition of admission as a "Free Planter." Forty-four persons signed as such. Joseph Northrup, who was one of the company, was not then a church member, but with nine others was permitted to sign under the names of the full-fledged Free Planters. At a General Court (town meeting), held Nov. 24, 1640, the place was named "Milford." On Jan. 9, 1642, Joseph joined the First Church of Milford (organized at New Haven, Aug. 22, 1639, just before they came to Milford), and thereby became of right a member of that privileged class. He was married to Frances Norton about 1647. He died Sept. 11, 1669, thirty years after the settlement of Milford.

    The "Second Presbyterian Society" was formed in 1741-42, and was begun by members seceding from the First Church. They announced themselves to be Presbyterians according to the faith and practice of the Church of Scotland, and agreed on Nov. 30, 1741, to set up a separate society, in case the heads of thirty families would unite for that purpose. Accordingly, on the first Sunday in December, 1741, a public meeting was held for them at the house of George Clark, Jr. On the last Tuesday in January, 1742, they qualified themselves before the County Court, according to the "English Act of Toleration," by taking the oath and subscribing to the declaration required by said Act, for worshiping God in a way separate from that; by law established in the Colony. Among the signers was Josiah Northrup, son of Zophar, the fifth son of Joseph, the immigrant.

    The Governor and company granted a Patent to Milford, dated May 22, 1713. The names of the Northrup's, attached to the Patent (the original of which is in the handwriting of Jonathan Law, Esq., afterward Governor of Connecticut) in the order in which they signed, are as follows: John, son of Jeremiah; Zophar and Jeremiah, sons of Joseph; Jeremiah, Jr.; Joseph, James and Moses, sons of Joseph, Jr.; Amos and Joel, sons of Samuel; Daniel and William, sons of the first Joseph.

    The Colonists of Milford lived at a period when there was danger from hostile Indians. Their settlement was made shortly after the Pequot War. Although they purchased their lands of the tribes in possession, and sought their friendship, yet they soon saw indications of hostility, and as a protection built a palisade of logs enclosing a mile square, within which they had their dwellings.

    The Indians became hostile in 1645-6, and guards were kept day and night. They went to church, carrying their rifles with them. The Indians were again troublesome in 1653. In 1700 there was much danger. It was a time of general alarm throughout the country for four or five years. The colonists of New Haven and Milford had all along purchased from the Indians the lands they settled upon, and in every way treated the Indians kindly and fairly, but the hostility of these sons of the forest was awakened by their fears of the growing numbers and power of the whites, and the dawning consciousness that sooner or later they would inevitably be driven from their ancient homes. If they could have written history, it would go far to justify their hostility.

    The name, Northrup-Northrop, -Some effort has been made to find the name in England, to determine its origin and proper spelling. Seven different forms have been found. Maude, daughter of Simon Northrope, married in County York, in the reign of Henry VII (1485-1509). Elizabeth Northrope married April 21, 1669. William Northrope is mentioned in will, Dec. 20, 1485; Henry Northrope, 1489-90, in Beverly. Wills in York Registry give names of Robert Northrope, 1591; Richard Northrope, 1611; George Northrope, of Heaton. 1618; William Northrope, 1616; John Northrope, 1592; William del Northrope, 1288-1294, on jury. All these names terminate in -rope. No other forms appear in the York County records as far as examined. These forms also appear elsewhere in England: Northorp, Northorpe, Northoppe, Northrope, Northrop, Northropp, del Northrope.

    I once found the name of Northrup, a "recusant" the only instance I have found of that name in England.

    A German family of St. Louis give their name Northrupp as their father, who came from Germany, spelled it. This is a possible hint of the origin of the name "Northrupp."

    In the published official list of soldiers of, the Revolution in. Massachusetts, the following forms of the name appear: -Northrup, Northrupt, Northrop, Northorp, Northroup, Nortrop, Northrip.

    In the Yorkshire Parish Register, Vol. IX, appear the following: 1604-, Northrop, Northrope; 1617, Northrope; 1649, Northrope; 1664, Northroppe.

    The Hertfordshire records contain the names Northrope, Northroppe, Northropp (1599). Northorp appears in the Parish Registry of Horbury.

    These facts show clearly that at least in York County and Hertfordshire the name, for a long period, has been Northrop, or Northrope. The other forms, -thorp, -op, -oppe, are evidently modifications of Northrop.

    The name is a compound of North and the Saxon word thorp (appearing in such names as Althorp) and the Middle English thrope, meaning town or village. John of North-Thorpe became "John Northorpe." This was naturally changed, for case of speaking it, to Northrope, or Northrop.

    Winthrop and Lathrop are examples of. the same change. The change to Northrup may have been a change to correspond to a manner of speaking the word "Northrop," or, in some parts of England the name in that form may have been common, or the may have been arbitrarily made. I think however, the original name in England-certainly in Yorkshire and Hertfordshire was Northorpe, and then "Northrop." Whether this form ever prevailed in some parts of England, or was an arbitrary change made by Joseph, I have no opinion.
    Joseph Northrup, the immigrant, called himself Northrup. In the early records and deeds of Milford he spelled his name Northrup. Land grants to him were to Joseph Northrup (Town Clerk's letter). In Barber's history of Connecticut he spells the name of Joseph Northrup. His son Joseph's tombstone bears the same name, and his sons, Moses, James and Joseph, who went to Ridgefield, and most of their descendants, spelled their names Northrup. This Moses made a will (which I have seen), in which the scribe who drew it gave his name as "Northrop," but Moses signed it "Northrup." I have no means of determining how the other sons of the first Joseph spelled their names (except that Samuel's family is said to have spelled the name -rup), nor how or how soon the form Northrop came into common use. A great effort has been made in the preparation of this Genealogy to make the form of the name correspond to the custom of the various families, but doubtless many mistakes have been made. The greater number of families spell the name Northrop. The Northrup's are next in number.

    Northup is the name of the immigrant, Stephen Northup, who accompanied Roger Williams to Rhode Island in 1645, and his descendants do not appear in this book, although some have changed the name to Northrup and others to Northrop. They are not of the family of Joseph, the immigrant. I cannot account for the origin of the name in that form, nor have I any information from what part of England Stephen Northup came.

    Northrip, or Nortrip (as I have seen it), is the name of but one family group, who settled in Ulster County, N. Y. I think it is a local modification of Northrop. They are not included in this book, as there is no way of showing that they are descendants of Joseph.

    Perhaps this long dissertation upon the -name is unimportant, but the subject has been much discussed, and some persons will be interested in the facts stated.

    A word more, which perhaps should have been earlier said. I began my work almost wholly in the dark, and certainly with no comprehension of its difficulties and magnitude. I undertook to get the families, not only of Northrup, but also of Rhode Island Northup's and their descendants. I accumulated a large amount of material, but difficulties arose which seemed insurmountable, and I abandoned the effort of getting the Northup family history. I hope some one of that branch will seriously undertake the task, and my material will be at his service.

    Many members of the Northrup-Northrop family, of whatever name, served in all the important wars of the country, and especially in the Colonial wars, the Revolution, and the Civil War. An enumeration has been made, in an Appendix, of those in three States, who served in the Revolution, but not in other States or in other wars.

    These early settlers began their life in America prompted highest motives, were "'of good character," honest, industrious, patriotic and God-fearing. It will not be surprising to find multitudes of the same sort in the records of this book. They have swelled the ranks of good citizens; many, with honor, served their generation in the humbler walks of life; others have been prominent in various professions, in legislative halls, as honored heads of educational institutions, the courts of justice, on the bench, some reaching the highest places of ecclesiastical dignity, and many giving their patriotic service to their country on the battlefield, but the fundamental qualities of their sturdy and upright forefathers have been, I believe, their dominant characteristics in all these spheres of their activities and influence.

    It would afford me great satisfaction, as I say the last word here, by special mention to extend my thanks and gratitude to the many of these family names, and others, who have aided me in this work now brought to a close, but space forbids. I may mention, without being invidious, or seeming to forget others, a very few. The work of Merwin J. Northrop, of Waterbury, Conn., who labored for several years in the preparation of a Genealogy of the family, which was almost ready for publication when lie died, about a year ago. He was a young man who almost seemed to have a passion for research, and gathered and arranged much valuable material. His father, Homer F. Northrop, kindly turned it all over to me, and I have used such material as I did not already possess. Nathan G. Pond, of Ridgefield, Conn., in his lifetime, and Mrs. Pond, since his death, have rendered me great and valuable service. Mr. and Mrs. Hosea B. Northrop, of Newtown, Conn., contributed a vast amount of family history of Connecticut families. It is impracticable to mention the hundreds out of the nearly thousand correspondents who aided me materially. The kindness of most of them in answering my sometimes persistent inquiries has won my warmest gratitude, and many of them seem like long-time and much-prized friends. To those named, and to these unnamed but not forgotten ones, my hearty thanks and kindest remembrances. I linger, looking back in memory, and think of this goodly company, and wish them, here and hereafter, "the best things.

    I JOSEPH NORTHRUP, immigrant from England, and perhaps- from Yorkshire. He was one of "Eaton and Davenport's Company, of good character and fortune," who came from England in 1637 in the ships Hector and Martin. They landed in Boston July 26, 1637, and settled at New Haven in Apr., 1638. They were mostly from Yorkshire, Hertfordshire, and Kent. Members of this company, and of Sir Richard Saltonstall's Company, removed to and settled Milford, Conn., and the "free planters of the town" were enrolled Nov. 30, 1639; but Joseph, not then being in church following, his name (with others) appears in the list immediately after the free planters. The surname Northrup was spelled as here given in the earliest records and inscriptions on tombstones - rup - sometimes rupp, and occasionally roop, and more often rop, although this last termination was not common at an early period. Joseph, his s. Joseph and his s., James, Joseph, and Moses, and most, of their descendants, spelled the name Northrup. Northrop, however, was the common form in England. (See Introduction, on the subject of Name.)

    January 9, 1640-, Joseph united with The First Church in Milford. He married Mary, daughter of Francis Norton, who came to Milford from Wethersfield with the Rev. Peter Prudden and his party. Joseph died Sept. 11, 1669. His will was dated Sept. 1, 1669. It mentions of his children only Joseph, Samuel, Jeremiah, and John. Codicil to his will says, "My mother shall have a living in my house as long as she lives" perhaps meaning his wife's mother, Mrs. Norton. His wife survived him, and made her Will Jan. 24, 1683; mentions Joseph, Samuel, Jeremiah (omits John, who probably was dead), Zophar, Daniel, William, and Mary - the latter being in their minority - also her mother Norton. Inventory of her estate dated Feb. 28, 1683. Children b. in Milford.



    [Northrup Family Tree1.FTW]

    [Brøderbund WFT Vol. 3, Ed. 1, Tree #4417, Date of Import: December 2, 1998]
    #1 JOSEPH NORTHRUP, immigrant from England, and perhaps from Yorkshire. He was one of "Eaton and Davenport's Company, of good Character and fortune," who came from England in 1637 in the ships Hector and Martin. They Landed in Boston July 26, 1637 and settled at New Haven in April., 1638. They were mostly from Yorkshire, Hertfordshire, and Kent. Members of this Company, and of Sir Richard Saltonstall's Company, Removed to and settled Milford, Conn., and the "free planters of the town" where enrolled Nov. 30, 1639; but Joseph, not then being in church folling, his name (with others) appears in the list immediately after the free planters. The surname Northrup was spelled as here given in the earliest records and inscriptions on tombstones----rup---sometimes rupp, and occasionally roop and more often rop, although this last termination was not common at an early period. Joseph 1, his son Joseph 2 and his son, James, Joseph, and Moses< and most of there descendants, spelled the name Northrup. Northrop, however, was the common form in England. (See Introduction on the Subject of Name.)
    January 9, 1642, Joseph united with The First Church in Milford. He married Mary, daughter of Francis Norton who came to Milford from Wethersfield with the Rev. Peter Prudden and his party. Joseph died Sept. 11, 1669. His will was dated Sept. 1, 1669. It mentions of his children only Joseph, Samuel,Jeremiah, and John. Codicil to his will says, "My mother shell have a living in my house as long as she lives"---perhaps meaning his wife's mother, Mrs. Norton. His wife survived him, and made her will Jan. 24, 1683; mention Joseph, Samuel< Jeremiah (omits John, who probably was dead), Zophar, Daniel, William, and Mary--- the latter two being in their minority---also her mother Norton, Inventory of her estate dated Feb. 28, 1683.
    AJN


    #1 - "Christian" Joseph Northrup of Yorkshire, England, came to Milford, Connecticut in the early 1600's, and seems to have been the originator of the Kings County Loyalist family of Northrup. By the time the revolution started in 1776, the descendants of Christian Joseph Northrup had spread over what is now the state of Connecticut and beyond. Benajah Northrup, who was the fifth generation, was loyal to the King of England and during the war served in 'the "Guides and Pioneers" as a volunteer. The story handed down in the Northrup family is that there were three branches of this family who came as Loyalists. One, to what is now Nova Scotia, one to Upper Canada, settling at or near Brockville, and Benajah Northrup and his family came to what is now New Brunswick in 1783. They went up the St. John River above Sheffield or Lower Maugerville but the high freshet of the spring of 1784 flooded them out.
    He then moved to Kingston on Portage Cove also referred to as Belleisle Creek but now called Kingston Creek and was granted lot #6. This lot must have been abandoned by some earlier settler, as #6 was in Hauser's first survey in 1783 and at that time allotted to somebody else. A girl and a boy were lost by this family during this period of upheaval. The girl, Mary, died most likely when they were at Long Island refugee camps. The boy, William, 1st, who was born on the St. John River in 1783, died at Kingston in 1784 when just over a year old.
    There is no record to substantiate the Northrup story that one branch went to Nova Scotia and one to Upper Canada but as some of the Kingston "Northrup's" did in later years go to Yarmouth, N. S., it may have been from these travelers that they think that another Loyalist branch did exist in Nova Scotia.
    (From "Genealogy of Northrups, Barters and Benson's" Page 4, by Ernest G. C. Graham)


    The Northrup-Northrop Genealogy
    By A. Judd Northrup
    It was at the height of the tyrannous reign of Charles the First, and the persecutions of Laud, the prelate of the English Church, who sought to exterminate Puritanism at the dissolution of the Parliament of 1629, that multitudes of Protestant non-conformists emigrated to America, seeking refuge in a country where they might have freedom of conscience and worship. The great migration began in 1630, and continued until about 1640.

    Among these seekers for religious freedom were Eaton and Davenport's company, "of good characters and fortunes." JOSEPH NORTHRUP, it is said on good authority, was a member of that company. They came from England in the ship "Hector and Martha," landing at Boston, July 26, 1637. The emigrants of that period were, in great part, men of the professional and middle classes, some of them of large landed estate. The bulk, however, were God-fearing farmers from Lincolnshire and Eastern counties. Eaton and Davenport's company were mostly from Yorkshire, Hertfordshire and Kent. It cannot now be determined from which county Joseph came--perhaps from Yorkshire; and if of Sir Richard Saltonstall's company, as it sometimes has been asserted, this is highly probable.

    Sir Richard Saltonstall's company had spent time at Wethersfield, Conn., having come there from Watertown, Mass., but later came to New Haven. The Eaton and Davenport company, meanwhile, had sailed down the coast from Boston, in search of a good harbor, until they came to New Haven, where they found the object of their search, and remained at New Haven about a year.

    In 1639, members from both companies formed the settlement of Milford, Conn. The Hertfordshire and Yorkshire emigrants seem to have tended to Milford, while others went to Guilford. Rev. Peter Prudden, of the Saltonstall company, whose wife was from Egton, Yorkshire, went to Milford. He was much beloved, and many Yorkshiremen followed him.

    On Nov. 29, 1639, the little company who had come to Milford from New Haven signed a document which laid the foundation for their government of the "plantation." It read: "Those persons whose names are hereunto written are allowed to be Free Planters, having, for the present, the liberty to act in the choice of public officers, for the carrying on the public affairs in this plantation." Church membership was a condition of admission as a "Free Planter." Forty-four persons signed as such. Joseph Northrup, who was one of the company, was not then a church member, but with nine others was permitted to sign under the names of the full-fledged Free Planters. At a General Court (town meeting), held Nov. 24, 1640, the place was named "Milford." On Jan. 9, 1642, Joseph joined the First Church of Milford (organized at New Haven, Aug. 22, 1639, just before they came to Milford), and thereby became of right a member of that privileged class. He was married to Frances Norton about 1647. He died Sept. 11, 1669, thirty years after the settlement of Milford.

    The "Second Presbyterian Society" was formed in 1741-42, and was begun by members seceding from the First Church. They announced themselves to be Presbyterians according to the faith and practice of the Church of Scotland, and agreed on Nov. 30, 1741, to set up a separate society, in case the heads of thirty families would unite for that purpose. Accordingly, on the first Sunday in December, 1741, a public meeting was held for them at the house of George Clark, Jr. On the last Tuesday in January, 1742, they qualified themselves before the County Court, according to the "English Act of Toleration," by taking the oath and subscribing to the declaration by said Act, for worshiping God in a way separate from that by law established in the Colony. Among the signers was Josiah Northrup, son of Zophar, the fifth son of Joseph, the immigrant.

    The Governor and company granted a Patent to Milford, dated May 22, 1713. The names of the Northrups, attached to the Patent (the original of which is in the handwriting of Jonathan Law, Esq., afterward Governor of Connecticut) in the order in which they signed, are as follows: John, son of Jeremiah; Zophar and Jeremiah, sons of Joseph; Jeremiah, Jr.; Joseph, James and Moses, sons of Joseph, Jr.; Amos and Joel, sons of Samuel; Daniel and William, sons of the first Joseph.

    The Colonists of Milford lived at a period when there was danger from hostile Indians. Their settlement was made shortly after the Pequot War. Although they purchased their lands of the tribes in possession, and sought their friendship, yet they soon saw indications of hostility, and as a protection built a palisade of logs enclosing a mile square, within which they had their dwellings. The Indians became hostile in 1645-6, and guards were kept day and night. They went to church, carrying their rifles with them. The Indians were again troublesome in 1653. In 1700 there was much danger. It was a time of general alarm throughout the country for four or five years. The colonists of New Haven and Milford had all along purchased from the Indians the lands they settled upon, and in every way treated the Indians kindly and fairly, but the hostility of these sons of the forest was awakened by their fears of the growing numbers and power of the whites, and the dawning consciousness that sooner or later they would inevitably be driven from their ancient homes. If they could have written history, it would go far to justify their hostility.

    The name Norhtrup--Northrop.--Some effort has been made to find the name in England, to determine its origin and proper spelling. Seven different forms have been found. Maude, daughter of Simon Northrope, married in County York, in the reign of Henry VII (1485-1509). Elizabeth Northrope married April 21, 1669. William Northrope, 1489-90, in Beverly. Wills in York Registry gives names of Robert Northrope, 1591; Richard Northrope, 1611; George Northrope, of Heaton, 1618; William Northrope, 1616; John Northrope, 1592; William del Northrope, 1288-1294, on jury. All these names terminate in -rope. No other forms appear in the York County records as far as examined. These forms also appear elsewhere in England: Northorp, Northorpe, Northoppe, Northrope, Northrop, Northropp, del Northrope.

    I once found the name Northrup, a "recusant"--the only instance I have found of that name in England.

    A German family of St. Louis give their name Northrupp, as their father, who came from Germany, spelled it. This is a possible hint of the origin of the name "Northrup."

    In the published official list of soldiers of the Revolution in Massachusetts, the following forms of the name appear: Northrup, Northrupt, Northrop, Northorp, Northroup, Nortrop, Northrip.

    In the Yorkshire Parish Register, Vol. IX, appear the following: 1604, Northrop, Northrope; 1617, Northrope; 1649, Northrope; 1664, Northroppe.

    The Hertfordshire records contain the names Northrope, Northroppe, Northropp (1599). Northorp appears in the Parish Registry of Horbury.

    These facts show clearly that at least in York County and Hertfordshire the name, for a long period, has been Northrop, or Northrope. The other forms, -thorp, -op, -oppe, are evidently modifications of Northrop.

    The name is a compound of [the word] North and the Saxon word thorp (appearing in such names as Althorp) and the Middle English thrope, meaning town or village. John of North-Thorpe became "John Northorpe." This was naturally changed, for ease of speaking it, to Northrope, or Northrop.

    Winthrop and Lathrop are examples of the same change. The change to Northrup may have been a change to correspond to a manner of speaking the word "Northrop," or, in some parts of England the name in that form may have been common, or the change may have been arbitrarily made. I think, however, the original name in England--certainly in Yorkshire and Hertfordshire--was Northorpe, and then "Northrop." Whether this form ever prevailed in some parts of England, or was an arbitrary change made by Joseph, I have no opinion.

    Joseph Northrup, the immigrant, called himself Northrup. In the early records and deeds of Milford he spelled his name Northrup. Land grants to him were to Joseph Northrup (Town Clerk's letter). In Barber's history of Connecticut he spells the name of Joseph Northrup. His son Joseph's tombstone bears the same name, and his sons, Moses, James and Joseph, who went to Ridgefield, and most of their descendants, spelled their names Northrup. This Moses made a will (which I have seen), in which the scribe who drew it gave his name as "Northrop," but Moses signed it "Northrup." I have no means of determining hoe the other sons of the first Joseph spelled their names (except that Samuel's family is said to have spelled the name -rup), nor how or how soon the form Northrop came into common use. A great effort has been made in the preparation of this Genealogy to make the form of the name correspond to the custom of the various families, but doubtless many mistakes have been made. The greater number of families spell the name Northrop. The Northrups are next in number.

    Northup is the name of the immigrant, Stephen Northup, who accompanied Roger Williams to Rhode Island in 1645, and his descendants do not appear in this book, although some have changed the name to Northrup and others to Northrop. They are not of the family of Joseph, the immigrant. I cannot account for the origin of the name in that form, nor have I any information from what part of England Stephen Northup came.

    Northrip, or Nortrip (as I have seen it), is the name of but one family group, who settled in Ulster County, N. Y. I think it is a local modification of Northrop. They are not included in this book, as there is no way of showing that they are descendants of Joseph.

    Perhaps this long dissertation upon the name is unimportant, but the subject has been much discussed, and some persons will be interested in the facts stated.

    Joseph may have been the son of William & Mary (Fearnley) Northrop and not the son of Joseph & Katherine (Birdsey) Northrup.




    Father: Joseph Northrup b: 1603 in Derby, County Derbyshire, England
    Mother: Katherine Birdsey

    Marriage 1 Mary Norton b: 1627 in Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut
    • Married: 9 JAN 1641/42 in The First Church, Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut by Rev. Peter Prudden 1
    • Married: APR 1646 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut by Rev. Peter Prudden
    Children
    1. Has No Children Miriam Northrup b: 28 MAR 1647 in New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
    2. Has Children Joseph Northrup , 2Nd b: 17 JUL 1649 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    3. Has Children Samuel Northrup , Sr. b: 26 OCT 1651 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut c: 26 OCT 1651 in First Church, Milford, New Haven Co., CT
    4. Has No Children John Northrup b: 7 SEP 1656 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    5. Has No Children Phoebe Northrup b: 1656
    6. Has Children Zophar Northrup b: 21 JUN 1661 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    7. Has Children Daniel Northrup b: 7 AUG 1664 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    8. Has Children William Northrup b: 2 JUN 1666 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    9. Has Children Mary Northrup b: 6 JAN 1669/70 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut

    Marriage 2 Mary Norton b: 1627 in Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut
    • Married: 9 JAN 1641/42 in The First Church, Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut by Rev. Peter Prudden 1 14 15
    Children
    1. Has Children Joseph Northrup b: 17 JUL 1649 in Milford, New Haven, Connecticut
    2. Has Children Samuel Northrup b: 26 OCT 1651 in Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut
    3. Has Children Jeremiah Northrup b: 14 JAN 1652/53 in Milford, New Haven, CT

    Marriage 3 Mary Norton b: 1627 in Wethersfield, Hartford Co., Connecticut
    • Married: 9 JAN 1641/42 in The First Church, Milford, New Haven Co., Connecticut by Rev. Peter Prudden 1 14 15

    Sources:
    1. Title: NorthrupM.FTW
      Author: Clyde Northrup (cnorth@concentric.net)
      Publication: Compliled and Edited Family Data
      Note: Good
      Repository:
      Note: (cnorth@concentric.net)
      Media: Electronic
      Text: Date of Import: Nov 4, 1998
    2. Title: Norton Family of Guilford, Connecticut 1856 - Family Tree Maker Library
      Author: Albert B. Norton
      Publication: W. H. Moore, Printer, Washington DC (1856)
      Note: Descendents and Ancestors of Charles Norton of Guilford, Connecticut as Determined by Albert B. Norton and Rev. John Norton.
      Note: Good
      Repository:
      Note: Family Tree Maker Library
      Media: Book
      Page: 24
    3. Title: First Settlers of N.E., Savage, Vol. 3 DICT. - Family Tree Maker Library
      Author: James Savage
      Publication: Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862
      Note: Author: FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND EDITOR OF WINTHROP'S HISTORY OF NEW ENGLAND.
      WITH TWO SUPPLEMENTS IN FOUR VOLUMES. VOL. III. Baltimore
      Repository:
      Note: Family Tree Maker Library
      Media: Book
      Page: 177
    4. Title: GENDEX (http://www.gendex.com)
      Repository:
      Note: Internet
      Media: Electronic
      Page: #BI, XF
      Text: http://www.my-ged/db/page/rowden/10255
      Data reported on 2 Dec. 1998
      http://www.my-ged.com/db/page/rowden/10248
      revised 23 Dec. 1998
    5. Title: First Settlers of N.E., Savage, Vol. 4 DICT. - Family Tree Maker Library
      Author: James Savage
      Publication: Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862
      Note: Author: FORMER PRESIDENT OF THE MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL SOCIETY AND EDITOR OF WINTHROP'S HISTORY OF NEW ENGLAND.
      WITH TWO SUPPLEMENTS IN FOUR VOLUMES. VOL. III. Baltimore
      Note: Good
      Repository:
      Note: Originally Published Boston, 1860-1862
      Media: Book
      Page: 422
    6. Title: Newtown's History and Historian, Ezra Levan Johnson (Family Tree Maker Library)
      Author: Jane Eliza Johnson
      Publication: Newtown, Connecticut
      Repository:
      Note: Family Tree Maker Library <http://www.familytreemaker.com/_glc_/1514/index.html>
      Media: Book
      Page: 394; #1
    7. Title: Northrup-Northrop Genealogy, The
      Author: Ansel Judd Northrup, LL.D. of Syracuse, New York
      Publication: The Grafton Press, Genealogical Publishers, 70 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York, 1908
      Note: A. Judd Northrup was also the author of "Camps and Tramps in the Adirondacks," "Sconset Cottage Life," "Slavery in New York," etc.
      Note: Good, but typographical and family relationship errors have been found
      Repository:
      Note: Copy of the Orig.: Higginson Book Co., Salem MA; Tel.#: (978) 745-7170; email: higginsn@cove.com
      Media: Book
      Page: 2-3, #1
    8. Title: CD World Family Tree, Volume # 3, Pre - 1600 to Present
      Author: Family Tree Maker
      Note: Fair
      Repository:
      Note: Family Tree Maker Library
      Media: Family Archive CD
    9. Title: Families of Early Milford, CT
      Author: Susan Woodruff Abbott
      Publication: 1979
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    10. Title: Barbour Collection - Milford Records
    11. Title: World Family Tree --
      Author: Brøderbund Software, Inc.
      Publication: Release date: February 9, 1996
      Note: Customer pedigree.
      Repository:
      Note: Vol. 3, Ed. 1
      Media: Family Archive CD
      Page: Tree #4417
      Text: Date of Import: Dec 2, 1998
    12. Title: Genealogy of Northrup's, Barters and Bensons of Springfield, N.B. by Ernest G. C. Graham
      Author: Ernest G. C. Graham
      Publication: Private Publication
      Note: Carries the Northrup Family down to Jesse Northrup with textual references to Fred Northrup in about proper time frame of 1920.
      Note: good quality
      Repository:
      Note: Original given to M. Northrup in 1998
      Media: Book
      Page: 4
      Text: See Notes on the Beginnings of the family
    13. Title: The Northrup-Northrup Genalogy By Ansel Judd Northrup, LL.D.
      Author: A. Judd Northrup, LL.D.
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: page 1
    14. Title: Jn.ftw
      Repository:
      Media: Other
      Text: Date of Import: Sep 26, 2000
    15. Title: Northrup Family Tree1.FTW
      Repository:
      Media: Other
      Text: Date of Import: Mar 14, 2005
    16. Title: CD #15 Family Pedigrees: Everton Publishers 1500-1900
      Author: Everton Publishers, 1994
      Publication: V015
      Note: Good
      Repository:
      Note: Family Tree Maker Library
      Media: Family Archive CD
    17. Title: International Genealogical Index (IGI) - FamilySearch Web Site
      Author: Genealogical Contributors to the Church of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) Database
      Publication: Family Search Ancestral File <http://www.familysearch.com/>
      Note: Fair
      Repository:
      Note: Church of the Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.
      Media: Church Record
    18. Title: Internet:
      Repository:
      Media: Other
      Page: Joseph S. Northrop <jsnorth@ctinet.com>; Data reported on 18 September, 1999
    19. Title: International Genealogical Index (IGI)
      Author: Genealogical Contributors to the Church of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) Database
      Publication: Family Search Ancestral File <http://www.familysearch.com/>
      Note: Fair
      Repository:
      Note: Church of the Latter Day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A.
      Media: Church Record
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