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  • ID: P227
  • Death: Disappeared in a river with alligators on his Nicaraguan property. His body never found... 07-06-1869 in Hacienda San Antonio, Corinto, Dept. Chinandega, Nicaragua
  • Name: Agoston Haraszthy
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 08-30-1812 in Pest, Hungary
  • Note:
    Information from "A History of the Town of Roxbury from 1877," by Imma Mae Griffin, 1975: "In 1840, Augustine Haraszthy, commonly known as Count Haraszthy, with his cousin Charles Hallasz [Károly "Charles" Fischer], the latter of whom has ever since resided and now resides at what is now [since 1854] called Sauk City [or Sauk Prairie]; Hungarians [the first Hungarian to settle in the U.S. permanently] by birth, immigrated to and located at the place last named. Haraszthy appears to have been a man of great energy and of considerable means, and very enthusiastic about the future of this country. He invested at once in lands in the neighborhood, and set about improvement. So far as can now be ascertained, in the fall of 1840, he erected the first building in this town, not for a residence, but as a sort of hunting lodge. This was a log building, and was set upon a point of the bluff above and near the Wisconsin river, and nearly opposite the lumber office of Mr. Hallasz, as it now stands in Sauk City. During the year 1841, Haraszthy established a ferry across the Wisconsin river near or a little below where the Sauk City bridge now stands, and the house now owned and occupied by P. J. Schleck, Esq., as a store, saloon, and post office, was built by Mr. Haraszthy in that year, and used as a ferry house. Robert Richards and Jacob Fraelich operated the ferry, and resided in this house. This is supposed to have been the first dwelling erected in town, and they the first residents. At this point two or three Indian trails met, and for several years, this was the usual crossing place. From this date there was little improvement in the town for four years.

    Information from Wikipedia: "Agoston Haraszthy (August 30, 1812, Pest, Hungary - July 6, 1869, Corinto, Nicaragua) was a Hungarian-American traveler, writer, town-builder, and pioneer winemaker in Wisconsin and California, often referred to as the "Father of California Viticulture," or the "Father of Modern Winemaking in California." One of the first men to plant vineyards in Wisconsin, he was the founder of the Buena Vista vineyards (now Buena Vista Carneros) in Sonoma, California, and an early and important writer on California wine and viticulture. Haraszthy was born on August 30, 1812, in Pest, Hungary (since 1873 a part of Budapest), the only child of Károly (Charles) Haraszthy and his wife, Anna Maria Fischer. The oft-repeated claim that Haraszthy was born in Futak (Futog), Hungary (now part of Serbia), has been disproved: the records of his birth and baptism are preserved today in the Roman Catholic Church of Terézváros in Budapest, where Haraszthys biographer, Brian McGinty, examined them in 1995. Both Agoston and Charles Haraszthy owned estates in a part of southern Hungary called the Bácska, now a part of Serbia. Agostons father-in-law was Ferenc Dedinszky, the superintendent of a large estate at Futak on the Danube River where, among other things, vines were cultivated and wine was produced. Both of the Haraszthys were in the wine business in and around Futak. On January 6, 1833, Agoston Haraszthy married Eleonora Dedinszky in Bács County, Hungary.The Dedinszkys were of Polish descent, though they had lived in Hungary for centuries and long been accepted into the Hungarian nobility. Agoston and Eleonora Haraszthy were the parents of six children, four boys and two girls. Traveling with a cousin named Károly Fischer, Haraszthy left Hungary for America in March, 1840. Moving through Austria, Germany, and England, Haraszthy and his cousin crossed the Atlantic to New York, then proceeded by way of the Hudson River, the Erie Canal, and the Great Lakes to Wisconsin, where they eventually settled. In later years, Haraszthy claimed that he was forced to leave Hungary because his liberal political activities had drawn the wrath of the Habsburgs , who ruled Hungary with a tyrannical hand. In the best-selling book he wrote about his American adventures, however, he made it clear that he came to America in search of economic opportunity. The commercial life of Hungary was stultified by a rigid imperial government, which granted monopolies to a privileged few and denied economic opportunity to others. In Haraszthys own words, he came to America "for one reason only - namely, to see this blessed country for myself." Haraszthy was a gifted writer in his native Hungarian, in German (which he spoke from birth), and later in English. When he returned to Hungary in 1842, he made arrangements to write a Hungarian-language book about the United States. He traveled widely through the United States to gather material for the book, which praised American life and enterprise. The two-volume book was published at Pest in 1844 under the title of Utazas Éjszakamerikában (Travels in North America). A second edition was published in 1850. This was the second book about the United States to be published in Hungarian. In Wisconsin, Haraszthy and his cousin attempted to settle on some land at Lake Koshkonong. This effort was unsuccessful, however, so they went on to the Sauk Prairie, on the Wisconsin River west of Madison. There Haraszthy purchased a large tract of property facing the river and laid out a town. First called Széptaj (Hungarian for Beautiful Place), later Haraszthy (or Haraszthyville or Haraszthopolis), the town was renamed Westfield and finally Sauk City after Haraszthy left for California in 1849. Haraszthy is still remembered in Sauk City as the towns founder. In 1842, Haraszthy returned to Hungary to bring his mother and father, wife and children, to Wisconsin as permanent American residents. The Haraszthys became United States citizens and never again returned to Hungary. In Wisconsin, Haraszthy formed a partnership with an Englishman named Robert Bryant and threw himself into a myriad of ambitious projects. Besides the town that he laid out, he built mills, raised corn and other grains, and kept sheep, pigs, and horses. He opened a brickyard, kept a store, operated a ferry across the Wisconsin River, and obtained the approval of the Wisconsin legislature to build a bridge across the Wisconsin River. Many of the oldest houses still standing in Sauk City were built with bricks from Haraszthys brickyard, although the bridge was not built, for before he could get the project under way he left Wisconsin for California. In Wisconsin, Haraszthy was a legendary hunter, noted among the residents for once having killed a wolf with his bare hands. Haraszthy donated land on which the first Roman Catholic church and school in Sauk City were built. He owned and operated a steamboat, which carried passengers and freight on the Wisconsin and Mississippi Rivers. He also planted grapes and dug wine cellars into hillside slopes above the town. The cellars and slopes are today home to the Wollersheim Winery, one of Wisconsins best-known wine producers. Like many others, Haraszthy was excited by news of the discovery of gold in California in 1848, and by the end of that year he completed plans to leave Wisconsin. Early in 1849, he was elected captain of a train of wagons destined for California via the Santa Fe Trail. Although most California-bound travelers were lured westward by dreams of gold, Haraszthy said that he was going to California "to settle, not for the gold," and that he intended to plant a vineyard near San Diego. Traveling with his entire family, he left Wisconsin in March, 1849 and arrived in San Diego the following December. In San Diego, as in Wisconsin, Haraszthy plunged into a frenzy of activity. He formed a partnership with Juan Bandini, a prominent Spanish-Californian, and launched a host of business and agricultural projects. He planted fruit orchards, operated a livery stable and stagecoach line, opened a butcher shop, and organized a syndicate to subdivide a large section of the San Diego Bay shore into streets, parks, and building lots. The land lay between Old Town and New San Diego and was called Middle San Diego, or Middletown. It was informally known in San Diego as "Haraszthyville." While in San Diego, Haraszthy imported grape vines by mail. Some came from the eastern United States, others from Europe. He also planted a vineyard on a tract of land near the San Diego River. On April 1, 1850, in the first election held under the new American administration of California, Haraszthy was elected sheriff of San Diego County. He also served as city marshal. In his capacity as a private contractor, he built a jail for the city of San Diego, which was completed in 1851. Haraszthy was elected as California State Assemblyman from San Diego in September, 1851. He served from January 5 to May 4, 1852, advancing proposals to relieve flooding on the San Diego River, build a state hospital in San Diego, ease tax burdens on Southern California landowners, replace the debt-ridden San Diego city council with a board of trustees, and provide relief for the indigent in San Diego. He also led an unsuccessful movement to divide California into two states. While attending the legislature, Haraszthy began to buy real estate near Mission San Francisco de Asís (Mission Dolores) in San Francisco. His first purchase there was made on March 25, 1852. He tried to raise grapes in San Francisco but found the climate too foggy. He acquired a large tract of land near Crystal Springs on the San Francisco Peninsula (now part of San Mateo County) and planted it to vineyards, but eventually gave up the effort to make wine there, again finding the climate too foggy to ripen the grapes. In both San Francisco and Crystal Springs, Haraszthy continued to import a wide variety of European grape vines and experimented with their planting and cultivation. In San Francisco, Haraszthy became friendly with a group of Hungarian metallurgists. He formed a partnership under the name of Haraszthy and Uznay and built a large private refinery facility, called the Eureka Gold and Silver Refinery. When a branch of the United States Mint opened in San Francisco in April 1854, Haraszthy became the first U.S. assayer. In August 1855, he became melter and refiner at the Mint. A grand jury investigation of alleged defalcations of gold from the Mint led in September, 1857, to a federal indictment charging Haraszthy with the embezzlement of $151,550 in gold. A long investigation led to the dismissal of the criminal charges. A civil trial then followed, which fully exonerated Haraszthy in February 1861. While the mint investigation was pending, Haraszthy moved to Sonoma, about fifty miles north of San Francisco. In 1856, he bought a small vineyard northeast of the town and renamed it Buena Vista. He moved his vines there from Crystal Springs and began to expand the vineyards. In 1857, he began to bore tunnels into the sides of a nearby mountain and build stone cellars at their entrance. He eventually had two large stone winery buildings, equipped with underground tunnels and the latest wine-making equipment in California. Haraszthys cellars at Buena Vista were the first stone wineries in the state. He added acreage to his original purchase, eventually holding more than 5,000 acres (20 kmř) of valley and hillside. He was a proponent of hillside plantings, arguing that vines should be permitted to grow without irrigation. He divided some of his acreage into smaller plots, inducing prominent Californians to come to Sonoma, where he planted vineyards for them. He was a vocal advocate of Chinese immigration, arguing that Chinese should be permitted to come to California and provide much-needed labor. He built a Pompeiian-style villa in the middle of the Buena Vista vineyards, in which he lived with his family. In 1858, Haraszthy wrote a 19-page "Report on Grapes and Wine of California," which was published by the California State Agricultural Society. With practical advice for planting vines and making wines, it encouraged the planting of grapes throughout the state. In later years, Haraszthys "Report" was recognized as the first treatise on winemaking written and published in California, and praised as the "first American explication of traditional European winemaking practices." Haraszthy had by this time achieved recognition as Californias leading winemaker. He contributed articles to newspapers and made speeches to gatherings of agriculturalists. He entered his wines in the competition of the California State Fair and received the highest awards. On April 23, 1862, he was elected president of the California State Agricultural Society. In 1863, Haraszthy incorporated the Buena Vista Vinicultural Society, the first large corporation in California (perhaps in the United States) organized for the express purpose of engaging in agriculture. With the support of prominent investors, he greatly expanded his vineyards in Sonoma, making wine which was sold as far away as New York. In 1864, an article in Harpers Magazine proclaimed that Buena Vista was the largest establishment of the kind in the world. In 1861, Haraszthy was appointed by California Governor John G. Downey as a commissioner to report to the Legislature on the "ways and means best adapted to promote the improvement and growth of the grape-vine in California." He decided to make a trip to Europe to investigate the best European vine-planting and winemaking practices and to gather cuttings of European vines. He traveled through France, Germany, Switzerland, and Spain before returning to California in December 1861 with more than 100,000 cuttings of more than 350 different varieties of vines. He offered to sell the vines to the state, propagate them in his Sonoma nursery, test them to determine which were best suited to the California soil and climate, and distribute them to would-be winemakers throughout California. The Legislature refused the offer, leaving Haraszthy to distribute the vines at his own expense. It was a financial setback, for Haraszthy had expended large sums of money in gathering the vines and bringing them back to California. In Sonoma, Haraszthy became friendly with Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, the former comandante general of Mexican California, founder of Sonoma, and a neighboring landowner. Vallejo himself was a well-respected winemaker. On June 1, 1863, the Haraszthy and Vallejo families were united in a double wedding, with two of the Haraszthy sons marrying two of the Vallejo daughters. In that wedding, Natalia Vallejo became Mrs. Attila Haraszthy, and Jovita Vallejo became Mrs. Arpad Haraszthy. Haraszthys management of the Buena Vista Vinicultural Society was both visionary and reckless. He borrowed large sums of money to expand the vineyards and cellars. He employed layering as a planting technique. This resulted in quicker propagation of vines but also exposed the plants to soil diseases. By the middle of the 1860's, the vines at Buena Vista were growing brown and weak. Haraszthys critics believed this was due to his layering. In fact, it was the result of the first infestation of the phylloxera ever known in California. Almost unknown before it made its appearance in Sonoma, the phylloxera spread in subsequent years throughout the California vineyards and even crossed the Atlantic to France, where it caused devastation. With production lagging, profits from Buena Vista wine were inadequate to pay the Societys debt. Shareholders forced Haraszthy out of the Vinicultural Society in 1867 and replaced him with another manager, who tore out all of his layered vines. Haraszthy left Buena Vista for another vineyard in Sonoma owned by his wife. While living there, he filed bankruptcy. In 1868, Haraszthy left California for Nicaragua. He formed a partnership with a German-born physician and surgeon named Theodore Wassmer and began to develop a large sugar plantation near the seaside port of Corinto. He planned to make rum from the sugar and sell it in American markets. On July 6, 1869, he disappeared in a river on his Nicaraguan property. Whether he fell into the river and was thereafter washed out to sea, or was dragged under the water by alligators which infested the area, was never finally established. His body was never found. The Haraszthys were a noble Hungarian family who traced their roots to Ung county in northeastern Hungary, now a part of Slovakia. Agoston Haraszthy belonged to the Mokcsai branch of the Haraszthy family, signifying that at one time or another his ancestors owned estates at places called Mokcsa and Haraszth. In Hungary, he was formally known as Mokcsai Haraszthy lgoston. (In Hungary, family names are written first and given names last. See Hungarian name.) The name has sometimes been written as Agoston Haraszthy de Mokcsa, but this is an erroneous attempt to render the Hungarian surname of Mokcsai in the French style. It was never used by Haraszthy himself and is totally foreign to Hungarian names, either in their original form or as used in English-speaking countries. In the United States, Haraszthy was known as Agoston Haraszthy, or simply A. Haraszthy. The correct pronunciation of his name in Hungarian is Aa-go-shtone Hoar-o-stee. In the United States, the name is anglicized as August-un Harris-tee. Haraszthys descendants living in California today spell their surname in Hungarian fashion as Haraszthy and pronounce it as Harris-tee. When Haraszthy lived in Wisconsin in the 1840's, he was referred to as "Count" Haraszthy by the local settlers, mostly German-speaking immigrants. He was not a count, however, and he was never addressed by that title in Hungary, California, or Nicaragua. In California, he was addressed as "Colonel" Haraszthy, an honorary designation commonly given to distinguished "gentlemen" and vaguely derived from his military service in Hungary. Despite his lack of a formal title, Haraszthys noble ancestry is uncontroversial. The oft-repeated claim that Haraszthy brought the first Zinfandel vines to California is a subject of controversy. In the 1870's and 1880's, Haraszthys son Arpad Haraszthy stated that his father brought the first Zinfandels to California in the early 1850's, possibly as early as 1852. Arpad was then a well-known champagne producer in San Francisco and President of the California State Board of Viticultural Commissioners, and his statement was widely accepted. [1] A century later, however, California wine historian Charles L. Sullivan began to challenge Arpads statement. [2] In 2003, Sullivan published a book in which he showed that other men brought the Zinfandel to the East Coast of the United States as early as the 1820's and to California at unspecified dates in the 1850's. Although Sullivan praised Agoston Haraszthy as a "truly important figure in the history of the American West" and "an important force in the history of California winegrowing," he argues that there is no credible evidence that Haraszthy brought the Zinfandel to California and that Arpad Haraszthys claim about it was a "myth." In his biography of Haraszthy, however, McGinty presents evidence that Haraszthy may well have obtained Zinfandel vines as early as 1852 with the help of Lázár Mészáros, former Hungarian Minister of War and an avid horticulturalist who was then operating a nursery in New Jersey. This evidence would tend to corroborate Arpad Haraszthys recollections. Sullivan does not discuss it in his book, thus leaving the issue in controversy. In March 2007, Haraszthy was inducted into the Vintners Hall of Fame by the Culinary Institute of America. Seventy wine journalists cast ballots, honoring Haraszthy for his contributions to the early development of the wine industry in California. The award was accepted in Haraszthy's behalf by his great-great grandson, Vallejo Haraszthy."
    Per New York, Passenger and Immigration Lists, 1820-1850: Name: August Haraszthy Arrival Date: 28 Sep 1842 Age: 30 Gender: M (Male) Port of Arrival: New York Port of Departure: Liverpool Place of Origin: Hungary Ship: PHILADELPHIA Comments: Count Family Identification: 30103162 Microfilm Serial Number: M237Microfilm Roll Number: 50
    Per 1850 U.S. Federal census Agoston Haraszthy is living in San Diego, CA, born abt 1811 Hungary Married Sheriff [was elected first sheriff in San Diego after CA became a state in March, 1850-1851], spouse name Elenor
    Per
    California State Roster, 1911 Government and Military records aboutAgostan HaraszthySurname:HaraszthyGiven:AgostanPosition:Member of the AssemblyPage #:259Location:San DiegoPer 1860 U.S. Federal census Agoston Haraszthy is living in Sonoma, Sonoma, California, born abt 1812 Hungary Married Wine Maker, spouse name Eleanora
    Per Sonoma State University Library Archives, "Agoston Haraszthy (1812-1869) Father of Modern Viticulture in California," Capsule Biography, http://library.sonoma.edu/regional/notables/haraszthy.html "On 30 August 1812. Agoston Haraszthy was born in Pest, Hungary, the only child of Karoly Haraszthy and Anna Maria Fischer. Contrary to legend, Agoston was not a Count, although he was from a noble family. Karoly was extremely well educated and cultured. He was literate in 16 languages. Although he worked as a chemist, apothecary, and metallurgist, Karoly spent most of life in the wine business. On 06 January 1833, Agoston married Elenora Dedinsky [she may have been of Polish origin]. They became the parents of six children: Geza, Attila, Arpad, Ida, Bela, and Otelia. Agoston held the position of vice-notarius of Baks County and managed his agricultural property. In 1840 the spirited Agoston left Hungary for the U.S., becoming the first Hungarian to settle here permanently. Haraszthy's first stop was Sauk Prairie, Wisconsin, where he founded the oldest incorporated village in the state, Haraszthy Town. He operated the first steamboat to engage in scheduled traffic on the upper Mississippi and pursued many other development plans for the area. In 1841 Haraszthy returned to Hungary after traveling through the Great Plains, New Orleans, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, and Washington D.C. (where he met with President Tyler). The following year, he returned to Wisconsin with his parents, wife, and children. In 1849, asthmatic and in debt, Haraszthy's doctor advising him to move to Florida or California . This advice and California gold lures the family West by wagon train. In California, Agoston planted a vineyard, operated a livery stable, stage line, and butcher shop. He became the first town marshall, first county sheriff, and builder of the first city jail in San Diego. Haraszthy's attempt to collect county taxes at Agua Caliente ultimately resulted in a violent Indian uprising and martial law in San Diego. In 1851 Haraszth's wife and younger children sailed for the East Coast, while he left for Vallejo to serve in the State Assembly. He did not seek reelection and moved to San Francisco instead of returning to San Diego. Haraszthy continued his agricultural pursuits, including vineyards, on 200 acres of land near San Francisco and later 640 acres at Crystal Springs. When the new U.S. Mint was established in San Francisco, President Pierce appointed Haraszthy as assayer. Several years later concerns about losses of gold led to Haraszthy's resignation and a grand jury investigation. Charged with embezzling over $150,000, he was exonerated after a five day trial in 1861. In 1857 Haraszthy purchased land at Sonoma, named it Buena Vista, and put his son Attila in charge. Elenora and the children returned and Agoston soon planted 25 acres of grapes, more than doubling the total vines at Sonoma. Another 60 acres were planted the following year. He experimented with new techniques, such as using redwood for barrels, planting on hillsides, hiring Chinese workers, digging tunnels for storage, and planting vines closer together. In 1860 Agoston first noticed that some vines were weak and eventually died. He could not know then that this was the root louse, phylloxera, which was native to the U.S., striking less resistant European rootstock with a vengeance. In 1861 he was commissioned by the State Legislature and traveled to Europe to collect and purchase grapevine specimens of every variety. He visited France, Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and Spain, bringing back over 100,000 cuttings of 350 varieties. The legislature failed to reimburse Haraszthy, leaving him to care for, propagate, and sell them on his own. Even so, Haraszthy was elected as President of the California State Agricultural Society and his book, Grape Culture, Wines, and Wine-Making was well received. In 1863 sons Arpad and Attila were married in a double ceremony to Jovita and Natalia Vallejo, daughters of Mariano G. Vallejo. In 1864 Buena Vista was incorporated as the Buena Vista Viticultural Society in order to gain the support of new investors for capital improvements. In 1866 Haraszthy's innovative planting methods were blamed for damage actually caused by the root louse. As crops deteriorated and financial problems loomed, he either resigned or was dismissed as superintendent. New management promptly destroyed every other row of vines in order to return to the original eight foot spacing. In 1867 Agoston Haraszthy filed for bankruptcy and in the same year in the Gubernatorial election, Haraszthy championed the use of Chinese labor in California. He supported the proposed Fourteenth Amendment guaranteeing "equal protection under the law" and the Fifteenth Amendment extending the right of former slaves to vote. The political climate of Sonoma County was in overwhelming disagreement with Haraszthy. In 1868 Haraszthy traveled to Nicaragua with his son Geza. He was soon engaged in plans to develop a large sugar plantation. His wife Elenora and daughter Otelia joined them but, only two months after her arrival, Elenora died of yellow fever. Haraszthy returned home to settle his wife's estate and to make plans for obtaining machinery needed for his Nicaraguan enterprises. In 1869 Haraszthy returned to Nicaragua accompanied by his seventy-nine year old father, who did not adjust well to the climate. He soon left for San Francisco but died on the voyage home.. On the 06 July 1869 Agoston Haraszthy set out alone on a mule to discuss the construction progress of a new sawmill. He never returned home and no trace of him was ever found. It appeared that he had tried to cross a river along a fallen tree when a large limb broke. He lost his balance, fell into the water, and was either pulled under by an alligator or swept out to the shark infested ocean. Neither father nor son was aware of the other's death and both now rest in the sea. Phylloxera continued to ravage the vineyards of both California and Europe. By 1880, only a single vine remained in Attila Haraszthy's Sonoma vineyard. The State of California acquired the Buena Vista estate for unpaid taxes. In 1989 Agoston Haraszthy's home was rebuilt by new owners and is now the centerpiece of a 500 acre private park."
    Information from Wikipedia: "Sauk City is a village in Sauk County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 3,109 at the 2000 census. Founded by Agoston Haraszthy and his business partner Robert Bryant. Impressed by the beautiful scenery, Count Agoston Haraszthy first purchased a small plot along the Wisconsin river, later (with his partner Robert Bryant), bought 10,000 acres (40 kmř) for a town site and founded the town of Haraszthy. The village was later renamed to Sauk City. German immigrants founded the Sauk City Freethinker's Society (Freie Gemeinde) in 1852. This group, a liberal religious society, also celebrated German music, literature and culture. It met in a private home until 1884, when Park Hall was built as a meeting house. The building is now home to the Sauk County Free Congregation, a Unitarian Universalist fellowship. Sauk City is adjacent to Prairie du Sac, located directly to the north. Both communities are located on the west bank of the Wisconsin River. The two communities share a municipal boundary, as well as schools, a police department, and a hospital, but have separate fire departments, and libraries. Efforts have been made to join the two cities into a single entity, Sauk Prairie, but these have failed because of tax differences between the communities. Sauk City is on U.S. Highway 12, approximately 18 miles northwest of suburban Madison."
    From Wisconsin Local History & Biography Articles, the Sauk County News April, 1913, www.wisconsinhistory.org: "Count Augustine Haraszthy was known to some of our settlers and for that reason perhaps makes this item of interest. He was the germ of the German settlement at Sauk City, having come here in the fall of 1840, in company with his cousin, Chas. Hallasz. Their intentions when leaving their mother country, Hungary, were to settle in Florida, that state having just come into the union and was represented in Hungary as the Garden of Eden by the German travelers. On leaving Hamburg they purchased a copy of Maryatt's description of his trip from Green Bay up on the Fox River via Fort Winnebago and down the Wisconsin river t Praire du Chien, so detailed was this description as to determine them to alter their destination. Consequently they landed at New York city and sailed by the Hudson river and Erie canal to Buffalo and by steamboat to Milwaukee. They made their way from there to Janesville and Madison from where they came here about the middle of July, 1840. In the fall Mr. Haraszthy went to Milwaukee returning with an acquaintance, Robert Bryant, with whom he entered into partnership. They purchased a claim for $1,000 and the next year employed Chas. O. Baxter to lay out a town, and named it Haraszthy. The name was later changed to Westfield, and at a later date to its present name Sauk City. Augustine, his wife, children and father remained here until the spring of 1849, when they left for California by the overland route. Mr. Haraszthy's father was appointed assayer in the mint at San Francisco and his son appointed clerk. They soon amassed a fortune........"
    From The Capital Times, 31 March 1923, www.wisconsinhistory.org: "Roxbury Township founded by Hungarian Count in 1840. Roxbury, a little hamlet situated between Madison and Sauk City, had for first settlers, a German Catholic priest and his followers in 1845. The township, however, had been settled some years before by Augustin Haraszthy, a Hungarian count, who had fled from his native country for political reasons. Haraszthy erected a log cabin upon a high bluff overlooking the Wisconsin river, directly opposite the present town of Sauk City, in 1840. A year later, in company with a wealthy Englishman, Mr. Bryant, he purchased the land upon which Sauk City is now located, from Berry Haney, who had been operating a ferry over the river. Haney wishing to return to his family at Cross Plains, disposed of the ferry to Robert Richards and Jacob Fraelich. The latter then took possession of the cabin erected by Haraszthy and Richards and finished a home on lots purchased in "Superior city" which had been platted by George Floyd, an eastern speculator, in 1837. For several years after this there were no more settlers, although travelers between Madison and the river were continually passing back and forth. In 1845 Father Adelberg Inama, a German Catholic priest, came to this vicinity and soon drew a number of settlers of that faith around him. Among those who came early were Adolph Fasbinder, Carl Schugart, Mr. Weber, Anton Gauser, George Baltis, Nicholas Breckendorf, Michel Michels, Michael Loeser and Conrad Jordan. During the years 1845-46 Richard Taylor, George Richards, James Crowder, Burke Fairchild and T. M. Warren, natives of the eastern states, also arrived. Up to that time this township had been used but little for agricultural purposes, but now the influx of settlers made the raising of crops imperative. The settlers also demanded their own town government, for it was then attached to the present township of Dane, then known as Clarkson. On March 21, 1849, it was formed into a separate town under its present name and the first election held at the home of Zachariah Bowers in April. The following officers were elected: Burke Fairchild, chairman; Lorenzo Farr and L. D. Miller, supervisors; James Crowder, clerk; James Steel, treasurer, and L. A. Farr, assessor. The only settlement in the township at the present time is that of Roxbury, the outgrowth of Father Inama's labors. It consists of a number of dwelling houses, two stores, meat market, auto garage and a beautiful Catholic church built in Gothic style, with a Sister's home, parsonage and school."
    From The Baraboo News, Saturday, 11 April 1906: "Sixty years ago today there was an important election in Sauk county. After the county was formed the county seat was located at Prairie du Sac but with the growth of population the idea became prevalent that the county seat should be more central. It was urged by some who opposed a change that the Baraboo valley and the country to the north was one vast rocky wilderness wholy unit for civilization. At a mass meeting held in 1845 a committee was appointed consisting of Count Haraszthy, Edward Rendtorff, Levi Morre, Abraham Wood, Thomas Remington and W. H. Canfield to make an exploration of the interior of the county and determine whether or not the country was suitable for habitation. The count's trusty mare carried provisions for a week and three guns with a dog constituted the outfit. The first night was spent on Seeley creek and in the morning it was found the old mare had gone home to her colt. After some privations the party returned, the legislature granted a petition for a special election and it was voted April 7, 1846 to move the county seat. A board of twelve members was appointed to select a place and Baraboo was decided upon. The office was soon after moved from Prairie du Sac to the new location."
    Per San Francisco History "Events of 1857," sfgenealogy.com: "September 19 - The Grand Jury of the United States presented an indictment against AUGUSTIN HARAZTHY, for embezzling gold to the amount of $151,550, from the U.S. Branch Mint. The indictment set forth that the said melter and refiner did, while employed in the MInt, "unlawfully and feloniously embezzle a portion of the metals committed to his charge for the purpose of being coined, to wit: 8,092 ounces of gold bullion; and one gold bar, " the whole valued at the above amount. He was arrested the same evening by the U. S. Marshal, and admitted to bail, giving two sureties in $10,000 each, and himself the sum of $20,000."
    From the Daily Register, Portage, Wisconsin, 28 April 1903: "A MUCH WANTED PORTRAIT. Agoston Haraszthy was an Old Resident and After Many Years of Effort His Picture is secured for Historical Purposes--He supplied Fuel for Fort Winnebago--Sketch of His Life - After many years of effort, Mr. A. J. Turner has succeeded, through the efforts of Postmaster Porter during his recent visit to San Francisco, in procuring a photograph of Count Agostin Haraszthy, who came to Wisconsin at an early date. The distinguished Hungarian had a most eventful career in this as well as the old country and elsewhere. We would be glad to publish a more extended biography of the Count, but for the present content ourselves with this sketch of him which we find in the Wisconsin Historical Collections: Agosten Haraszthy was born in 1812 in the comitat [county] of Baeska, Hungary, this country having been prominent in Hungarian annals for upwards of 700 years. Educated in the law he was at the age of 18 a member of Emperor Ferdinand's bodyguard (of nobles), later being a chief executive officer of his (Haraszthy's) district , and then private secretary of the Hungarian viceroy. Upon the liberal movement of 1839-40 in which he was engaged he was compelled to fly to the United States. After extensive travels over our country he wrote a book (in Hungarian) intended to encourage his fellow-countrymen to emigrate to America. In 1840-41 he settled in Wisconsin where he had a large tract of land which he improved at much cost, making necessary roads and ferries. Gaining permission to return temporarily to Hungary to surrender certain state papers to that government he succeeded in saving $150,000 from his confiscated estates, together with a considerable amount of family plate and paintings. With this fortune he returned to Wisconsin (1842-43) and founded what is now Sauk City, where he planted the first hop yard in the state and encouraged others to do likewise; he was highly successful in the crop. He became the head of an emigration association which brought to Wisconsin large and successful colonies of English, Germans and Swiss. In 1848 he made considerable contributions of arms, supplies and money to his revolutionary compatriots in Hungary. The following year (1849) he removed to California and was elected sheriff of San Diego County. He was for many years a prominent citizen of that state and held various prominent public positions. He is called the father of viniculture in California and published much on that subject. In 1861 he was appointed by the governor as special commissioner to visit European vineyards and report thereon; the result of his report was the introduction of 400 distinct varieties of apples into the Golden State. In 1868 he went to Nicaragua, where at the head of a company of friends he obtained valuable privileges for the manufacture of wines and spirits, suger and lumber, acquiring 100,000 acres of the best land in Center America. It was upon his plantation, the Hacienda San Antonio near the port of Cornito, that he met his death (July 6, 1870). When Haraszthy returned to America in 1842-43 he was accompanied by his mother, who died at Grand Gulf, Miss., 1844-45, and his father, Charles, who at the age of 80 was buried at sea on his return to San Francisco from Cornito (July 22, 1870). Colonel Haraszthy's wife, (nee Elenora Dodinskz) died at Leon, Nicaragua July 15, 1869. His son, Col. Gaza Haraszthy, died on the family plantation in Nicaragua, December 17, 1878, aged 45; his sons, Atilla F. and Arpad, were born in Hungary and now (1898) live in California; another surviving son (Bela) was born in Sauk City, Wisconsin; of his two daughters, Ida was born in Peoria, IL and Otillie in Madison, WI. Count Agosten's portrait will be a valuable addition to the portrait gallery in the City Hall."
    From the Baraboo Daily News, November 12, 1919: "VISIT TO BATTLE FIELD OF WISCONSIN HEIGHTS. Little Journey To Scene Of Bitter Fight On July 21, 1832. Not Well Known In Immediate Neighborhood, by H. E. Cole: "Can you tell me where the battlefield of Wisconsin Heights is located?" we asked the man at the toll end of the bridge at Sauk City as we pushed down on the brake of the car. "The battlefield of Wisconsin Heights?" "Yes, sir," we replied as we slipped him a quarter for the privilege of crossing the structure. "Never heard of it," he answered as he passed us a red ticket or returning over the river. "I think Mr. Taylor about two miles away can tell you, though,", he added. Then the car rattled over the long and ancient structure, and the wheel turned the machine to the right into the road leading toward Mazomacie. After going almost a mile a stop was made and farmer hailed. "Please, sir, can you tell us where the battlefield known as Wisconsin Heights is located ?" is what fell into his ears. Although he lived in sight of the place sought, he had heard nothing of the battle nor of its location. He added, however, that if anyone in the neighborhood knew it was Mr. Taylor, who lived a little over a mile away. The car was headed into a drove of cattle coming down the road, three men following along behind. Here was an opportunity to kill the three birds again presented: "Can you tell us where the battlefield of Wisconsin Heights is located?" One of the three men said he did not know, another looked as blank as the flyleaf of a book, and the third suggested that in case the battlefield of Wisconsin Heights was in the neighborhood, Mr. Taylor could tell us. The car then ran one-half mile to the east and another one-half mile to the south, stopping in front of Mr. Taylor standing beside his home just as if he were waiting to welcome us. "Is this Mr. Taylor?" "Yes, sir." "Can you tell us where to find the battlefield of Wisconsin Heights?" "I certainly can," he replied in a tone of positiveness and pleasure. Over a fence we climbed, then another and still another, bringing us to a ravine not more than 50 rods from his home. Before us flowed a quiet, nameless brook through its serepentine course. To our left was a wooded elevation, the edge of the cliff being irregular in its outline. "There," said Mr. Taylor, "is where the battle of Wisconsin Heights was fought. The Indians were forced to retire toward the Wisconsin river, some of them following the course of the stream near the hills and other taking to the woods on the elevation." The battle was fought on July 21, 1832. Black Hawk, his warriors, squaws, old men and children crossed the Mississippi river into Illinois, terrorized several communities, and hurried to Lake Koshkonong. The chief expected the Winnebago to join him but in this he was disappointed as they remained neutral. Militia were soon on the trail of Black Hawk and he had to fly from Lake Koshkonong. With his warriors he took a nortthwesterly direction camping at Four lakes, now Madison. General Dodge at the head of the militia was in hot pursuit. This the Indians knew and breaking camp at break of day, they hurried toward the Wisconsin river hoping to cross the stream and reach what is now Sauk county before being overtaken by the whites. The race was an exciting one. The Indians rushed across the country throwing away mats, kettles and other property to give them increased freedom in their march. At intervals they made a feint at battle which proceedure would halt the pursuing soldiers and give the red men ahead time to proceed. After this had occured several times General Dodge decided to charge the next time the Indians stopped. Many of the horses ridden by the soldiers became exhausted and were abandoned, the men rushing forward on foot in order to be present when the decisive moment came. About 5 o'clock the Indians turned again and this resulted in the battle of Wisconsin Heights. The real commander of the Indians was said to be Napope, who rode a white pony. He took a position on the top of a mountain in the rear of his Indians, kept up a constant yell (giving orders) until the Indians begun to retreat, when he was heard no more. General Dodge led the whites, Col. Jones had a horse shot from under him, a soldier was killed, and several wounded. By this time General Henry gave the order to charge which the soldiers did with readiness. They chased the Indians up the rising piece of ground, a halt was made, and both whites and Indians shot at each other abreast. The aborigines could not stand against this and ran. Night came on and then morning broke the Indians had escaped into what is now Sauk county by crossing the Wisconsin river. The one soldier killed, John Short, was buried on a knoll, and day was spent in getting the wounded ready to be taken to the fort at Blue Mounds. Part of the Indians went down the Wisconsin river and were fired upon by other soldiers near the mouth of the river. Black Hawk continued to the mouth of the Bad Axe and was utterly routed in trying to get across the river." [I added this story because this area is approximately where Agoston Haraszthy lived - twc 2009]
  • OBJE:
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  • FORM: jpg
  • Title: Agoston Haraszthy
  • OBJE:
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  • Title: Agoston Haraszthy Mansion
  • OBJE:
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  • FORM: jpg
  • Title: Agoston Haraszthy
  • OBJE:
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  • Title: Agoston Haraszthy



    Father: Karoly "Charles" Haraszthy b: ABT 1790 in Futak, Pest, HUNGARY
    Mother: Anna Maria Fischer b: ABT 1791 in Futak, Pest,HUNGARY

    Marriage 1 Eleanora de Dedinszky b: ABT 1816 in Futtak, Bacska, Hungary
    • Married: 01-06-1833 in Bacska, Bacs Co., Hungary
    Children
    1. Has No Children Gaza Haraszthy b: 1834 in Pest, Hungary
    2. Has Children Attila Frederick Haraszthy b: 1835 in Pest, Hungary
    3. Has Children Arpad Haraszthy b: 06-28-1840 in Pest, Hungary
    4. Has No Children Ida Haraszthy b: ABT 1843 in Peoria, Peoria Co., IL
    5. Has No Children Otelia "Otillie" Haraszthy b: ABT 1844 in Madison, Sauk Co., WI
    6. Has No Children Bela A. Haraszthy b: ABT 1846 in Sauk City, Sauk Co., WI
    7. Has No Children Joanna Haraszthy b: ABT 1847 in Sauk City., Sauk Co., WI
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