Individual Page


Sources
1. Title:   Census
Page:   1930 Wenonah, Gloucester Co., NJ
2. Title:   Find A Grave
3. Title:   South Jersey Times

Notes
a. Note:   http://wenonahhistoricalsociety.org/William-E-Seiders-Jr has: Wall of Heroes: 1st Lt. William E. Seiders Jr. [portrait here] 1st Lt. William E. Seiders served with Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s Third Army, United States Army, during World War II. He was the son of William E. Seiders Sr. and Myra B. Seiders of 207 North Clinton Ave., Wenonah. Seiders was a graduate of Woodbury High School and Drexel Institute. He entered the Army in April, 1943, and, after training at Camp Walters and Camp Livingston, graduated from Officers Candidate School in April, 1944. Seiders was promoted to First Lieutenant Dec. 1, 1944 at Camp Luis Obispo, California. He was killed in action April 26, 1945. The Wall of Heroes honors the Gloucester County men and women who were killed in action or are missing in action while serving in the U.S. military protecting our freedoms and rights. The Gloucester County Freeholder Board unveiled The Wall of Heroes on Nov. 11, 2010 at the Gloucester County Justice Complex featuring the likenesses of 100 Heroes. There are at least 350 Gloucester County residents who never made it home, so there is more work to be done. The community‚Äôs assistance in identifying those residents who may be eligible to be placed on the wall is crucial. The Wall of Heroes consists of framed 5-by-8-inch translucent artistic renderings portraying reasonable likenesses of the persons whom the county is honoring. The wall represents all branches of the military and they are arranged by era. Because The Wall of Heroes features artistic renderings of those who made the ultimate sacrifice, photographs are of particular importance. If there is no photograph that can be found of the person to be honored, only the name and other key information of the military personnel will be framed on the wall. Information, applications and eligibility can be found at http://www.co.gloucester.nj.us/depts/v/vaffairs/heroapp/default.asp or by contacting the Gloucester County Office of Veterans Affairs at 856-401-7660. Bill Seiders was well remembered by his Drexel classmates and fraternity brothers. See "Fact and Fancy" column by his fraternity brother, John Weaver, which appeared in the "Drexel Triangle," May 29, 1945. http://wenonahhistoricalsociety.org/sites/default/files/Drexel-Triangle_1945-05-29-see-page-2-Bill-Seiders.pdf * * * http://oralhistory.rutgers.edu/interviewees/30-interview-html-text/547-hale-richard-m-part-1 has: The other fellow who was a good friend of mine, even a better friend earlier, Lieutenant Seiders, a good officer, he was killed, right on the banks of the Danube. As I say, the Germans were very good at ... using these natural barriers ... to defend themselves. They're sound soldiers. ...It was a tough, tough fight. My friend, ... Lieutenant [William E.] Seiders, was killed. ... He was the commander of the machine gun platoon right next to me, and then, the other machine gun platoon, Lieutenant Gustafson, he wasn't able to "take it." We got ... right up to the Danube River. We had captured towns and had the Krauts on the run, so-to-speak. ... It was difficult. Sometimes, they would stand, and they would use a natural fortress, or whatever it was, and we would have a job capturing it, and we'd probably taken more casualties than we wanted, things like that, but, we got to ... the Danube River, and this is where I'd said, "Men, once we capture this town," they could rest, we could recoup. We'd just lost our two platoon leaders, two heavy machine gun platoon leaders. ... It seems to me it was the afternoon, and I'd told the men that, and about fifty yards up the river, I couldn't believe it, I could see, Colonel Austin, I think, our battalion commander, I'm not sure, and here is this person walking up with the two white pistols, ... and it was General George Patton, and I could see George Patton doing this, [Mr. Hale makes a waving on gesture], which meant we're going to cross the river, and I thought, "Oh, no, we can't do it," but, you don't say that. See, to him, strategically, he knew what he was doing, but, tactically, ... it was a risky thing, because I knew our troops really were tired and weren't prepared for it. So, I led the crossing. We had rubber boats in darkness, and I lost quite a few people, but, we captured the ground, and, when you do this at night, you don't know what ... the situation is.


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