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a. Note:   son and heir age 22 in 1575 knighted at Whitehall jul 23 1603 living 1618 Sir William Blakiston Popish Recusant. (1553- ) son of John Blakiston & Elizabeth nee Bowes. Husband of Alice Claxton. His father had the sense not to offend the authorities but kept his Catholicism secret and in 1578 paid homage for his manor and took the Oath of Supremacy. Sir William, however, preferred to parade his Catholicism openly with disastrous consequences for the family. He was described in 1600 as 'the most obstinate and dangerous recusant in all these parts, whom no man for these 7 years past durst lay hands on'. He had to forfeit part of his estates to his brother Marmaduke and had to sell lands to pay recusancy fines for non-attendance of church. In 1607 he had some of his stock siezed and in 1609 he was confined to his manor house for his views. (1& 2)
  Sir William Blakiston, although knighted at Whitehall in 1603, preferred to parade his Catholicism openly, and with dangerous consequences for the family. In 1600, he was referred to as "the most obstinate and dangerous recusant in all these parts, whom no man for these seven years past by ‘durst lay hands on'", and part of his estates were given to his brother, Marmaduke by order of the Crown. It is known that he had to sell other lands in order to pay recusancy fines for non-attendance at church. In 1607, he had some of his stock seized, the bailiffs reporting that by virtue of an exchequer commission, "they seized 19 horses and manes, with one fillie; oxen, kyns, 3 steers and heifers, being goods of Sir William Blakiston, and took them away from Blaxton". Following an appearance before the Ecclesiastical Commission in 1609, Sir William was confined to his manor house because of his religious views. Other members of his family suffered similar treatment. Sir William's brother, Marmaduke, was arraigned in Durham Cathedral for Roman practices and is often mentioned in the proceedings of the Court of high Commission. Two of Sir William's nephews were expelled from their benefices for their royalism and Catholic views during the 1640's, viz. Thomas from Northallerton, and Ralph from Ryton. It is ironic that their brother, John, was a prominent Puritan and was to be one of the trial judges of Charles I. Sir William's second son, Ralph, also had lands seized and was in debt to William Lambton, for £ 240.


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