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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Mary Ellen /Quinton/: Birth: 30 Sep 1848 in Red Cliff Island, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland.

  2. James /Quinton/: Birth: 4 Dec 1851 in Red Cliff Island, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland. Death: 22 Jun 1897

  3. Elizabeth /Quinton/: Birth: 21 Jul 1854 in Red Cliff Island, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland. Death: 18 Aug 1905

  4. Hannah /Quinton/: Birth: 16 Oct 1856 in Red Cliff, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland.

  5. William White /Quinton/: Birth: 10 Nov 1858 in Red Cliff, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland. Death: 26 Apr 1925 in St. John's, Newfoundland

  6. Charles Henry /Quinton/: Birth: 19 Nov 1860 in Red Cliff, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland. Death: 22 Feb 1940

  7. Ann Grace /Quinton/: Birth: 15 Dec 1862 in Red Cliff, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland.

  8. Edward /Quinton/: Birth: ABT 31 Aug 1865. Death: 17 Oct 1946 in Tewksbury, Massachusetts

  9. Herbert /Quinton/: Birth: 11 Mar 1869 in Pinchers Point, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland. Death: 23 Aug 1941 in Charleston, Bonavista Bay, Newfoundland

  10. Edgar /Quinton/: Birth: ABT Dec 1871. Death: 3 May 1891


Notes
a. Note:   Y-DNA Haplogroup R1b, based on FTDNA kit 269039 Thanks to an autosomal DNA match with Garrett Moss, I now suspect that Charles Quinton's parents were likely to have been James Quinton and Sarah Moss
The statistical summary of the 1836 census shows that Red Cliff Island had a total of 11 dwelling houses. The population consisted of 35 males (17 under age 14, 17 who were aged 14 to 60, and 1 who was upwards of 60) and 31 females (14 under age 14, 16 aged 14 to 60, and 1 who was upwards of 60). There was 1 male servant (and no female servants) recorded [the column for the number of "Heads of Families who are Servants" is blank] There were 55 Protestant Episcopalians and 12 Roman Catholics.
The statistical summary of the 1845 census shows that Red Cliff Island had a total of 15 dwelling houses. The population consisted of 84 inhabitants: 23 males under age 14 years 20 males aged 14 to 70 1 male aged over 70 22 females under age 14 years 17 females aged 14 to 70 1 female over 70 There were 55 Protestant Episcopalians and 26 Roman Catholics There was 1 Protestant Episcopalian church
The statistical summary of the 1857 census shows that Red Cliff Island had 101 inhabitants: 14 males under 10 16 males 10 to 20 4 males 20 to 30 10 males 30 to 40 4 males 40 to 50 1 male above 50 to 70 3 males from 70 upwards 16 females under 10 12 females 10 to 20 6 females 20 to 30 8 females 30 to 40 2 females 40 to 50 3 females above 50 to 70 2 females from 70 upwards 17 married males 17 married females 100 people born in Nfld 1 person born in England 75 Church of England 26 Catholics 17 inhabited houses inhabited by 18 families no widowers 1 widow no orphans no paupers no deaf and dumb no blind no lunatics no idiots 9 births in the preceding year 3 deaths in the preceding year no marriages in the preceding year
The 1869 census shows populations as follows [along with details of age categories, etc] Tickle Cove, 311 Red Cliff Island, 95 Open Hall, 205 Indian Arm, 224 Southern Bay, 109 Musgrave Town, 352 There are categories for Male Indians, Female Indians, Colored Males, Colored Females... these columns are blank for every community listed in Bonavista Bay and also Trinity Bay. There are 3 people born in British Colonies living at Musgravetown, but otherwise the six communities that I listed above only have people born in Nfld, England, Ireland [with Nfld very much dominating]
I heard a tale once at my grandmother's place that Charles was a very sour and cantankerous person... I think the actual word that was used was either "crooked" or "contrary", and that his children pretended to be grieving at his funeral. I think I was told that Charles' grave is in Southern Bay or Princeton, right down by the water (to the point where it might actually be underwater during high tide).
Charles & Sarah's marriage record (in the Kings Cove Anglican records) states that Charles was from Red Cliff Island and Sarah from Tickle Cove. The baptisms of their first 7 children (in the Anglican records from Kings Cove) indicate that they lived at Red Cliff, although several of the children are listed as resident at Indian Arm (now Summerville) at the time of their marriages.
Charles & Sarah's marriage took place on the same day as Sarah's brother's John's marriage to Ann Gale. Both were witnessed by David Candon JP, and John Skiffington. https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-10505-68634-74?cc=1793777&wc=5479034
Note that the design on the headstones of Charles and Sarah is the same.
Geraldine Prince emailed me this on 21 Dec 2008: Here's the story as I heard it.... Charles and Sarah moved from Tickle Cove and settled at Pinchard's Point with their family. The younger children may have been born there. Anyway, Charles was walking down through the garden and he fell to the ground (July 10, 1873). He didn't get up and when they ran and checked on him they realized that he was dead. It was very sudden. They were a loyal Methodist family and since there was no Methodist cemetary in Princeton at that time they took him to the point at Indian Arm for burial. A few years later a severe storm with high seas washed away part of the cemetery and many of the graves were swept out to sea including his. After the storm ended the people of the area began the process of covering the graves that were partially exposed and they also picked up parts of headstones and placed them in the cemetery. Charles's grave had vanished but part of the headstone was recovered.


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