Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William Bennett LAIRD: Birth: 30 MAR 1890 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States. Death: OCT 1974 in East Orange, Essex, New Jersey, United States

  2. Edith Emily LAIRD: Birth: 2 MAY 1891 in New York, United States. Death: 11 FEB 1968 in Cleveland, Cuyahoga, Ohio, United States

  3. Grace LAIRD: Birth: 26 NOV 1892 in New York, United States. Death: 9 SEP 1976 in Lakeland, Polk, Florida, United States

  4. Ruth C. LAIRD: Birth: 27 MAR 1897 in Brooklyn, Kings, New York, United States. Death: 7 MAY 1966 in Waynesboro, Waynesboro (city), Virginia, United States

  5. Ida Raynor Laird: Birth: 15 APR 1902 in New York, New York, United States. Death: 14 APR 1961 in Clearwater, Pinellas, Florida, United States

  6. Mabel LAIRD: Birth: 31 AUG 1907 in Kings, New York, United States. Death: 4 JUL 1912 in a train wreck at Gibson, New York near Corning, New York, United States

  7. Phillip LAIRD: Birth: ABT 1909/10 in New York, United States. Death: 4 JUL 1912 in a train wreck at Gibson, New York near Corning, New York, United States


Sources
1. Title:   Jacqueline (Pierson) Hanke 1994-1998 (note: deceased 30 May 2000)
2. Title:   1870 United States Federal Census
3. Title:   Ancestry.com, <i>1910 United States Federal Census</i> (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006).
Text:   Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: <a href="http://www.archives.gov/research/census/publications-microfilm-catalogs-census/1910/index.html" target="_blank">NARA</a>.
4. Title:   Ancestry.com, <i>1900 United States Federal Census</i> (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004).
Text:   United States of America, Bureau of the Census. <i>Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900</i>. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
5. Title:   Ancestry.com
6. Title:   Birth Certificate
7. Title:   New York, State Census, 1875
8. Title:   1880 United States Federal Census
9. Title:   New York, State Census, 1892
10. Title:   New York, State Census, 1905
11. Title:   Ancestry.com, <i>1910 United States Federal Census</i> (Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006).
Text:   Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: <a href="http://www.archives.gov/research/census/publications-microfilm-catalogs-census/1910/index.html" target="_blank">NARA</a>.

Notes
a. Continued:   According to the 1900 census, she immigrated to the U.S. in 1868 when she was very young. She was killed in a train wreck with two of her children, Phillip and Mabel. ...............................................

b. Continued:   41 DEAD, 50 HURT AS EXPRESS HITS EXCURSION TRAIN
  At 65-Mile Speed Lackawanna Flier Crashes Into Crowded Cars Near Corning, NY
  ENGINEER IGNORES SIGNALS
  Two Day Coaches Split in Two and a Pullman Crumpled Up by the Onrushing Locomotive.
  VICTIMS KILLED IN SLEEP
  A Few Passengers Who Rise to Learn Cause of Delay Witnesses of Tragedy.
  SWIFTLY RUSH TO SUCCOR
  Injured Are Hurried to Corning Hospitals While Dead Are Laid Out for Identification.
  MANY VICTIMS FROM HERE
  Officials Blame Disaster on Express Engineer, Who, They Say, Ran By Warning Semaphore.
  Special to the New York Times.
  CORNING, N. Y., July 4.—Train No. 9, the regular train of the Delaware, Lacka- wanna & Western Railroad. which leaves Hoboken nightly at 9 o’clock and Is due here at 4:47 o’clock tho next morning, was halted near Gibson, a small town three miles east of here, shortly after 5 o’clock this morning. In front of It was . a freight train, stalled on the steep lncline to Gibson, by the pulling out of a drawhead. An engine from the paasehger train — two had been put on to surmount the grade at Groveland with a heavy excursion crowd bound for Buffalo and Niagara Falls — was detached and was striving to push the heavy freight train ahead to a siding, when the rails began to sing with the hum of an approaching train.
  Most of the passengers aboard No. 9 were asleep. Some few were dressed and out on the track watching the removal of the freight train. Through the heavy mist, which was crawling up the mountain from the Chemung River far below, these few passengers presently saw a glaring headlight sweep around the curve a few hundred feet back of their train, a curve which ends a straight stretch of track ten or more miles, along which every train of the division flies at topmost speed. The watching passengers had scarce time to scramble down the bank beside the track. Then the locomotive of United States Express Train 11, with ten heavy express cars behind it, crashed into the rear of a day coach, which, with one other directly ahead of it, formed the end of No. 9. Ahead of these were three Pullmans, a baggage car, and the engine and tender.
  As if they had been made of cardboard the day coaches parted down the middle, half of each toppling over on either side of the track, and the monster engine, 100 tons of steel, which an instant before had been moving at sixty-five miles an hour, cut into the rear steel Pullman, crumpled it up as if it had bean a tin can and came to a halt In the midst of this wreckage.
  In the debris lay forty-one persons Instantly killed or so injured that they died soon afterward. Between fifty and sixty others were pinned injured in the wreckage. The lists of the dead and injured in this worst disaster in years on the Lackawanna, which had previously had only two persons killed by train accidents since 1900, are as follows:
  THE IDENTIFIED DEAD. ARMSTRONG, Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAM M., 1,020 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. BRANDES, CHARLSE, 12 Folorn Street, Brooklyn. DYAK, HERMAN. Newark, N. J. ERWIN, Mrs. C. E., Chicago, Ill. FREEDMAN, SARAH, New York. HESS, Mrs. EDITH A., Scranton. Penn. IVEY, Dr. E. V., of Bellevue Hospital, New York; home in Suffolk, Va. JONES, Mrs. ANNA HILL, Scranton, Penn.
  <b>LAIRD, GEORGE, </b>188 Tenth Street, Brooklyn. N. Y. <b>LAIRD, Mrs. WILLIAM R., </b>Brooklyn. <b>LAIRD, PHILLIP, </b>2 years old, of Brooklyn. <b>LAIRD, MABEL, </b>5 years old, of Brooklyn.
  LOWERY, EVELYN, colored, 104 Oak Street Newark, N. J. NELSON, ANTON, Grove Street, Jersey City, N.J. NOVAK, ANTONIO, Scranton. Penn. PATOUSKI, M., immigrant, ticketed to Buffalo. PRATT, F. C.. 16 Hunt Avenue, Buffalo, traveling salesman. PRAVELOWSKI, REGINA P. Russia. REYNOLDS, Mrs. LILLIAN, 211 Spencer Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. SCHULTZ, ERNEST, Buffalo. SETTEDUCATI, Mrs. LUCY. 123 Baxter Street New York City. SMITH, JAMES, colored Pullman porter, Newark, N. J. ZIMMER, Mr. and Mrs. JOHN. Scranton. Penn.
  THE UNIDENTIFIED DEAD. WOMAN, with gold pendant on chain. amethyst setting and three pearl pennants. LARGE NEGRESS. about 45 years of age. wearing blouse dress, earrings and ring on one hand. GIRL, about 3 years, white dress. MAN of 35 or 40 years, black hair, striped suit, and diamond stick pin. WOMAN, blue dress and band ring. WOMAN, aged 30, wearing diamond ring, gold.
  Continued...
  The New York Times Published: July 5, 1912 Copyright © The New York Times
  http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9A06E5D61F31E233A25756C0A9619C946396D6CF ...............................................
  Corning (Gibson), NY Train Wreck, Jul 1912 Posted November 11th, 2007 by Stu Beitler  
  FATAL COLLISION
  EXPRESS TELESCOPES LACKAWANNA TRAIN FILLED WITH EXCURSIONISTS AT CORNING.
  VICTIMS KILLED IN SLEEP
  Elmira and Corning Hospitals Overcrowded with Victims, Many of Whom Were on Their Way to Niagara Falls.
  Corning, N. Y., July 5. -- Westbound Lackawanna passenger train No. 9, from New York, composed of two engines, a baggage car, three Pullmans and two day cars, in the order named, was demolished at Gibson, three miles east of Corning, at 5:25 o'clock a. m.More than forty persons were killed and between fifty and sixty persons were injured. Many of the victims were holiday excursionists bound to Niagara Falls, who had boarded the train at points along the Lackawanna line.
  The wreck was the worst in the history of the road. Its cause, according to WILLIAM SCHROEDER, engineer of the express, was his failure to see the signals set against his train. The morning was foggy and he said he couldn't make out the signals.
  The wrecked train stood on the main track blocked by extra freight train No. 61, which had become crippled. There was no flag out, according to SCHROEDER. The signals which SCHROEDER declared it was too foggy to see were just around the curve. The flying express plunged past them and crashed into the rear of No. 9, bringing death to more than two-score of its passengers.
  Identified Dead. Following is a list of the dead who have been identified:
  ARMSTRONG, WILLIAM A., Hokoben[sic], N. J. BRANDIES, MR. AND MRS. CHARLES, New York City, on their wedding trip. DUAK, HERMAN, Newark. ERWIN, MRS. C. E., Chicago. FETODUCATI, MRS. LUCY, New York City. HESS, MRS. EDITH A., Scranton, Pa. IVEY, DR. E. V., of Bellevue Hospital, New York, home, Suffolk, Va. JONES, MRS. ANNA HILL, Scranton, Pa.
  <b>LAIRD, GEORGE, Brooklyn. LAIRD, MRS. WILLIAM R., Brooklyn. LAIRD, PHILIP, two years old, Brooklyn. LAIRD, MABEL, five years old, Brooklyn.
  </b>LOWERY, EVELYN, negress, Newark. NOVAK, ANTONIO, Scranton. NELSON, ANTON, Jersey City. PRATT, F. C., Buffalo, traveling salesman. PATOUSKI, M., immigrant, ticketed to Buffalo. PRAVELOWSKI, REGINA P., Russia. REYNOLDS, MRS. LILLIAN, Brooklyn. SMITH, JAMES, negro, Pullman porter, Newark. SCHULTZ, ERNEST, Buffalo. ZIMMER, MR. AND MRS. J., Scrantan[sic].
  Of the injured, four of the unidentified died in the Corning Hospital. Several have nothing about their persons by means of which they could be identified.
  Eleven persons are being cared for in St. Joseph's Hospital in Elmira, while the others are in the Corning Hospital.
  There are eight women, three men with no identifying marks. There are a girl five years old, a woman with gold pin marked “F.G.A., 1909” and ring marked “L.B.” a girl three years old, a baby 16 months, a woman with gold pin marked “P.J.” a man 28 years old with ring marked “M.G. To F.P., '91.”
  Trainmen say that this loss of life was caused by the carelessness of the engineer of the express train who ran at a terrific speed past a frantically signalling [sic] flagman and the warning of a dropped semaphore arm. The dead, which filled to overflowing the morgues of the little town are in many instances so mangled that identification is almost impossible. The engine of the express train ripped its way through the two day coaches in the rear, killing instantly everyone in them, plowed on through half of a steel Pullman, throwing the sleeping car off the track, and then came to a standstill.
  Ogdensburg Advance and St. Lawrence Weekly Democrat 1912-07-11 ...............................................

c. Continued:   New York, New York, Marriage Index 1866-1937 Name: <b>William R Laird </b>Gender: Male Marriage Date: <b>28 Oct 1888 </b>Marriage Place: Kings, New York, USA Spouse: <b>Sarah Bennett </b>Certificate Number: 4220
  Source Information Ancestry.com. New York, New York, Marriage Index 1866-1937 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2014.
  Original data: Index to New York City Marriages, 1866-1937. Indices prepared by the Italian Genealogical Group and the German Genealogy Group, and used with permission of the New York City Department of Records/Municipal Archives.
  Description This index is your first step to marriage records from New York City, Kings County (Brooklyn), Manhattan, Queens, the Bronx, and Richmond County (Staten Island). Learn more... .................................................


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