Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Andrew Bird McARTHUR: Birth: 23 Dec 1842 in Quincy, Adams, IL. Death: 25 Mar 1882 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  2. Anna McARTHUR: Birth: Abt 1844 in Quincy, Adams, IL. Death: Abt 1849


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Elizabeth McARTHUR: Birth: Abt 1846 in Nauvoo, Hancock, IL.

  2. Daniel D. McARTHUR: Birth: 18 Aug 1848 in Iowa. Death: 8 Aug 1858 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, UT

  3. Sarah McARTHUR: Birth: Abt Oct 1849 in Deseret, Millard, UT.

  4. Hannah Susan McARTHUR: Birth: 1 Aug 1850 in Great Salt Lake, Utah. Death: 11 Aug 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, UT

  5. Emma Matilda McARTHUR: Birth: 8 Aug 1852 in Great Salt Lake, Utah. Death: 26 Aug 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, UT

  6. Caroline McARTHUR: Birth: 28 Feb 1858 in Great Salt Lake, Utah. Death: 20 Feb 1863 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  7. Edward Meeks McARTHUR: Birth: 20 Mar 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, UT. Death: 8 Jun 1915 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  8. Mahala McARTHUR: Birth: 11 Feb 1862 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 27 Feb 1863 in Saint George, Washington, UT


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Eugenia McARTHUR: Birth: 4 Dec 1860 in Pleasant Grove, Utah, UT. Death: 1 Feb 1941 in Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

  2. George McARTHUR: Birth: 16 Jun 1866 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 17 Jul 1867 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  3. Isabelle McARTHUR: Birth: 13 Jul 1868 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 1 Feb 1939 in Vineyard, Utah, UT

  4. James McARTHUR: Birth: 29 Jan 1871 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 17 Jun 1944 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  5. Emeline McARTHUR: Birth: 24 Feb 1874 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 18 Apr 1903 in Cedar City, Iron, UT

  6. Moroni McARTHUR: Birth: 25 Apr 1877 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 24 Apr 1973 in Saint George, Washington, UT


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Experience McARTHUR: Birth: Abt 1859 in Great Salt Lake, Utah.

  2. Margaret McARTHUR: Birth: 24 Nov 1861 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 14 Feb 1863 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  3. Miranda McARTHUR: Birth: 16 Jul 1865 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 30 Apr 1932 in Leeds, Washington, UT

  4. Experience McARTHUR: Birth: 14 Dec 1868 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 24 Jun 1869 in Saint George, Washington, UT


Family
Marriage:
Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Sybil McARTHUR: Birth: 23 Dec 1872 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 13 May 1889

  2. Duncan McARTHUR: Birth: 10 Aug 1875 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 25 Aug 1937 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  3. Levi McARTHUR: Birth: 8 Sep 1879 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 22 Sep 1882 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  4. Wilford Woodruff McARTHUR: Birth: 30 Apr 1884 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 7 May 1971 in Saint George, Washington, UT

  5. Arthur McARTHUR: Birth: 12 May 1886 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 14 Jul 1947 in Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, UT

  6. Ellen McARTHUR: Birth: 19 Apr 1890 in Saint George, Washington, UT. Death: 22 May 1957 in Saint George, Washington, UT


Notes
a. Note:   1880 United States Census 10-12 June 1880 Name Rel. S G R Age Born Occupation Fath Moth D. D. MC ARTHUR Self M M W 60 NY Farmer NH NY Matilda C. MC ARTHUR Wife M F W 60 NY Keep House NY NY Elizabeth MC ARTHUR Wife M F W 38 CANADA Keep House SCOT SCOT Mary MC ARTHUR Wife M F W 26 UT Keep House KY NY Edward M. MC ARTHUR Son S M W 20 UT Attend School NY NY Miranda MC ARTHUR Dau F W 14 UT At Home NY CANA Isabell MC ARTHUR Dau S F W 11 UT At Home NY CANA James MC ARTHUR Son S M W 9 UT At Home NY CANA Syble MC ARTHUR Dau S F W 7 UT NY CANA Emeline MC ARTHUR Dau S F W 6 UT NY CANA Duncan MC ARTHUR Son S M W 4 UT NY CANA Moroni MC ARTHUR Son S M W 3 UT NY CANA Levi MC ARTHUR Son S M W 9M UT NY UT ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Source Information: Census Place St. George, Washington, Utah Family History Library Film 1255339 NA Film Number T9-1339 Page Number 354D Latter-day Saint Biographical Encyclopedia Volume 1 Biographies
  McArthur, Daniel Duncan, president of the St. George Stake of Zion from 1888 to 1901, is the son of Duncan McArthur and Susan McKeen, and was born April 8, 1820, at Holland, Erie county, New York, where his earliest years were spent.
  He writes: My parents joined the Church in the spring of 1833, and I, believing the doctrines taught, became a member by baptism in 1838, in Missouri.
  Early in the year 1836 my father and family moved to Kirtland, Ohio. In the fall of 1838 many of the Saints from Ohio journeyed to Far West, Caldwell county, in the so-called Kirtland Camp; we were members of that organization, and located in Adam-Ondi-Ahman, Daviess county. Under threat of extermination in ten days, we were forced to leave that place, after which we made our abode for three months at Far West. Thence, leaving Missouri, we went to Quincy, Ill., where we arrived in the spring of 1839. While my father was absent on a two years' mission, I, together with my younger brothers, took care of the large family. In 1841, I married Miss Cordelia Clark.
  From Quincy father's family moved to Nauvoo, while I remained in Quincy. Here my wife died. After the death of the Prophet Joseph Smith (who was killed along with his brother Hyrum by a mob in Carthage, Illinois, on June 27, 1844), I went to Nauvoo, where I was ordained a Seventy in 1844. I married Miss Matilda C. Fuller, Dec. 14, 1845.
  Preparing to leave Nauvoo, I was engaged in wagon building and other occupations. My wife and I were endowed and sealed in the Nauvoo Temple, Feb. 1, 1846. In a day or two afterwards we crossed the Mississippi river on the ice and passed to the general camp ground of our people on Sugar creek. Thence, we traveled to Garden Grove. Here we built houses and fenced five hundred acres of land for the poor, who were unable to go further. Bridge building, road making, etc. were necessary occupations for us on our way to the Missouri river.
  In the spring of 1846 one of my brothers joined the Mormon Battalion. I remained with my father and family until 1848, when we crossed the plains, arriving in Salt Lake City in the fall of that year.
  I was called on a mission to Europe in 1852, and succeeded Andrew Ferguson in the presidency of the Dundee conference, in Scotland. Being released early in 1856, I was chosen second counselor to Elder James Ferguson, who presided over the Saints who crossed the Atlantic in the ship "Enoch Train." Reaching Iowa, a hand-cart company was given into my charge. By the blessings of God I landed safely in Salt Lake City, Oct. 2nd of said year, with all my passengers.
  Jan. 4, 1858, I was set apart as the senior president of the 57th quorum of Seventy. At the general conference held in October, 1861, I was called on a mission to settle in "Our Dixie." Thus I became one of the first settlers of St. George. In 1862, I was ordained a High Priest and called to act as first counselor to Bishop Robert Gardener. [p.337] Nov. 15, 1862, I was ordained a Bishop by Apostle Orson Pratt and set apart to preside over the Third Ward, St. George.
  In 1863 I was appointed to take charge of a train of sixty wagons (ox teams) and teamsters and go to the Missouri river to bring in the poor. May 14, 1864, I was elected a member of the High Council of the St. George Stake of Zion. I served in that capacity until Sept. 15, 1869, when I was called to act as presiding Bishop in southern Utah.
  In 1866 I was called to make another trip to the Missouri river after the poor, But was released by Bishop Edward Hunter, in order that I might attend to other duties. In 1868 I was again called to go with teams to the frontiers and bring in the poor Saints. I performed this mission to the satisfaction of the First Presidency.
  June 4, 1877, I was called on another mission to Great Britain, and labored principally in the Manchester conference. Returning home, I acted as first counselor to Elder Henry W. Naisbitt in leading a company of Saints home to Zion. We arrived in Salt Lake Lake City Oct. 3, 1878.
  March 20, 1881, I was set apart as second counselor to Pres. John D. T. McAllister, president of the St. George Stake of Zion.
  Sept. 26, 1888. I was unanimously chosen by the Council of the Apostles to succeed Pres. McAllister in the presidency of the St. George Stake, and to that position I was set apart by Apostle John W. Taylor, Dec. 17, 1888.
  At various times I have been called to do military and police service notably during the troublous times of Nauvoo,lawfully defending our liberties and homes against the base and cruel assaults of bigoted citizens, which were headed chiefly by persons who called themselves ministers of the gospel. In Utah, during the Walker, Ute and Navajo raids and wars, I took part, also in the so-called Buchanan war. I served for some time as major under Gen. Daniel H. Wells and was afterwards commissioned colonel of infantry by Governor Durkee. During the anti-polygamy raids I was hunted for six years. The officers succeeded in finding me in April, 1890, and in order to save my family from exposure, insult and insolence of court officials, I pleaded guilty to the charge of unlawful cohabitation, and was fined $321.00, which was promptly paid.
  Having almost totally lost my eyesight, I was honorably released from the presidency of the St. George Stake, June 14, 1901, and ordained a Patriarch in the Church. And now, in conclusion, I bear this my solemn testimony: God has in these last days spoken from the heavens and organized His Church through the instrumentality of the Prophet, Joseph Smith. He has also spoken through his (Joseph's) successors until the present time; and to God and the Lamb be all praise forever. Amen."
  Our Pioneer Heritage - Volume 3 A Treasury of Indian Stories In Pioneer Days A Tribute
  Daniel McArthur, a bishop in the pioneer settlement of St. George, was the owner of a field of corn and on several occasions discovered that a considerable amount had been stolen while he was presiding at Sacrament meeting. One Sunday he decided to catch the culprit so he hid among the stalks and waited. Before long he heard the sound of corn being pulled. He crept quietly toward the intruder and hit him over the back with a piece of wood. The Indian already had one bag full of plump ears and was proceeding to fill another when surprised by Bishop McArthur. He was asked why he took the corn and answered that he was very hungry. The Indian was then told to take the bags to the McArthur home where he would be given a meal, and that any time he was hungry to go there and he would be fed. He was a regular visitor, at least once a week, for many years. The Indian, Caboose was baptized by Mr. McArthur into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints some years after this incident, along with thirty-four other members of his tribe. ?Emma Cottam McArthur


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