Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Olive Vincent: Birth: 23 Jan 1849. Death: 11 Feb 1905 in Farina, Fayette, Illinois, USA

  2. Lucinda Vincent: Birth: Feb 1850 in Milton, Rock, Wisconsin, USA.

  3. Henry Vincent: Birth: 1855 in Wisconsin, USA. Death: in Y

  4. Rupre Vincent: Birth: in Illinois, USA. Death: 1880


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Russell Edward Vincent: Birth: 21 Mar 1870 in Farina, Fayette, Illinois, USA. Death: 20 Sep 1938 in Gentry, Benton, Arkansas, USA

  2. Hattie Vincent: Birth: 1875 in Illinois, USA.


Sources
1. Page:   Database online.
2. Title:   OneWorldTree
Page:   Database online.
Author:   Ancestry.com
Publication:   Name: The Generations Network, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA;
Address:   www.ancestry.com
Givenname:   www.ancestry.com
Name:   www.ancestry.com
RepositoryId:   R1
Addressname:   www.ancestry.com
Link:   http://www.ancestry.com
Link:   http://www.ancestry.com
Link:   http://www.ancestry.com

Notes
a. Note:   Edward Vincent 1820-1875 Jon Saunders </isapi.dll?c=m&htx=v&siteid=EdyGAE&memberid=000001> - Apr 6, 2009 "The Sabbath Recorder", Vol 31, No 22, p 3, May 27, 1875. In Farina, Ill., May 13th, 1875, of bronchial consumption, Mr. Edward Vincent, in the 55th year of his age. Mr. Vincent was born in the town of Almond, Allegany Co., N. Y. He made a profession of religion in his eighteenth year, under the preaching of Eld. James H. Cochrane, and joined the Second Alfred Church. He was a student, for a time, of Alfred Academy. In 1846, he with his father's family moved to Wisconsin, finally settling in Milton, Rock county. In April, 1849, he was married to Harriet L. Crandall, who died in 1868. In 1857, Mr. Vincent commenced the study of law with a law firm in Janesville, Wis., and in 1859, was admitted to practice at the bar of Rock county. In 1864, he moved to Farina, Ill., to seek a warmer climate on account of his health. In 1865, he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Illinois. In January, 1869, he was married to Lydia O. Maxson, who now mourns his departure. While a citizen of Wisconsin, Mr. Vincent served two terms in the Legislature of the State, in which he took high rank in ability, and was chiefly instrumental in securing the passage of an act relieving Seventh-day Baptists from the service of civil process, and from serving on juries on the Sabbath, and also securing some other privileges which are now enjoyed in other states. Mr. Vincent took rank as a judge of law and as a pleader among the ablest lawyers of Fayette county, Ill. He was an orator. Gifted with a lively imagination, a ready utterance, elegant diction, and possessing a disciplined and well-stored mind, he was not easily surpassed in an off-hand speech on varied subjects. He often made powerful and telling temperance and political addresses. His last illness, which commenced the 4th of last March, was at first acute and painful, but it settled into a gradual decay of his physical and mental powers until he passed away without a struggle, as if falling asleep. He often expressed himself during his sickness as deeply regretting the way he had lived, and as having sought and obtained the forgiveness of God and was prepared to die. He leaves a wife and five children. His funeral was held Sabbath afternoon, May 15th, and was attended by a large concourse of people. A sermon was preached on the occasion from Matt. 24: 44. O. U. W.
  Edward Vincent 1820-1875 Jon Saunders </isapi.dll?c=m&htx=v&siteid=EdyGAE&memberid=000001> - Apr 6, 2009 "The Sabbath Recorder", Vol 31, No 22, p 3, May 27, 1875. In Farina, Ill., May 13th, 1875, of bronchial consumption, Mr. Edward Vincent, in the 55th year of his age. Mr. Vincent was born in the town of Almond, Allegany Co., N. Y. He made a profession of religion in his eighteenth year, under the preaching of Eld. James H. Cochrane, and joined the Second Alfred Church. He was a student, for a time, of Alfred Academy. In 1846, he with his father's family moved to Wisconsin, finally settling in Milton, Rock county. In April, 1849, he was married to Harriet L. Crandall, who died in 1868. In 1857, Mr. Vincent commenced the study of law with a law firm in Janesville, Wis., and in 1859, was admitted to practice at the bar of Rock county. In 1864, he moved to Farina, Ill., to seek a warmer climate on account of his health. In 1865, he was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Illinois. In January, 1869, he was married to Lydia O. Maxson, who now mourns his departure. While a citizen of Wisconsin, Mr. Vincent served two terms in the Legislature of the State, in which he took high rank in ability, and was chiefly instrumental in securing the passage of an act relieving Seventh-day Baptists from the service of civil process, and from serving on juries on the Sabbath, and also securing some other privileges which are now enjoyed in other states. Mr. Vincent took rank as a judge of law and as a pleader among the ablest lawyers of Fayette county, Ill. He was an orator. Gifted with a lively imagination, a ready utterance, elegant diction, and possessing a disciplined and well-stored mind, he was not easily surpassed in an off-hand speech on varied subjects. He often made powerful and telling temperance and political addresses. His last illness, which commenced the 4th of last March, was at first acute and painful, but it settled into a gradual decay of his physical and mental powers until he passed away without a struggle, as if falling asleep. He often expressed himself during his sickness as deeply regretting the way he had lived, and as having sought and obtained the forgiveness of God and was prepared to die. He leaves a wife and five children. His funeral was held Sabbath afternoon, May 15th, and was attended by a large concourse of people. A sermon was preached on the occasion from Matt. 24: 44. O. U. W.


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