Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Susannah Wood: Birth: ABT 1770 in Greenbrier County (now Monroe County), (West) Virginia. Death: BEF APR 1842

  2. William WOOD: Birth: Bet. 1776-1779 in Greenbrier County (now Monroe County), (West) Virginia. Death: ABT SEP 1835 in Fayette County, (West) Virginia

  3. Bailey Wood: Birth: ABT 1785 in Greenbrier County (now Monroe County), (West) Virginia. Death: 1851 in Nicholas County, (West) Virginia

  4. Nancy Wood: Birth: ABT 1785. Death: 1 JUL 1833 in 4 miles above Gauley Bridge, Fayette County, (West) Virginia

  5. James Wood: Birth: ABT 1790 in Greenbrier County (now Monroe County), (West) Virginia. Death: 13 JAN 1859 in Fayette County, (West) Virginia

  6. Catherine Wood: Birth: ABT 1794.

  7. Elizabeth Wood: Birth: 1796 in Greenbrier County (now Monroe County), (West) Virginia. Death: 1828 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia


Notes
a. Note:   1781 "Scarcely a month after Lord Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown, but a full year before the Indian phases of the Revolutionary War ended, Alderson moved to place the Baptist faith on a more permanent footing in the Greenbrier region. On November 24, 1781, he organized the Greenbrier Baptist Church at Alderson. Its twelve original members were John Alderson, Mary Alderson, Thomas Alderson, John Kippers, John Shepperd, John Skaggs, Katherine Skaggs, Joseph Skaggs, Lucy Skaggs, Bailey Wood, Ann Wood, and James Wood. On May 24, 1783, the members decided to erect a meetinghouse on an acre of land near Baughman's Ford, on the Greenbrier River, provided by William Morris, Sr., for that Purpose and for a "publick place of Interement to Bury the Dead." By July 24, 1784, the building, seventeen by twenty-five feet with a chimney in the middle, was suitable for use, although not complete." [Source: A History of Greenbrier Co. (WV) by Otis K. Rice pg. 193]
  1782 Personal Property Tax List Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Bailey Wood 1 Poll, 0 Slaves, 0 Horses, 2 Cattle, Amount 9/0/0 [Source: Need to check! Does not match figures in following:]
  "The 1782 Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Personal Property Tax List" transcribed by Jeffrey C. Weaver, July 18, 1998. He writes: "This Tax list as very difficult to read. I did the best I could, but there are numerous mistakes no doubt. Please consult the original records before making a determination on what they say. Hopefully this record will serve as a source of Clues and should not be considered definative." Bailey Wood is listed in Mr. Wm. Hamilton's district with 1 Poll, 0 Slaves, 1 Horse, 2 Cattle, and no amount of tax. [Source: http://www.ls.net/~newriver/va/grnb1782.htm]
  1783 Tax List http://genealogytrails.com/wva/greenbrier/1783TaxList.htm
  1785 Taxable Property List Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Wood, Bailey http://genealogytrails.com/wva/greenbrier/1785Tax-List.htm
  1786 Tax List http://www.melungeons.com/genealogy/1786greenbrier.htm
  1787 Tax List list used for the 1790 reconstructed Virginia Census: Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Bailey Wood 0-0-0-39
  1785-1787 Wood-Woods Surname Monroe Co.,WV Grantee Deed Index References Date Grantee Grantor Kind of Instrument Bk Pg Brief Description 1785 Woods, Bailey -- Sur R S 3 161 280A Gbr River 1787 Wood, Bailey -- Sur R S 3 15 450A Gbr River [Source: http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/7054/Families/Wood/woodmon.html]
  1788 Land Grant of Bailey Wood for 450 acres on Greenbrier River listed as Greenbrier County, Virginia
  CGB 18 p269-270 31 July 1788 Bailey Wood 450a Greenbrier Co. on the S side o[cut off] http://www.directlinesoftware.com/Pool/monroe.txt
  31 July 1788 Wood, Bailey. grantee. Location: Greenbrier County. Description: 450 acres on the south side of Greenbrier River adjoining the land or James Givin and the land of Mathias Keen. Source: Land Office Grants No. 18, 1788-1789, p. 269 (Reel 84). See also the following surname(s): Woods. (in file)
  1790 "As early as 1790 the families of James Lykens, James Taylor, Bailey Wood, William Parrish, and others, settled on the present site of Ansted as "sqatters", who occupied the land without any title. The same year these pioneer settlers built the first church to be erected in Fayette County. It was a log building know as Hopewell Baptist church, and stood on the Tyree land immediately in the rear of present Fountain Neal home. [Source: "History of Fayette County" 1926, pg. 482]
  1790 A group of settlers arrived around 1790 on the present site of Ansted. This group of "squatters" lacked legal title to the land. Among them were the families of James Lykens, William Parrish, James Taylor, and Bailey Woods. [Source: Early History of Fayette County; from West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia, compiled by Hardesty; online http://www.statehousegirls.net/wv/counties/fayette/]
  1791 Personal Property Tax List Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Wood, Bailey http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/Greenbrier/1791PersonalA/09.jpg
  1796 Personal Property Tax List Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Bealey Wood 1 Poll, 0 Slaves, 3 Horses
  1796 Personal Property Tax List Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia Bailey Wood 2 white tithes 4 horses
  9 July 1796 Gwin, Joseph. grantee. Location: Greenbrier County. Description: 75 acres on waters of Kellies Creek a branch of Greenbrier river adjoining the land of Bailey Wood, John Dixon &c. Source: Land Office Grants No. 35, 1795-1796, p. 585 (Reel 101). See also the following surname(s): Guin, Guyne, Gwinn.
  Monroe County Residents of 1799 Wood: Bailey (4)-Benjamin-John-William [Source: A History of Monroe County, West Virginia; online https://archive.org/stream/ahistorymonroec00mortgoog#page/n538/mode/2up/search/wood]
  1799 Tax List Monroe County, (West) Virginia Bailey Wood 1 Poll, 0 Slaves, 7 Horses
  1799 30 July 1799, Robert Gwin, Greenbrier county - 30 acres on the waters of Pollie's Creek a branch of Greenbrier River adjoining the land of James Gwin & Bailey Wood; LOTW 12935 issued 13 July 1782. [Lib. of VA database, Grants 42, p. 485] [Source: Descendants of Robert Gwin of Augusta Co, Virginia; online http://www.riverduck.com/genealogy/gwin/D1.htm]
  1803 August 16 1803 Bailey Wood to William Graham, 127 acres for $1.00 on Greenbrier River adj. James Graham. [Source: Monroe Co., (W)VA Deed Book 1 (1799-1805) from "Monroe County (W) Virginia Abstracts" compiled by Larry G. Shuck, pg. 280-81.]
  1804 March 20, 1804 Baily Wood and wife Nancy Wood to Robert Gwinn, 323 acres for five shillings adj. James Graham and James Gwinn. [Source: Monroe Co., (W)VA Deed Book 1 (1799-1805) from "Monroe County (W) Virginia Abstracts" compiled by Larry G. Shuck, pg. 330-331.]
  21 September 1804 Jarred, David. grantee. Location: Monroe County. Description: 149 acres on the south side of Greenbrier River adjoining the land of Moses Gwin, Bailey Wood. Source: Land Office Grants No. 52, 1803-1804, p. 422 (Reel 118).
  By 1804 Bailey Wood had disposed of the 450 acres land grant he received in 1788.
  1810 U.S. Federal Census searching....
  1820 U.S. Federal Census searching....is he with one of his children?
  1826-1842: This indenture made the 21st day of September one thousand and eight hundred and twenty six between James Wood and Polly his wife, Bailey Wood and Lucertia his wife, William Wood and Mary his wife, Richard Skaggs and Susannah his wife, Martin McGraw and Nancy his wife, Samuel McGraw and Elizabeth his wife, Katherine Wood, heirs and legal representatives of Bailey Wood, deceased, and Nancy Wood widow of Bailey Wood, deceased, of the county of Nicholas and state of Virginia of the one part and John Alderson of the County of Monroe and state aforesaid of the other party witnesseth that the said heirs and the widow of Bailey Wood, deceased, for and in consideration of the sum of one dollar to them in hand paid the receipt wherein is hereby acknowledged, have barganied and by these presents do bargain and sell unto the said John Alderson and his heirs a certain tract or parcel of land containig one hundred acres more or less lying on the south side of the Greenbrier river in Monroe County adjoining the lands of Will___ Johnson and Clarence Graham and bounded as followth. To wit: Beginning at a popular and beech corner to John Lusk on the south side of the river and with his line S12deg E74 poles to 2 beech's S55 deg E 64 poles to a poplar and sugar tree E 22 poles to a poplar and white oak neigh a draugh S 75 deg E 38 poles to 2 buckeye trees N__ 27 poles to a buckeye and sugar tree N 22 deg W 8 poles to 2 elm's N 30 deg _ 50 poles to 2 hickories N 10 deg E 42 poles to 2 buckeye's N 23 deg N 36 poles crossing the river to 2 beech on the river bank and from there to the beginning with all its appurtenances. To have and to hold the said tract or parcel of land with its appurtenances with all singular appurtenances ________thereinto belonging and the said heirs______aforesaid do warrant with the said John Alderson the said tract or parcel of land from themselves, from their heirs , executors and administrators and from all and every person aforesaid will warrant and forever defend in witness whereof we have hereto set our hands and seal this day and date first above written.
  James Wood Polly X Wood Bailey Wood Luccretia X Wood William Wood Mary X Wood Richard Skaggs Susannah X Skaggs Martin McGraw Nancy X McGraw Samuel McGraw Elizabeth X McGraw Katherine X Wood Nancy X Wood Nicholas County to wit: We William Carnefix and James Skaggs, Justice of the Peace of the county of Nicholas and the state of Virginia do hereby certify that James Wood, Bailey Wood, William Wood, Richard Skaggs, Martin McGraw, Samuel McGraw parties to a certain deed bearing date 21st September 1826 and hereunto annexed personally appeared before us in our county aforesaid and acknowledged the same to be their act and deed desired us to ratify the said acknowledgement to the clerk of the said county and of Monroe in order that the said deed may be recorded. Given under our names and seals this 21st day of September 1826.
  W. Carnefix James Skaggs Nicholas county to wit: We William Carnefix and James Skaggs, Justices of the peace in the county of Nicholas aforesaid in the state of Virginia do hereby certify the Polly Wood, wife of James Wood, Lucertia Wood wife of Bailey Wood, Mary Wood wife of William Wood, Susannah Skaggs wife of Richard Skaggs, Nancy McGraw wife of Martin McGraw, Elizabeth McGraw wife of Samuel McGraw, Katherine Wood and Nancy Wood, widow of Bailey Wood, deceased, parties to a certain deed bearing date the 21st of September 1826 and hereinto annexed personally appeared befor us in our county aforesaid and being examined privately and apart from their said husbands and having deed aforesaid fully explained to them then the said Polly Wood, Lucertia Wood, Mary Wood, Susannah Skaggs, Nancy McGraw, Elizabeth McGraw, Katherine Wood and Nancy Wood, widow of Bailey Wood, deceased, acknowledge the same to be their names and declared that they had willingly signed ___ ___ ____ ___ the same and that they __ __ ___ __ __.
  W. Carnefix James Skaggs Monroe county clerks office February 10, 1842: This deed of bargain and sale from Bailey Wood's heirs to John Alderson was acknowledged before two Magestrates in the county of Nicholas and certified and admitted to record.
  Test: Geo. Hutchinson, Jr, Clerk [Source: Fox, Vernon A. Nicholas County, (West) Virginia Land Deed. Heirs of Bailey Wood to John Alderson. 21 September 1826. e-mail. May 31, 2001]
  *****
  Excerpts of publications mentioning Baily Wood Sr.:
  HISTORY OF CLAYTON COMMUNITY By Mr. C. H. Graham 1923 In writing a history of our community, we are at somewhat of a loss to know just where the boundary line should be located. In the early settlement of our community, the lines that bounded a given neighborhood were much farther extended than at a later period when settlements and communities became more thickly peopled. In the first instance neighbors were few and far apart and people living eight or ten miles apart, were often considered neighbors and belonging to the same community. As a community becomes more densely populated the boundary lines of that community become shortened, and only include those living in one immediate vicinity. Therefore, in describing the events that took place in the early settlement of our community, we shall reach out to what was then considered as a community neighborhood and in speaking of more recent events, we shall confine ourselves more particularly to the circle which now composes our local community. Up until less than a half century ago the Clayton and Griffith Creek neighborhoods were considered as one community. We shall, therefore, first speak of the early settlement of this larger circle. The first grant of land made to any one in this geographical boundary was granted to Colonel James Graham who was a pioneer settler of the Lowell Community which is located about six miles to the south of us. This grant called for two-hundred and eighty- six acres, and included the site of the Clayton post office, and was made in the year 1786, one hundred and thirty-seven years ago. The parchment upon which this grant was written is now in the possession of the writer and is in a good state of preservation. It is signed by Edmond Randolph, Esq. Governor of Virginia. The first permanent settlers on these lands were, Joseph Graham and his family, who settled here in the year 1813, one hundred and ten years ago. It is true that there were two or three other transitory settlers who had temporarily located here before the coming of Graham, principally for the purpose of hunting the wild game then so plentiful. Instead of locating a permanent home these settlers had no title or claim to the land on which they lived and were termed "squatters". Among these were one Martin McGraw, who lived about one-half mile north of the present post office, and Bailey Woods whose cabin stood about the same distance westward. These settlers remained but a few short years until they migrated farther west and settled again in Fayette County. Many of their descendants are still to be found, some of whom became prominent men. Among the descendants of Bailey Woods were his son Eli, who became a prominent Baptist preacher in Fayette and adjoining counties; also Dr. M. L. Wood, an able Baptist divine of Huntington is a descendant of the original Bailey Woods. [Source: Histories of 58 WV Communities - Chapter 20: Summers County, Clayton - Forest Hill - HISTORY OF CLAYTON COMMUNITY By Mr. C. H. Graham, 1923; WebRoots.org - Nonprofit Library for Genealogy & History-Related Research online http://www.webroots.org/library/usahist/howvc011.html]
  A HISTORY OF GREENBRIER County, West Virginia, by Otis K. Rice, states that Bailey Wood was instrumental in organizing the first Baptist Church in the area of Woodville, now known as Ansted, (Fayette County, West Virginia). At that time it was still Greenbrier County, Virginia. The church was called Hopewell Baptist Church. Shirley Donnelly, in an article he wrote for the FAYETTE TRIBUNE, unknown date*, stated, "The first Baptist church at Ansted was formed in 1796. It was composed of members of the Likens, Scaggs, Coleman and Wood families, a group of squatters, who were the first settlers of the community where Ansted is built today. About the year 1800, they built a log building and occupied it as their house of worship." Before this, according to A HISTORY OF MONROE COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, Pastor John Alderson of the Greenbrier River area had organized the Old Greenbrier Church, the first Baptist organization west of the Alleghenies, in November 1781. However, some have stated the year to be 1787. Initially, there were twelve members, including Bailey Wood, Ann Wood, and James Wood. John, Katherine, Joseph, and Lucy Skaggs were also listed as members. Bailey had owned property at the mouth of Wolf Creek which is now in Summers County (at Lowell). Around 1792 is when he became a "squatter" on land in Fayette County when it was still Greenbrier County. Then his property fell within the Monroe County boundary when it was created in 1799. He moved to Nicholas County before 1820, but his property fell within Fayette County upon its creation in 1831. The family moved only once, though they appeared to move several times due to the changing of County boundaries. Notes from HISTORY OF SUMMERS COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA, by James H. Miller: "Baily Wood had a cabin near the foot of Keeney's Knob, and also Martin McGraw, where A. H. Honaker now lives, but they never acquired title; or if so, sold out their claims before they had ripened into patent." [Source: Kitty S. Barrera's gedcom file Royal Houses, West Virginia Hillbillies, and Texas Pioneers; online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=kbarrera&id=I00733]
  *Article by Shirley Donnelly mentioned above was found in the 12 October 1972 issue of the Beckley Post-Herald (in file)
  Other publications mentioning Bailey Wood and/or time period that he lived: A History of the Rise and Progress of the Baptists in VA by Robert Semple, pg. 13 [Note: I found this publication online but there was no mention of Bailey Wood on pg. 13. I skimmed through the entire book and found only one section that pertained to the Greenbrier area.] Religion on the American Frontier, The Baptists 1783-1830 by William Sweet, pg. 128-144, 147 Great Awakenings in Virginia by Gewehr pg. 106-137 Allegheny Frontier by Rice pg. 273-278


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