Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Robert Livingston: Birth: 16 Dec 1708 in Clermont, Columbia Co., New York. Death: Nov 1790 in Clermont, Columbia Co., New York

  2. Peter Van Brugh Livingston: Birth: 3 Nov 1710 in Albany, Albany Co., New York. Death: 28 Dec 1792 in Elizabeth(town), Union Co., New Jersey

  3. John Livingston: Birth: Apr 1714 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.

  4. Philipus (Philip) Livingston: Birth: 15 Jan 1715/1716 in Albany, Albany Co., New York. Death: 12 Jun 1778 in York, York Co., Pennsylvania

  5. Henry Livingston: Birth: 5 Apr 1719 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.

  6. William Livingston: Birth: 30 Nov 1723 in Albany, Albany Co., New York. Death: 25 Jul 1790 in Elizabeth(town), Union Co., New Jersey

  7. Martha Sarah Livingston: Birth: Nov 1725 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.

  8. Alida Livingston: Birth: 18 Jul 1728 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.

  9. Catherine Livingston: Birth: 1729/1730 in Albany, Albany Co., New York.


Notes
a. Note:   !Philip Livingston was the Second Lord of Livingston Manor. He married Catherine Van Brugh and lived in Albany, New York, serving as Secretary of Indian Affairs in the latter part of his father Robert Livingston's life. His sons of note were Peter Van Brugh Livingston (Yale College, 1731), Philip Livingston (Yale College, 1737), a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and William Livingston (Yale College, 1741), first governor of New Jersey. Philip Livingston apprenticed with an Uncle Schuyler as a merchant in Albany. He was active in the Canada trade. He took part in the battle of Port Royal in 1710 and subsequently was appointed a colonel in the provincial army. He built the first iron forge in New York in 1740 which took three years to build. The ore came from "Ore Hill" and the Chatsfield and Davis ore beds at Salisbury, 15 miles away, transported by Horse and muleback. He manufactured links for the second chain across the Hudson River at West Point, much heavier than those broken by General Vaughn in his upriver raid on Kingston and Clermont. The Livingstons owned a portion of the Salisbury mines. He had an elegant house on Broad Street in New York City. He offered large leaseholds and attracted a large number of tenants to the manor. He built a church in each tenant village. He died in New York City, February 4, 1749, after the truce in the hostilities with the French. There were two funerals, one in New York City, and one on the Manor.


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