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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Timothy Mather: Birth: 9 Oct 1711 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut. Death: 18 Dec 1800 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut

  2. Joseph Mather: Birth: 23 Feb 1712/1713 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut. Death: 5 Feb 1788 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut

  3. Ruth Mather: Birth: 3 Dec 1715 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut. Death: 4 Dec 1790 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut

  4. Catherine Mather: Birth: 11 Jan 1717/1718 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut. Death: 14 Dec 1799 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut

  5. Moses Mather: Birth: 23 Feb 1719 in Lyme, New London Co., Connecticut. Death: 21 Sep 1806 in Darien, Fairfield Co., Connecticut


Notes
a. Note:   !Captain Timothy Mather was only six years of age when his family removed from Dorchester, Massachusetts to Lyme, Connecticut. A year later his father, Richard, was dead at the young age of 35. Although the future of these children may have seemed bleak, this family of three sons and one daughter, of the Lyme branch, has produced by far the greatest number of Mather descendants, outnumbering both the Windsor and Suffield branches. Captain Timothy Mather's great-grandfather was Reverend Richard Mather, the first Mather to arrive in America. Reverend Mather was excommunicated from the Church of England and walked with his family to Bristol where they waited a month and sailed for New England, arriving at Dorchester on August 17, 1635. By the time Timothy Mather reached manhood the Queen Anne's War had erupted. The settlements of Berwick, Haverhill, Exter, and Deerfield had been attacked by French and Mohawk raiding parties in the winter of 1704. The attack was especially painful to this family as the cousin of their father, Eunice Mather, wife of the Reverend John Williams of Deerfield, was murdered along with two of her family. Reverend Williams, his daughter Eunice, and the remaining children were taken to the Jesuit fort near Montreal, Quebec. The two youngest children, their Negro woman, and Mrs. Eunice (Mather) Williams, weak from recent child- birth, were brutally murdered. In all 200 were captured from all settlements, about 120 from Deerfield. The Connecticut and Massachusetts militia rallied to the northern settlements and for almost ten years, until 1713, protected the Connecticut River Valley from other such atrocities. Timothy Mather was a Captain and his younger brother Joseph a Lieutenant in the militia in those years.


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