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  1. Edwin Frank "Eddie" Knapp: Birth: 12 OCT 1923 in Los Angeles Co., California. Death: 23 APR 1944 in Austria, Europe


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Notes
a. Note:   Daily News / Daily News Centennial (03/06/2011) Excerpts from published bit's in our predecessor, The Van Nuys News, in 1951-52. The making of a suburb, By Andrea Hescheles, Correspondent Drilling operations revive Valley 'Black Gold' search - Nearby acres of the land owned by the Knapp brothers of Canoga Park, where efforts to bring in a paying well are being continued by the Canoga Oil Co. despite discouraging results of operations during the latter part of last year. (April 19, 1951) Oil flow in commercial quantity reported on West Valley ranch - Shallow wells on the 170-acre Knapp ranch at the west terminus of Vanowen St. in Canoga Park. The wells, less than 1200 feet deep, are each producing more than 50 barrels a day... Secrecy has surrounded operations which are the result of promotional work by W. J. "Bill" McCarthy, brother of Glenn McCarthy, widely known hotel man of Texas. (May 22, 1952) A Day In The Park October 25, 1990 - Karen Kingsbury Knapp Ranch Park 25000 Kittridge St., West Hills Size: 82 acres. Facilities: Three baseball diamonds, outdoor basketball court, children's play area, football field, picnic area, four tennis courts. Hours: 9 a.m. to dusk daily. Information: (818) 887-9800. The rolling hills that make up Knapp Ranch Park's trilevel facility was the prize ranch of Walter Knapp. But in 1962, Knapp moved from the area and sold the land to the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department for roughly $200,000, with one stipulation-that the park be dedicated to the memory of Knapp's son, Edwin Frank Knapp, who as a child loved playing on his father's wooded ranch, was 21 when he was killed during World War II. Today, a plaque stands at the park's entrance in memory of Edwin Knapp. "It's a quiet park, a very nice place to take a family or spend an afternoon," said Al Goldfarb, a spokesman for the department. "And that's how Walter Knapp wanted it to be used." Knapp Ranch park, which is built on a hill that is graded into three flat planes, has an outdoor basketball court on its lowest level, tennis courts on its middle level and baseball diamonds at its peak. Nearly all the trees that made up the original ranch are still on the grounds, and there are picnic tables scattered among them. It does not have the community events that mark some parks, but is is one of the few places in the San Fernando Valley that still has the peace and tranquility of 20 years ago, Goldfarb said. [Frank Knapp Ranch / A Day In The Park - Los Angeles Times, http://articles.latime.com/1990-10-25/news/vw-4037 1 knapp-ranch-park] NOTE: The article contains a major error: Edwin "Eddie" Frank Knapp was the son of Frank John Knapp, Jr.; nephew of Walter Anton Knapp. Also, the ranch may have been co-owned by Frank Jr. and his younger brother Walter, and they may have partnered in developing oil wells on that same property or other acreage in the area in the 1950's. Frank Jr. died July 16, 1990, and Walter (with the possible exception of sister Elizabeth who remains unaccounted for) was Frank's last remaining first degree relative who may have inherited the property upon Frank's death. It's also possible that Frank had signed over the property to Walter at a prior time with a stipulation that Edwin be memorialized with a donated portion of land to be used as a park. adding to the confusion... January 9, 1992 / Kevin Baxter / Times Staff Writer, page 2 Knapp Ranch Park, a sprawling 57-acre plot of land abutting the Los Angeles and Ventura county lines in Canoga Park, was sold to the city of Los Angeles by Walter Knapp 30 years ago. Knapp agreed to the bargain-basement price of $244,000 only after the city promised that the park would be named for his son, who died in World War II. As a result, the park's original development plans include instructions for a plaque that would read: "Knapp Park - Named in memory of Edwin Frank Knapp, 1923-1944." Gold Mines of Los Angeles County - By Hugh Blanchard ...Two miles up the same road is the abandoned Knapp Ranch. A Mr. Kelly who operated a gas station and restaurant on the nearby Old Ridge Route, in operation from 1915 to 1933, originally built the ranch, consisting of several houses. In 1962, a wealthy businessman named Frank Knapp acquired the property and operated it for many years as a hunting lodge and horse ranch. After his death in 1988, it was acquired by the Forest Service in 1995 in a land exchange. One remaining wild stallion still roams there, which is confirmed by the abundance of horse droppings. The road is gated shortly above and below the ranch. [http://www.lagoldmines.com/index.php?page=356299.txt] Redrock Canyon - April 2001 - By Hugh Blanchard ...Two miles up the same road is the abandoned Knapp Ranch. A Mr. Kelly who operated a gas station and restaurant on the nearby Old Ridge Route, in operation from 1915 to 1933, originally built the ranch, consisting of several houses. In 1962, a wealthy businessman named Frank Knapp acquired the property and operated it for many years as a hunting lodge and horse ranch. After his death in 1988, it was acquired by the Forest Service in 1995 in a land exchange. One remaining wild stallion still roams there, which is confirmed by the abundance of horse droppings. The road is gated shortly above and below the ranch. ...[Note added by webmaster in September 2009: Kathryn Hill comments on the above paragraph, "I've never heard Uncle Frank being referred to as a wealthy businessman." Great-Grandpa and Grandma emigrated from Austria, and they didn't have a lot of money when he showed up. Also, I have never heard of Uncle Frank using (the ranch) for anything other than as his primary residence. I know he moved up there after his pet buffalo got out in Canoga Park." ...link to Knapp home, 1912] ...One of the tenants at the Knapp Ranch was an enigmatic mining promoter by the name of Annie Rose Briggs, who was active during the violent days of the Gillette Mine. She supposedly raised substantial sums of money by selling mining leases with stories of lost mines and buried treasure. [http://angeles.sierraclub.org/hps/archives/hps01472.htm] Samuel McCullough's Grave / Knapp Ranch - rj_berge 2008-10-15 Hey everyone, I am new to this community but I have some great finds to share. To start things off there is a great old grave west of Bakersfield near the small oil town of McKittrick. The grave is located on a small hill just off the south side of Highway 58 about 4 miles west of the intersection with Highway 33. It has been there since 1903 and is pretty well taken care of. It is a large headstone with a wrought iron fence around it. There is nothing out there and it is pretty desolate. My userpic was taken at the grave. Second is the abandoned Knapp Ranch in the Angeles National Forest just below Atmore Meadows Campground and about a mile and a half above Fish Canyon. When Frank Knapp, the last owner of the 320 acres that made up the ranch, died in 1988, his remaining family did not want the property so it went to a conservancy group that included Rosey Greer. Greer owns a ranch near Hughes Lake (Castaic) and was interested in 100 or so acres that abutted his property and was owned by the Forest Service. The ranch was an island of private property in the middle of the National Forest so the Forest Service agreed to the trade. The only way to the ranch is in a pickup or high clearance vehicle by a 4 mile dirt road (alternately referred to as Knapp Ranch Road and Telegraph Road) that takes off from the Old Ridge Route. The road is accessed by a paved road that leads to Sawmill Campground, just look for Forest Service Road 7N22. You have to park at the gate to the ranch and walk the last quarter mile as the FS has placed a locked gate there. There are three houses and some outbuildings still standing. One house is from around 1900 and is starting to fall down. The other two were built around 1955, one being a bunkhouse with a large porch and the other a two bedroom house with a flagstone fireplace. The two newer buildings are in surprisingly good shape as very few people venture this far in to the canyons and those that do are hunters and hikers, not vandals. There is a lot of lore surrounding the area including lost Spanish Gold, ghosts, Indian burial grounds, gold mines and an old woman names Ridge Route Annie. King Gillette, of razor fame, once dug up a burial ground with a bulldozer back in the 30's looking for the lost gold and the mine on the other side of the hill from the ranch is named for him. And if anyone has been to the baseball diamonds at Knapp Ranch Park over in the Northridge / Granada Hills area, it is interesting to note the park was named after the same Frank Knapp that owned the ranch. [http://social-abandoned.livejournal.com/42753.html]


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