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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Margaret GRAY: Birth: 23 Dec 1837 in , , , Ireland. Death: 19 Feb 1913 in Miles, Jackson Co., Iowa, USA

  2. Mary Jane GRAY: Birth: Jan 1841 in , , , Ireland. Death: Aft 1900

  3. Thomas GRAY: Birth: Abt 1843 in , , Alabama, USA.

  4. David GRAY: Birth: Sep 1844 in , Clinton Co., Iowa, USA.

  5. Elizabeth Ann GRAY: Birth: 10 Feb 1847 in Lyons, Clinton Co., Iowa, USA. Death: 25 Mar 1892 in Miles (near), Jackson Co., Iowa, USA

  6. James A. GRAY: Birth: 13 Mar 1852 in Lyons, Clinton Co., Iowa, USA. Death: Abt 1914


Sources
1. Title:   Elizabeth (Gray) Koch obituary
Page:   excerpt
Publication:   As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. http://iagenweb.org/boards/jackson/obituaries/index.cgi?review=30300
Text:   �Cb�Dx Elizabeth "Lizzie" Gray KOCH 1847-1892�C/b�D �Cb�D KOCH, GRAY, GREEN�C/b�D �Cb�DPosted By: Marsha B. Crawford <�Cu�[email protected] <mailto:[email protected]?subject=Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Gray KOCH, 1847-1892>�C/u�D> Date: 5/30/2003 at 03:04:35 �C/b�D Gone Home. Although it was generally known throughout the community that Mrs. Will Koch's health was failing, still the announcement made in Miles last week Friday afternoon that she was dying brought a shock of sadness, and deep anguish was depicted on the countenances of many who knew her well and loved her tenderly; and the whisper "It cannot be" came from white lips. Intense anxiety was felt until the still sadder news came, when sorrow and regret took the place of anxious fears. Mrs. Koch had suffered from a complication of diseases for several years and during the past year she was treated by an eminent physician in Davenport and everything that human skill could devise was done to restore the useful woman, fond mother and devoted wife to health. About ten days previous to her death she visited friends in Miles and many thought that with the opening of spring she would be better. On her last day with the family she walked about the house, ate and relished her dinner. Soon after dinner her eyes involuntarily closed and she commenced sinking. Husband and friends were summoned but she could not talk to them nor see them, still she evinced consciousness by her desire to hold the hand of her husband and realize that he was near her. When her dear children left her in the morning to go to school they little thought that when they returned mother could no more greet them with her sweet smile and happy words of encouragement. If tears and lamentations could have kept her spirit from soaring through the azure blue Heaven's rejoicing over another purified spirit would have been deferred, and mother's face would have again beamed with delight in the happy home circle; but God's will is supreme and he had ordered the spirit to come and at ten o'clock of the evening of Friday his angel bore it away to the realms of bliss eternal. The following is Mrs. Koch's history in brief, written by Hon. Geo. F. Green, a gentleman well acquainted with the family and greatly interested in their welfare: "Mrs. Lizzie Koch was born Feb. 10, 1847, at Lyons, Iowa. She was the daughter of William and Lizzie Gray, who died at Teeds Grove, the first on Feb. 2nd and the latter on Feb. 9th, 1855, leaving six children ranging in ages from three years to 17. After the death of the parents I was appointed administrator of the estate and guardian of the children. The deceased resided the first 4�a years with a family in Lyons. At that time it seemed best to give her a home where better advantages could be afforded her. I brought her to my home to wait the choosing of a new home. In a short time Mrs. Green became so attached to her that she must stay with us, which she did until she married. We gave her a thorough education. She graduated at the Lyons Female Seminary while it was a protestant school. "She was a member of the Congregational church and a true christian woman. It was her intention to unite with the M.E. church to be with her children who had recently joined that church. She leaves five children, one girl and four boys, George G., Rettie, Frank, Albert and Marshal. She died at her home near Miles, March 25, 1892." GEO. F. GREEN Mr. and Mrs. Green like other relatives, were deeply affected by this sudden death. They knew their Lizzie's good qualities. They had seen her beautiful natural traits develop into a grand character. The child they took at seven years and so much loved became a noble woman, deserving their highest esteem and holding their affections to the last. Mrs. Koch was respected by a large circle of friends and tenderly loved by those who knew her well. Carefully reared and well educated she was fitted for the duties of life which she has so faithfully performed. In her home her excellent traits shone with the most brilliancy. For 22 years she has brightened the life of her husband and cared for his aged mother as only a true christian woman could. Her children have cause to bless her memory. When such a priceless jewel is removed from the home there is cause for sorrow which only time can heal. Aching hearts will sigh for her. In the long, lonely hours the wifeless husband and motherless children will involuntarily listen for her sweet voice and home will seem so desolate because they hear it not. But while they mourn their loss in a home made so sadly dreary their loved one is "Gracing the courts above As essence divine supernal With eagerness, aye, eternal An answering charm above." The funeral was attended on Monday. The remains were followed to the M.E. Church by a long line of teams, some 30 in number. An unusually large number of neighbors and friends gathered to pay their tribute of respect to the departed and the large circle of mourning friends. The services were reverently conducted. The sweet, solemn singing by the choir and the appropriate words of scripture and impressive prayer by Rev. Burnard, the discourse by Rev. Bacon and the tender remarks by Rev. Kimball were in harmony with the sad event. Many eyes were filled with tears shed in sympathy with the sobs of the afflicted family. The sacred remains were encased in an elegant gray plush embossed casket, upon which rested the lovely floral offerings, consisting of wreaths and circles of natural flowers, and a large, loose bouquet of calla lilies and easter lilies with their long stems and pretty leaves and buds, filling the church with their fragrance as the sweet influence of the life gone out has filled the home and the community. At a few minutes past one the casket was lowered into the resting place in Miles cemetery, which loving hands had made beautiful with a white lining bordered with small bouquets of flowers and green leaves. The covering for the casket was handsomely decorated with flowers, green foliage and clusters of ribbon. Everything that skillful hands could do, was done to rob the last scene of its terrible gloom and sadness. The afflicted family and relatives have the sympathy of the entire community in which they have one and all been held in highest esteem. As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. __________ A Card. We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and sincere regards to the kind and willing neighbors and friends for their assistance and sympathy in the time of our deepest sorrow and saddest bereavement. We also desire to thank the M.E. choir and the ladies who attended to the floral tributes and to the beautifying of the grave. WM. KOCH AND FAMILY As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. Mrs. Lehman and daughter, of Lyons, Mrs. Coe of Manning, R.W. Chambers and wife of Marion, and John Koch and wife of Marion, were in Miles the first of the week to attend the funeral of Mrs. Lizzie Koch. Mesdames Lehman and Coe are sisters of the deceased. As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the end of March or the beginning of April 1892.
2. Title:   Biography of James A. Gray 1879
Page:   excerpts
Publication:   1879 History of Jackson County Iowa, pg. 706
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY, farmer, Sec. 32; P.0. Miles; born in Lyons, Clinton Co., in 1852; his parents died when he was about 3 years of age; he was brought up by George F. Green, in whose family he lived till he was married in 1876; his wife was Miss Kate Davis, of Iowa Township. Mr. Gray has 200 acres of land; is engaged in general farming and stock-raising.
3. Title:   James A. Gray biography 1889
Page:   excerpt
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY b. 13 Mar 1852 Related Surnames - GRAY, GREENE, DAVIS James A. Gray, who is still on the sunny side of forty, is numbered among the enterprising and prosperous farmers of Iowa Township, where he owns land to the extent of 200 acres on section 32. He has been uniformly successful in his farming and business interests, and makes a specialty of stock-raising, his favorites being full-blooded Short-horn cattle and Poland-China swine. He has followed agriculture since boyhood, is a man universally respected among his neighbors, and in his township is quite prominent in public affairs, having officiated as Trustee and Assessor several years, and still occupies the latter named office. Mr. Gray was born in Lyons, Clinton County, this State, March 13, 1852, and was orphaned when but three years old by the death of both his parents who passed away within a week of each other. The father, it is supposed, was a native of Alabama, whence he removed some time in the forties to Iowa. He was by a trade a millwright and carpenter, and died while superintending the erection of the Leeds Grove Mills. After the death of his parents our subject was taken into the family of Hon. G.F. Greene, of Miles, with whom he lived until twenty-four years of age, receiving an excellent education, and being graduated from the Lyons High School in June, 1869. He was married less than seven years later, Jan. 2, 1876, to Miss Kate, daughter of William and Mary Davis. Mrs. Gray was born in Hamilton, Canada, Dec. 22, 1855, and was brought by her parents to this county when but six months old. The mother of Mrs. Gray resides with her. The father is deceased. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, a son, died in infancy. Our subject, politically, supports the principles of the Democratic party. Mrs. Gray is a member in good standing of the Congregational Church at Miles. They have a pleasant home with the prospect of a bright and prosperous future. The residence is especially fine, while the barn and other outbuildings are in keeping with the ideas of the modern agriculturist. Mr. Gray avails himself of the latest improved methods and first-class machinery in the prosecution of agriculture, and realizes a handsome income. ("Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa", originally published in 1889, by the Chapman Brothers, of Chicago, Illinois.)
4. Title:   Elizabeth (Gray) Koch obituary
Page:   William Gray
Publication:   As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. http://iagenweb.org/boards/jackson/obituaries/index.cgi?review=30300
Text:   �Cb�Dx Elizabeth "Lizzie" Gray KOCH 1847-1892�C/b�D �Cb�D KOCH, GRAY, GREEN�C/b�D �Cb�DPosted By: Marsha B. Crawford <�Cu�[email protected] <mailto:[email protected]?subject=Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Gray KOCH, 1847-1892>�C/u�D> Date: 5/30/2003 at 03:04:35 �C/b�D Gone Home. Although it was generally known throughout the community that Mrs. Will Koch's health was failing, still the announcement made in Miles last week Friday afternoon that she was dying brought a shock of sadness, and deep anguish was depicted on the countenances of many who knew her well and loved her tenderly; and the whisper "It cannot be" came from white lips. Intense anxiety was felt until the still sadder news came, when sorrow and regret took the place of anxious fears. Mrs. Koch had suffered from a complication of diseases for several years and during the past year she was treated by an eminent physician in Davenport and everything that human skill could devise was done to restore the useful woman, fond mother and devoted wife to health. About ten days previous to her death she visited friends in Miles and many thought that with the opening of spring she would be better. On her last day with the family she walked about the house, ate and relished her dinner. Soon after dinner her eyes involuntarily closed and she commenced sinking. Husband and friends were summoned but she could not talk to them nor see them, still she evinced consciousness by her desire to hold the hand of her husband and realize that he was near her. When her dear children left her in the morning to go to school they little thought that when they returned mother could no more greet them with her sweet smile and happy words of encouragement. If tears and lamentations could have kept her spirit from soaring through the azure blue Heaven's rejoicing over another purified spirit would have been deferred, and mother's face would have again beamed with delight in the happy home circle; but God's will is supreme and he had ordered the spirit to come and at ten o'clock of the evening of Friday his angel bore it away to the realms of bliss eternal. The following is Mrs. Koch's history in brief, written by Hon. Geo. F. Green, a gentleman well acquainted with the family and greatly interested in their welfare: "Mrs. Lizzie Koch was born Feb. 10, 1847, at Lyons, Iowa. She was the daughter of William and Lizzie Gray, who died at Teeds Grove, the first on Feb. 2nd and the latter on Feb. 9th, 1855, leaving six children ranging in ages from three years to 17. After the death of the parents I was appointed administrator of the estate and guardian of the children. The deceased resided the first 4�a years with a family in Lyons. At that time it seemed best to give her a home where better advantages could be afforded her. I brought her to my home to wait the choosing of a new home. In a short time Mrs. Green became so attached to her that she must stay with us, which she did until she married. We gave her a thorough education. She graduated at the Lyons Female Seminary while it was a protestant school. "She was a member of the Congregational church and a true christian woman. It was her intention to unite with the M.E. church to be with her children who had recently joined that church. She leaves five children, one girl and four boys, George G., Rettie, Frank, Albert and Marshal. She died at her home near Miles, March 25, 1892." GEO. F. GREEN Mr. and Mrs. Green like other relatives, were deeply affected by this sudden death. They knew their Lizzie's good qualities. They had seen her beautiful natural traits develop into a grand character. The child they took at seven years and so much loved became a noble woman, deserving their highest esteem and holding their affections to the last. Mrs. Koch was respected by a large circle of friends and tenderly loved by those who knew her well. Carefully reared and well educated she was fitted for the duties of life which she has so faithfully performed. In her home her excellent traits shone with the most brilliancy. For 22 years she has brightened the life of her husband and cared for his aged mother as only a true christian woman could. Her children have cause to bless her memory. When such a priceless jewel is removed from the home there is cause for sorrow which only time can heal. Aching hearts will sigh for her. In the long, lonely hours the wifeless husband and motherless children will involuntarily listen for her sweet voice and home will seem so desolate because they hear it not. But while they mourn their loss in a home made so sadly dreary their loved one is "Gracing the courts above As essence divine supernal With eagerness, aye, eternal An answering charm above." The funeral was attended on Monday. The remains were followed to the M.E. Church by a long line of teams, some 30 in number. An unusually large number of neighbors and friends gathered to pay their tribute of respect to the departed and the large circle of mourning friends. The services were reverently conducted. The sweet, solemn singing by the choir and the appropriate words of scripture and impressive prayer by Rev. Burnard, the discourse by Rev. Bacon and the tender remarks by Rev. Kimball were in harmony with the sad event. Many eyes were filled with tears shed in sympathy with the sobs of the afflicted family. The sacred remains were encased in an elegant gray plush embossed casket, upon which rested the lovely floral offerings, consisting of wreaths and circles of natural flowers, and a large, loose bouquet of calla lilies and easter lilies with their long stems and pretty leaves and buds, filling the church with their fragrance as the sweet influence of the life gone out has filled the home and the community. At a few minutes past one the casket was lowered into the resting place in Miles cemetery, which loving hands had made beautiful with a white lining bordered with small bouquets of flowers and green leaves. The covering for the casket was handsomely decorated with flowers, green foliage and clusters of ribbon. Everything that skillful hands could do, was done to rob the last scene of its terrible gloom and sadness. The afflicted family and relatives have the sympathy of the entire community in which they have one and all been held in highest esteem. As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. __________ A Card. We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and sincere regards to the kind and willing neighbors and friends for their assistance and sympathy in the time of our deepest sorrow and saddest bereavement. We also desire to thank the M.E. choir and the ladies who attended to the floral tributes and to the beautifying of the grave. WM. KOCH AND FAMILY As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. Mrs. Lehman and daughter, of Lyons, Mrs. Coe of Manning, R.W. Chambers and wife of Marion, and John Koch and wife of Marion, were in Miles the first of the week to attend the funeral of Mrs. Lizzie Koch. Mesdames Lehman and Coe are sisters of the deceased. As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the end of March or the beginning of April 1892.
5. Title:   2009 Biography of William Gray
Page:   William Gray
Author:   LuAnn Goeke
Text:   �Cb�Dx Biography of William & Elizabeth Gray of Ireland, Alabama and Iowa �C/b�D William and Elizabeth Gray were born and married in Ireland where their oldest children, Margaret and Mary Jane, were born, the last being born in January of 1841. Soon after that, the young family immigrated to the United States. In about 1843, their next child, Thomas, was born in Alabama. Within a year or two, the family had moved again, this time to Clinton Co., Iowa where two more children were born. William appears to have been a carpenter and joiner, as well as a millwright. Shortly after the move to Iowa, in about 1844, William bought out two of the three partners in an Elk River Twp. hemp-mill that was being converted into a grist-mill. Two years later, in the spring of 1846, he went into the flouring-mill business with Wm. "Billy" G. Haun at a place soon known as Hauntown. This flouring-mill enterprise quickly grew to include a whiskey distillery, a malt-house, a store and a warehouse, and by November of 1846, both the mill and distillery were in full operation. The capacity of the distillery was nine barrels per day. Its product was mostly sold in the pineries [lumber camps], and as the reputation of Elk River whisky was not yet fully established, it was customary to brand the barrels "Old Rectified Whisky, from B.J. Moore & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio." From this date until 1857, Hauntown was one of the most important business points in this section of the country, and Billy G. Haun was considered to be one of the financial "heavy dogs." Sometime between 1847 and 1854, William sold out his interest to Haun and moved to nearby Teed's Grove to build a new flouring-mill, which was still in operation in 1879. But the Gray family was struck by tragedy during the mill's construction. William, then about 38 years old, died on February 2�Csup�Dnd�C/sup�D, 1855, from unknown causes, while "superintending the erection of the Teed's Grove Mill." He may well have died from a disease because his wife, Elizabeth, died within a week of her husband, on the 9�Csup�Dth�C/sup�D of February, 1855. Both were buried in the Teed's Grove Cemetery. Their deaths left six orphaned children ranging in age from three years to seventeen. They were: Margaret Gray, age 17, b.Ireland. Mary Jane Gray, age 14, b.Ireland. Thomas Gray, age 12, b.Alabama. David Gray, age 11, b.Iowa. Elizabeth A. Gray, age 8, b.Iowa. James A. Gray, age 3, b.Iowa. Hon. George F. Green of Iowa Twp., Jackson Co., Iowa, was appointed administrator of the estate and guardian of the children. A year after the parents' deaths, in the Iowa Census of 1856, these children were scattered among several households in both Clinton and Jackson Counties. �Cb�DMargaret Gray �C/b�Dmarried Adam Lehman of Lyons, Clinton Co., Iowa where both lived out their lives. �Cb�DMary Jane Gray�C/b�D married George W. Coe from Jackson Co. and they later moved to Carroll Co., Iowa. �Cb�DThomas Gray�C/b�D, enlisted in the Army at age 18 and served in the Civil War. He survived the war and may have moved to Cass Co., Nebraska, then to Klickitat Co., Washington State. �Cb�DDavid Gray�C/b�D, also enlisted in the Army at age 18 and served in the Civil War. He married a Jackson Co.-born woman named Harriet, and they eventually moved to Woodbury Co., Iowa and were there until at least the 1900 census. �Cb�DElizabeth A. Gray�C/b�D, after a few years,�Cb�D �C/b�Dwas adopted by her guardian, George Green, and his wife. In 1870, she married William H. Koch of the same area and they lived there the rest of their lives. �Cb�DJames A. Gray�C/b�D, was also raised by his guardian, George Green. In 1876, he married a neighbor girl named Kate Davis, and they lived in the same neighborhood until Kate's death in 1895. By 1900, James is listed in Des Moines, Polk Co., Iowa and has a new wife, Estelle (Smith) Davis. James died there in the winter of 1914-1915. Estelle then moved back to Miles, Jackson Co., Iowa. �Ctab�DAs I followed the children through the census records, it became clear that many of the children either never knew or didn't remember that they or their parents had been born in Ireland. What they all seemed to remember was Alabama, and that showed up in nearly all of the census records.
6. Title:   Biography of James A. Gray 1879
Page:   [male] Gray
Publication:   1879 History of Jackson County Iowa, pg. 706
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY, farmer, Sec. 32; P.0. Miles; born in Lyons, Clinton Co., in 1852; his parents died when he was about 3 years of age; he was brought up by George F. Green, in whose family he lived till he was married in 1876; his wife was Miss Kate Davis, of Iowa Township. Mr. Gray has 200 acres of land; is engaged in general farming and stock-raising.
7. Title:   James A. Gray biography 1889
Page:   [name not given]
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY b. 13 Mar 1852 Related Surnames - GRAY, GREENE, DAVIS James A. Gray, who is still on the sunny side of forty, is numbered among the enterprising and prosperous farmers of Iowa Township, where he owns land to the extent of 200 acres on section 32. He has been uniformly successful in his farming and business interests, and makes a specialty of stock-raising, his favorites being full-blooded Short-horn cattle and Poland-China swine. He has followed agriculture since boyhood, is a man universally respected among his neighbors, and in his township is quite prominent in public affairs, having officiated as Trustee and Assessor several years, and still occupies the latter named office. Mr. Gray was born in Lyons, Clinton County, this State, March 13, 1852, and was orphaned when but three years old by the death of both his parents who passed away within a week of each other. The father, it is supposed, was a native of Alabama, whence he removed some time in the forties to Iowa. He was by a trade a millwright and carpenter, and died while superintending the erection of the Leeds Grove Mills. After the death of his parents our subject was taken into the family of Hon. G.F. Greene, of Miles, with whom he lived until twenty-four years of age, receiving an excellent education, and being graduated from the Lyons High School in June, 1869. He was married less than seven years later, Jan. 2, 1876, to Miss Kate, daughter of William and Mary Davis. Mrs. Gray was born in Hamilton, Canada, Dec. 22, 1855, and was brought by her parents to this county when but six months old. The mother of Mrs. Gray resides with her. The father is deceased. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, a son, died in infancy. Our subject, politically, supports the principles of the Democratic party. Mrs. Gray is a member in good standing of the Congregational Church at Miles. They have a pleasant home with the prospect of a bright and prosperous future. The residence is especially fine, while the barn and other outbuildings are in keeping with the ideas of the modern agriculturist. Mr. Gray avails himself of the latest improved methods and first-class machinery in the prosecution of agriculture, and realizes a handsome income. ("Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa", originally published in 1889, by the Chapman Brothers, of Chicago, Illinois.)
8. Title:   Excerpt re: Early Mills in Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   William Gray
Publication:   The History of Clinton Co., Iowa by Western Historical Co. 1879 Pg 619-620
Text:   "In 1837, O.A. Crary and James Leonard built a sawmill on Elk River, on Section 11, Township 83 north, Range 6 east. It was operated as a sawmill from that date until 1842, and did a large amount of business until the supply of timber was diminished. It was then taken down and removed to a stream in Jackson County near Green Island. "The next attempt at mill-building was in 1843, when John Sloan, William Sloan, George Griswold and M.L. Barber began the erection of a mill for the manufacture of hemp, at the place where Hauntown now is. Hemp-seed was purchased for sowing at $2 per bushel and large quantities of it raised for the purpose of being converted here into rope, twine, bagging, etc. Like many other visionary schemes, it was found to be impracticable, owing to the immense amount of labor required in the process. After this result, the manufacture of these goods was abandoned and the mill was to be converted into a gristmill. The Messrs. Sloan and Griswold sold out their interest to William Gray, Mr. Barber, who was a millwright, retaining his. In the winter of 1845-46, Mr. Gray went to St. Louis, where he fell in with William G. Haun, and, in the spring of 1846, they returned, bringing with them all the necessary machinery for a flouring-mill. This enterprise was pushed rapidly to completion, a distillery being also immediately built, together with a store, malt-house and warehouse, and in November the mill and distillery were in full operation. The capacity of the distillery was nine barrels per day. Its product was mostly sold in the pineries, and as the reputation of Elk River whisky was not yet fully established, it was customary to brand the barrels "Old Rectified Whisky, from B.J. Moore & Co., Cincinnati. Ohio." From this date until 1857, Hauntown was one of the most important business points in this section of the country, and ''Billy G. Haun" considered to be one of the financial "heavy dogs." Mr. Haun also built a steam sawmill at the mouth of Elk River. In 1859, his creditors had dispossessed him of his Hauntown property, and he went down midway between there and the Mississippi, to which point he removed his steam sawmill and converted it into a distillery. Both these have long since gone to decay. The grist-mill at Hauntown, now owned by Wood & Struve, has been from time to time repaired and improved, and is now in successful operation. "Mr. Gray, before mentioned, sold out his interest to W.G. Haun and went to Teed's Grove and built a new flouring-mill, which is the one now in operation there. "In 1841, Messrs. Calderwood & Dinwiddie commenced the erection of a sawmill on the Elk River, on Section 18, Township 83 north. Range 7 east. After two failures, resulting from the imperfection of the waterwheels, Mr. Dinwiddie withdrew from the firm. Mr. Calderwood, however, succeeded, late in the fall of 1842, in completing a mill that was of ample capacity for the wants of the locality. The supply of timber being good - plenty of' Government land - lumber was shipped to Galena and various other points, for wagon- building, etc., until 1850, when Mr. Calderwood went to California, selling the mill shortly after to Mr. C.E. Langford, who operated it for several years, and there laid the foundation for the present extensive and first-class steam saw-mill owned by himself and Mr. Hall, in Fulton, Ill. The Calderwood mill is now owned by Mr. Daniel Favorgue, but the supply of timber having given out, little or nothing is done in the way of manufacturing lumber. A grist-mill, however, built by Mr. Favorgue, is in successful operation."
9. Title:   Excerpt re: Hauntown, Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   William Gray
Publication:   Wolfe's history of Clinton County, Iowa By Patrick B. Wolfe Published by B. F. Bowen, 1911 Item notes: v. 1 Original from the New York Public Library Digitized Jan 24, 2008 1149 pages Pg 250-251
Text:   x HAUNTOWN. The town in Elk River township of most historic interest is Hauntown, one of the oldest settlements in the county. Here John and William Sloan, George Griswold and M.L. Barber began the erection of a mill for the manufacture of hemp in 1843. A large quantity of hemp was raised in the township that year, but it was found that an impracticable amount of labor was required in the manufacture, so the plan for the hemp factory fell through with. William Gray bought out three of the partners and, with Mr. Barber, decided to convert the mill into a grist-mill. In 1846 they interested William G. Haun, destined to become a figure of much local prominence, and that year established a flouring mill. A distillery and store were built at the same time. The distillery had a capacity of nine barrels a day, and sold its product mostly in the pineries, branding the whisky as "Old Rectified Whisky, from B.J. Moore & Co., Cincinnati, Ohio." From the establishment of the mill and distillery until 1857, Hauntown was one of the most important business points in this section of the country, and "Billy" G. Haun won quite a reputation as a financier. He later built a steam sawmill at the mouth of Elk river. By 1859 his creditors had dispossessed him of his Hauntown property, and he moved the sawmill from the first location and converted it into a distillery. The mill at Hauntown has been in operation since, with different owners, and having undergone many repairs. At present William Struve operates it as a grist, flour and saw mill. John Nelson keeps a general store at Hauntown. This was in early days one of the important postoffices of the county, the mail being carried on horseback from Lyons, and has since been an active center, the dance-hall there being the scene of much gayety. But the coming of the railroads robbed Hauntown of its early prospects.
10. Title:   1850 Federal Census Images for Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa census
Page:   Wm. Gray
Publication:   Taken 28 Sept 1850.
11. Title:   1847 State Census Images for Lyons Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Wm. Gray
12. Title:   1849 State Census Images for Lyons Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Wm. Gray
13. Title:   Teeds Grove Cemetery Listing, Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   William Gray
Publication:   http://iagenweb.org/clinton/records/cemeteries/teeds-grove.html
14. Title:   Iowa GenWeb Gravestone Photo Project
Page:   William H. Gray, Husband
Publication:   http://iowagravestones.org/index.php/cid_49/
Text:   �Cu�DSt. Peter's Cemetery <cemetery_list.php?CID=49&cName=St.+Peter%27s>�C/u�D Jackson County, Iowa �Cb�DMartin Haley�C/b�D h/o Lydia b. December 27, 1840 d. May 27, 1918 �Cb�DLydia Anne Haley�C/b�D d/o Abraham & Mary Dobson wife of Martin Haley Sr b. March 13, 1854 d. January 8, 1923
15. Title:   1850 Federal Census Images for Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa census
Page:   abt 1817, IRE
Publication:   Taken 28 Sept 1850.
16. Title:   Iowa GenWeb Gravestone Photo Project
Page:   1817
Publication:   http://iowagravestones.org/index.php/cid_49/
Text:   �Cu�DSt. Peter's Cemetery <cemetery_list.php?CID=49&cName=St.+Peter%27s>�C/u�D Jackson County, Iowa �Cb�DMartin Haley�C/b�D h/o Lydia b. December 27, 1840 d. May 27, 1918 �Cb�DLydia Anne Haley�C/b�D d/o Abraham & Mary Dobson wife of Martin Haley Sr b. March 13, 1854 d. January 8, 1923
17. Title:   James A. Gray biography 1889
Page:   supposedly Alabama
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY b. 13 Mar 1852 Related Surnames - GRAY, GREENE, DAVIS James A. Gray, who is still on the sunny side of forty, is numbered among the enterprising and prosperous farmers of Iowa Township, where he owns land to the extent of 200 acres on section 32. He has been uniformly successful in his farming and business interests, and makes a specialty of stock-raising, his favorites being full-blooded Short-horn cattle and Poland-China swine. He has followed agriculture since boyhood, is a man universally respected among his neighbors, and in his township is quite prominent in public affairs, having officiated as Trustee and Assessor several years, and still occupies the latter named office. Mr. Gray was born in Lyons, Clinton County, this State, March 13, 1852, and was orphaned when but three years old by the death of both his parents who passed away within a week of each other. The father, it is supposed, was a native of Alabama, whence he removed some time in the forties to Iowa. He was by a trade a millwright and carpenter, and died while superintending the erection of the Leeds Grove Mills. After the death of his parents our subject was taken into the family of Hon. G.F. Greene, of Miles, with whom he lived until twenty-four years of age, receiving an excellent education, and being graduated from the Lyons High School in June, 1869. He was married less than seven years later, Jan. 2, 1876, to Miss Kate, daughter of William and Mary Davis. Mrs. Gray was born in Hamilton, Canada, Dec. 22, 1855, and was brought by her parents to this county when but six months old. The mother of Mrs. Gray resides with her. The father is deceased. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, a son, died in infancy. Our subject, politically, supports the principles of the Democratic party. Mrs. Gray is a member in good standing of the Congregational Church at Miles. They have a pleasant home with the prospect of a bright and prosperous future. The residence is especially fine, while the barn and other outbuildings are in keeping with the ideas of the modern agriculturist. Mr. Gray avails himself of the latest improved methods and first-class machinery in the prosecution of agriculture, and realizes a handsome income. ("Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa", originally published in 1889, by the Chapman Brothers, of Chicago, Illinois.)
18. Title:   Elizabeth (Gray) Koch obituary
Page:   2 Feb 1855, Teeds Grove, [Clinton Co., IA]
Publication:   As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. http://iagenweb.org/boards/jackson/obituaries/index.cgi?review=30300
Text:   �Cb�Dx Elizabeth "Lizzie" Gray KOCH 1847-1892�C/b�D �Cb�D KOCH, GRAY, GREEN�C/b�D �Cb�DPosted By: Marsha B. Crawford <�Cu�[email protected] <mailto:[email protected]?subject=Elizabeth 'Lizzie' Gray KOCH, 1847-1892>�C/u�D> Date: 5/30/2003 at 03:04:35 �C/b�D Gone Home. Although it was generally known throughout the community that Mrs. Will Koch's health was failing, still the announcement made in Miles last week Friday afternoon that she was dying brought a shock of sadness, and deep anguish was depicted on the countenances of many who knew her well and loved her tenderly; and the whisper "It cannot be" came from white lips. Intense anxiety was felt until the still sadder news came, when sorrow and regret took the place of anxious fears. Mrs. Koch had suffered from a complication of diseases for several years and during the past year she was treated by an eminent physician in Davenport and everything that human skill could devise was done to restore the useful woman, fond mother and devoted wife to health. About ten days previous to her death she visited friends in Miles and many thought that with the opening of spring she would be better. On her last day with the family she walked about the house, ate and relished her dinner. Soon after dinner her eyes involuntarily closed and she commenced sinking. Husband and friends were summoned but she could not talk to them nor see them, still she evinced consciousness by her desire to hold the hand of her husband and realize that he was near her. When her dear children left her in the morning to go to school they little thought that when they returned mother could no more greet them with her sweet smile and happy words of encouragement. If tears and lamentations could have kept her spirit from soaring through the azure blue Heaven's rejoicing over another purified spirit would have been deferred, and mother's face would have again beamed with delight in the happy home circle; but God's will is supreme and he had ordered the spirit to come and at ten o'clock of the evening of Friday his angel bore it away to the realms of bliss eternal. The following is Mrs. Koch's history in brief, written by Hon. Geo. F. Green, a gentleman well acquainted with the family and greatly interested in their welfare: "Mrs. Lizzie Koch was born Feb. 10, 1847, at Lyons, Iowa. She was the daughter of William and Lizzie Gray, who died at Teeds Grove, the first on Feb. 2nd and the latter on Feb. 9th, 1855, leaving six children ranging in ages from three years to 17. After the death of the parents I was appointed administrator of the estate and guardian of the children. The deceased resided the first 4�a years with a family in Lyons. At that time it seemed best to give her a home where better advantages could be afforded her. I brought her to my home to wait the choosing of a new home. In a short time Mrs. Green became so attached to her that she must stay with us, which she did until she married. We gave her a thorough education. She graduated at the Lyons Female Seminary while it was a protestant school. "She was a member of the Congregational church and a true christian woman. It was her intention to unite with the M.E. church to be with her children who had recently joined that church. She leaves five children, one girl and four boys, George G., Rettie, Frank, Albert and Marshal. She died at her home near Miles, March 25, 1892." GEO. F. GREEN Mr. and Mrs. Green like other relatives, were deeply affected by this sudden death. They knew their Lizzie's good qualities. They had seen her beautiful natural traits develop into a grand character. The child they took at seven years and so much loved became a noble woman, deserving their highest esteem and holding their affections to the last. Mrs. Koch was respected by a large circle of friends and tenderly loved by those who knew her well. Carefully reared and well educated she was fitted for the duties of life which she has so faithfully performed. In her home her excellent traits shone with the most brilliancy. For 22 years she has brightened the life of her husband and cared for his aged mother as only a true christian woman could. Her children have cause to bless her memory. When such a priceless jewel is removed from the home there is cause for sorrow which only time can heal. Aching hearts will sigh for her. In the long, lonely hours the wifeless husband and motherless children will involuntarily listen for her sweet voice and home will seem so desolate because they hear it not. But while they mourn their loss in a home made so sadly dreary their loved one is "Gracing the courts above As essence divine supernal With eagerness, aye, eternal An answering charm above." The funeral was attended on Monday. The remains were followed to the M.E. Church by a long line of teams, some 30 in number. An unusually large number of neighbors and friends gathered to pay their tribute of respect to the departed and the large circle of mourning friends. The services were reverently conducted. The sweet, solemn singing by the choir and the appropriate words of scripture and impressive prayer by Rev. Burnard, the discourse by Rev. Bacon and the tender remarks by Rev. Kimball were in harmony with the sad event. Many eyes were filled with tears shed in sympathy with the sobs of the afflicted family. The sacred remains were encased in an elegant gray plush embossed casket, upon which rested the lovely floral offerings, consisting of wreaths and circles of natural flowers, and a large, loose bouquet of calla lilies and easter lilies with their long stems and pretty leaves and buds, filling the church with their fragrance as the sweet influence of the life gone out has filled the home and the community. At a few minutes past one the casket was lowered into the resting place in Miles cemetery, which loving hands had made beautiful with a white lining bordered with small bouquets of flowers and green leaves. The covering for the casket was handsomely decorated with flowers, green foliage and clusters of ribbon. Everything that skillful hands could do, was done to rob the last scene of its terrible gloom and sadness. The afflicted family and relatives have the sympathy of the entire community in which they have one and all been held in highest esteem. As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. __________ A Card. We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks and sincere regards to the kind and willing neighbors and friends for their assistance and sympathy in the time of our deepest sorrow and saddest bereavement. We also desire to thank the M.E. choir and the ladies who attended to the floral tributes and to the beautifying of the grave. WM. KOCH AND FAMILY As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the first of April 1892. Mrs. Lehman and daughter, of Lyons, Mrs. Coe of Manning, R.W. Chambers and wife of Marion, and John Koch and wife of Marion, were in Miles the first of the week to attend the funeral of Mrs. Lizzie Koch. Mesdames Lehman and Coe are sisters of the deceased. As published in a Jackson Co., Iowa, newspaper about the end of March or the beginning of April 1892.
19. Title:   Teeds Grove Cemetery Listing, Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   2 Mar 1855
Publication:   http://iagenweb.org/clinton/records/cemeteries/teeds-grove.html
20. Title:   Biography of James A. Gray 1879
Page:   abt 1855, Leeds Grove Mills, prob. Clinton Co., IA
Publication:   1879 History of Jackson County Iowa, pg. 706
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY, farmer, Sec. 32; P.0. Miles; born in Lyons, Clinton Co., in 1852; his parents died when he was about 3 years of age; he was brought up by George F. Green, in whose family he lived till he was married in 1876; his wife was Miss Kate Davis, of Iowa Township. Mr. Gray has 200 acres of land; is engaged in general farming and stock-raising.
21. Title:   Iowa GenWeb Gravestone Photo Project
Page:   1855
Publication:   http://iowagravestones.org/index.php/cid_49/
Text:   �Cu�DSt. Peter's Cemetery <cemetery_list.php?CID=49&cName=St.+Peter%27s>�C/u�D Jackson County, Iowa �Cb�DMartin Haley�C/b�D h/o Lydia b. December 27, 1840 d. May 27, 1918 �Cb�DLydia Anne Haley�C/b�D d/o Abraham & Mary Dobson wife of Martin Haley Sr b. March 13, 1854 d. January 8, 1923
22. Title:   James A. Gray biography 1889
Page:   abt 1855, when James was three
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY b. 13 Mar 1852 Related Surnames - GRAY, GREENE, DAVIS James A. Gray, who is still on the sunny side of forty, is numbered among the enterprising and prosperous farmers of Iowa Township, where he owns land to the extent of 200 acres on section 32. He has been uniformly successful in his farming and business interests, and makes a specialty of stock-raising, his favorites being full-blooded Short-horn cattle and Poland-China swine. He has followed agriculture since boyhood, is a man universally respected among his neighbors, and in his township is quite prominent in public affairs, having officiated as Trustee and Assessor several years, and still occupies the latter named office. Mr. Gray was born in Lyons, Clinton County, this State, March 13, 1852, and was orphaned when but three years old by the death of both his parents who passed away within a week of each other. The father, it is supposed, was a native of Alabama, whence he removed some time in the forties to Iowa. He was by a trade a millwright and carpenter, and died while superintending the erection of the Leeds Grove Mills. After the death of his parents our subject was taken into the family of Hon. G.F. Greene, of Miles, with whom he lived until twenty-four years of age, receiving an excellent education, and being graduated from the Lyons High School in June, 1869. He was married less than seven years later, Jan. 2, 1876, to Miss Kate, daughter of William and Mary Davis. Mrs. Gray was born in Hamilton, Canada, Dec. 22, 1855, and was brought by her parents to this county when but six months old. The mother of Mrs. Gray resides with her. The father is deceased. The only child of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, a son, died in infancy. Our subject, politically, supports the principles of the Democratic party. Mrs. Gray is a member in good standing of the Congregational Church at Miles. They have a pleasant home with the prospect of a bright and prosperous future. The residence is especially fine, while the barn and other outbuildings are in keeping with the ideas of the modern agriculturist. Mr. Gray avails himself of the latest improved methods and first-class machinery in the prosecution of agriculture, and realizes a handsome income. ("Portrait and Biographical Album of Jackson County, Iowa", originally published in 1889, by the Chapman Brothers, of Chicago, Illinois.)
23. Title:   Teeds Grove Cemetery Listing, Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Teeds Grove Cem., Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., IA
Publication:   http://iagenweb.org/clinton/records/cemeteries/teeds-grove.html
24. Title:   Iowa GenWeb Gravestone Photo Project
Page:   Teeds Grove Cem., Clinton Co., IA
Publication:   http://iowagravestones.org/index.php/cid_49/
Text:   �Cu�DSt. Peter's Cemetery <cemetery_list.php?CID=49&cName=St.+Peter%27s>�C/u�D Jackson County, Iowa �Cb�DMartin Haley�C/b�D h/o Lydia b. December 27, 1840 d. May 27, 1918 �Cb�DLydia Anne Haley�C/b�D d/o Abraham & Mary Dobson wife of Martin Haley Sr b. March 13, 1854 d. January 8, 1923
25. Title:   1847 State Census Images for Lyons Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Image 1 of 1, Col. 1, Ln: 36
26. Title:   1849 State Census Images for Lyons Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Image 8 of 7, Col. 3, Ln: 45
27. Title:   1850 Federal Census Images for Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa census
Page:   Pg [396/198], Dw: 232, Fam: 238
Publication:   Taken 28 Sept 1850.
28. Title:   1851 State Census Images for no twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Image 11 of 12, Col. 1, Ln: 23
29. Title:   1854 State Census Images for Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa
Page:   Image 3 of 5, Ln: 5
30. Title:   1850 Federal Census Images for Elk River Twp., Clinton Co., Iowa census
Page:   bef 1838, Ireland, birth of daughter, Margaret
Publication:   Taken 28 Sept 1850.
31. Title:   Biography of James A. Gray 1879
Page:   bef Mar 1852, birth of son, James
Publication:   1879 History of Jackson County Iowa, pg. 706
Text:   x JAMES A. GRAY, farmer, Sec. 32; P.0. Miles; born in Lyons, Clinton Co., in 1852; his parents died when he was about 3 years of age; he was brought up by George F. Green, in whose family he lived till he was married in 1876; his wife was Miss Kate Davis, of Iowa Township. Mr. Gray has 200 acres of land; is engaged in general farming and stock-raising.



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