Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William Plantagenet: Birth: 17 AUG 1152 in Normandy, England. Death: ABT APR 1156 in Wallingford, Castle, Berkshire, England

  2. William Prince of England: Birth: 17 AUG 1152 in ,Le Mans, Sarthe, France. Death: APR 1156 in Wallingford Cast, Wallingford, Berkshire, England

  3. Henry Plantagenet: Birth: 28 FEB 1154/55 in Bermondsey. Death: 11 JUN 1183 in Martel

  4. Henry Prince of England: Birth: 28 MAR 1155 in Bermandseypalace, London, Middlesex, England. Death: 11 JUN 1183 in Mortel Castle, Turenne, Correze, France

  5. Matilda Plantagenet: Birth: 1156 in London, England. Death: 28 JUN 1189 in Brunswick

  6. Matilda Princess of England: Birth: 1156 in ,,London, England. Death: 28 JUN 1189 in ,,Brunswick, Germany

  7. Richard I Plantagenet: Birth: 1157 in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England. Death: 6 APR 1199 in Chalus, Limousin

  8. Richard I "Coeur England: Birth: 13 SEP 1157 in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. Death: 6 APR 1199 in Chalus, Haute-Vienne, France

  9. Geoffrey Plantagenet: Birth: 23 SEP 1158. Death: 19 AUG 1186 in Paris

  10. Geoffrey Prince of England: Birth: 23 SEP 1158 in ,,,England. Death: 19 AUG 1186 in ,Paris, Seine, France

  11. Philip Prince of England: Birth: ABT 1160 in of, England. Death: ABT 1161 in Infant

  12. Eleanor Plantagenet: Birth: 11 OCT 1162 in Falais, Calvados, France or Domfront, Normandy. Death: 31 OCT 1214 in Burgos, Spain

  13. Eleanor Plantagenet: Birth: 13 OCT 1162 in Domfront, Normandy. Death: 31 OCT 1214 in Burgos

  14. Eleanor of England: Birth: 13 OCT 1162 in Falais, France. Death: 31 OCT 1214 in Burgos, Spain

  15. Joanna Princess of England: Birth: OCT 1164 in ,Angers, Maine-et-Loire, France. Death: 4 SEP 1199 in ,Rouen, Seine-Maritime, France

  16. Joan Plantagenet: Birth: OCT 1165 in Angers. Death: 4 SEP 1199

  17. Joanna Princess of England: Birth: OCT 1165 in Angers, Maine-Et-Loire, France. Death: 4 SEP 1199 in ROUEN, Seine-Maritime, France

  18. John "Lackland" King England: Birth: 24 DEC 1166 in Kings Manorhouse, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England. Death: 19 OCT 1216 in Newark, Nottinghamshire, England

  19. King John "Lackland" Plantagenet: Birth: 24 DEC 1167 in Beaumont Palace, Oxford, England. Death: 19 OCT 1216 in Newark Castle, Newark, Nottinghamshire, England


Family
Marriage:
Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William de Longespee: Birth: ABT 1183 in ,,,England. Death: 7 MAR 1225/26 in ,,,England


Family
Marriage:
Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William de Longespee: Birth: ABT 1183 in ,,,England. Death: 7 MAR 1225/26 in ,,,England


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Peter Arch Deacon Lincoln: Birth: ABT 1159 in of, England. Death: ABT 1218

  2. Morgan Provost of Beverly: Birth: ABT 1168 in ,,,Wales. Death: ABT 1217 in Fountains Abbey, Ripon, Yorkshire, England


Family
Marriage:
Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Geoffrey Plantagenet: Birth: ABT 1152 in of, Westminster, Middlesex, England. Death: 18 DEC 1212 in Notredameduparc, Seine-Maritime, France


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Morgan Provost of Beverly: Birth: ABT 1168 in ,,,Wales. Death: ABT 1217 in Fountains Abbey, Ripon, Yorkshire, England


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Peter Arch Deacon Lincoln: Birth: ABT 1159 in of, England. Death: ABT 1218


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Geoffrey Plantagenet: Birth: 23 SEP 1158. Death: 19 AUG 1186 in Paris


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William of Salisbury Longesp e: Birth: AFT 1160. Death: 1226 in Mansourah, Nile


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. William of Salisbury Longesp e: Birth: AFT 1160. Death: 1226 in Mansourah, Nile


Sources
1. Source:   S0005765
2. Source:   S0011294
3. Source:   S0011098
4. Source:   S0002277
5. Title:   roberts.GED egibbons.ged ralphroberts.ged 919019.ged egibbons.ged roberts.GED ralphroberts.ged egibbons.ged roberts.GED ralphroberts.ged ralphroberts.ged roberts.GED roberts.GED egibbons.ged ralphroberts.ged egibbons.ged
Source:   S0011098
6. Title:   egibbons.ged roberts.GED ralphroberts.ged egibbons.ged roberts.GED ralphroberts.ged
Source:   S0011098
7. Title:   919019.ged ralphroberts.ged
Source:   S0011098
8. Source:   S0006312
9. Source:   S0009125
10. Source:   S0009122
11. Source:   S0002454
12. Title:   Farmerie, Todd A. large-G675.FTW large-G675.FTW large-G675.FTW actuarius.ged roberts.GED roberts.GED ralphroberts.ged
Note:   NS0063123
Publication:   taf2@@po.cwru.edu undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined undefined
Source:   S0011098

Notes
a. Note:   NI025074
Note:   [ralphroberts.ged] [roberts.GED] [roberts.GED] [temp.FTW] [csaflags.ged] nickname from Mayflower p. 75 marriage date 18 may 1152/3 also known at that time as Henry FitzEmpress, Warrior Queens p. 157 NAME Henry II "Plantagenet" King of /England/ BURI PLAC Fontevrault Abbey, Fontevrault, Maine-Et-Loire, France Morby p. 69: King of England 1154-1189, first of the House of Plantagenet Morby p. 80: Count of Anjou 1151-1189 Morby p. 86: Count of Normandy 1150-1189, when it was united with England The Royal Descents of 500 Immigrants, p.345 gives William Longspee as illegitamate son of Ida later to be the wife of Roger Bigod. IGI gives the mother as Clifford, Rosamond Stuart p. 37: Duke of Normandy, Coutn of Maine and Anjou, King of England, 1154-1189 Plantagenet, surname, originally nickname, of the English royal house of Anjou or the Angevin dynasty, founded by Geoffrey IV, count of Anjou (1113-51), husband of Matilda (1102-67), daughter of King Henry I of England. The name is derived from the Latin planta (�sprig�) and genista (�broom plant�), in reference to the sprig that Geoffrey always wore in his cap. Reigning from 1154 to 1485, the Plantagenet kings, in the main line of descent, were Henry II, Richard I, John, Henry III, Edward I, Edward II, Edward III, and Richard II; through the house of Lancaster, Henry IV, Henry V, and Henry VI; and through the house of York, Edward IV, Edward V, and Richard III. "Plantagenet," Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copyright (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation. Copyright (c) 1994 Funk & Wagnall's Corporation. Henry II (of England) (1133-89), king of England (1154-89), first monarch of the house of Anjou, or Plantagenet, an important administrative reformer, who was one of the most powerful European rulers of his time. Born March 5, 1133, at Le Mans, France, Henry became duke of Normandy in 1151. The following year, on the death of his father, he inherited the Angevin territories in France. By his marriage in 1152 to Eleanor of Aquitaine, Henry added vast territories in southwestern France to his possessions. Henry claimed the English kingship through his mother, Matilda. She had been designated the heiress of Henry I but had been deprived of the succession by her cousin, Stephen of Blois, who made himself king. In 1153 Henry defeated Stephen's armies in England and compelled the king to choose him as his successor; on Stephen's death, the following year, Henry became king. During the first few years of his reign Henry quelled the disorders that had developed during Stephen's reign, regained the northern counties of England, which had previously been ceded to Scotland, and conquered North Wales. In 1171-72 he began the Norman conquest of Ireland and in 1174 forced William the Lion, king of the Scots, to recognize him as overlord. In 1164 Henry became involved in a quarrel with Thomas � Becket, whom he had appointed archbishop of Canterbury. By the Constitutions of Clarendon, the king decreed that priests accused of crimes should be tried in royal courts; Becket claimed that such cases should be handled by ecclesiastical courts, and the controversy that followed ended in 1170 with Becket's murder by four of Henry's knights. Widespread indignation over the murder forced the king to rescind his decree and recognize Becket as a martyr. Although he failed to subject the church to his courts, Henry's judicial reforms were of lasting significance. In England he established a centralized system of justice accessible to all freemen and administered by judges who traveled around the country at regular intervals. He also began the process of replacing the old trial by ordeal with modern court procedures. From the beginning of his reign, Henry was involved in conflict with Louis VII, king of France, and later with Louis's successor, Philip II, over the French provinces that Henry claimed. A succession of rebellions against Henry, headed by his sons and furthered by Philip II and by Eleanor of Aquitaine, began in 1173 and continued until his death at Chinon, France, on July 6, 1189. Henry was succeeded by his son Richard I, called Richard the Lion-Hearted. "Henry II (of England)," Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copyright (c) 1994 Microsoft Corporation. Copyright (c) 1994 Funk & Wagnall's Corporation.King of England 25 Oct 1154-1189 called Carl Mantel[rexmclrn.ged] Henry II Plantagenet de Anjou King of England[roberts.GED] [actuarius.ged] [large-G675.FTW] Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189. He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154. At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England. REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II. REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89) ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons. Acceded 1154 - 1189. Henry II Henry II (reigned 1154-89) ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. One of the strongest, most energetic and imaginative rulers, Henry was the inheritor of three dynasties who had acquired Aquitaine by marriage; his charters listed them: 'King of the English, Duke of the Normans and Aquitanians and Count of the Angevins'. The King spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. Henry's rapid movements in carrying out his dynastic responsibilities astonished the French King, who noted 'now in England, now in Normandy, he must fly rather than travel by horse or ship'. By 1158, Henry had restored to the Crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen; Malcom IV of Scotland was compelled to return the northern counties. Locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry made use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with the Archbishop of Canterbury (the king's former chief adviser), Thomas � Becket, over Church-State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170 and a papal interdict on England. Family disputes over territorial ambitions almost wrecked the king's achievements. Henry died in France in 1189, at war with his son Richard who had joined forces with king Philip of France to attack Normandy. [large-G675.FTW] Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189. He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154. At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England. REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II. REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89) ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons. [large-G675.FTW] Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p H178. 'Royalty for Commoners', Roderick W. Stuart, 1993, p 37-38. Reigned 1154-1189. He ruled an empire that stretched from the Tweed to the Pyrenees. In spite of frequent hostitilties with the French King his own family and rebellious Barons (culminating in the great revolt of 1173-74) and his quarrel with Thomas Becket, Henry maintained control over his possessions until shortly before his death. His judicial and administrative reforms which increased Royal control and influence at the expense of the Barons were of great constitutional importance. Introduced trial by Jury. Duke of Normandy. Henry II 'Curt Mantel,' Duke of Normandy, Count of Maine and Anjou, King Of England became king in 1154. At the height of his power, Henry ruled England and almost all western France. His marriage to Eleanor of Aquitaine, the most famous woman of the age, brought the duchy of Aquitaine under his control. Henry also claimed to rule Scotland, Wales, and eastern Ireland. Henry II carried on his grandfather's policy of limiting the power of the nobles. He also tried to make the Roman Catholic Church in England submit to his authority. This policy brought him into conflict with Thomas a Becket, Achbishop of Canterbury. Four of the king's knights murdered Becket while he was at vespers in his cathedral. Henry made Anglo-Saxon common law, rather than the revised Roman law, the supreme law of the land. He introduced trial by jury and circuit courts. In his later years, Henry's sons often rebelled against him. Two of them, Richard the Lion-Hearted and John, became the next two kings of England. REF: "Falls the Shadow" Sharon Kay Penman: William the Conqueror requested a large number of Jews to move to England after his conquest. They spoke Norman & did well under his reign. They continued to thrive under William's grandson Henry II. REF: British Monarchy Official Website: Henry II (reigned 1154-89) ruled over an empire which stretched from the Scottish border to the Pyrenees. Married to Eleanor, the heiress of Aquitaine, the king spent only 13 years of his reign in England; the other 21 years were spent on the continent in his territories in what is now France. By 1158, Henry had restored to the crown some of the lands and royal power lost by Stephen. For example, locally chosen sheriffs were changed into royally appointed agents charged with enforcing the law and collecting taxes in the counties. Personally interested in government and law, Henry strengthened royal justice, making use of juries and re-introduced the sending of justices (judges) on regular tours of the country to try cases for the Crown. His legal reforms have led him to be seen as the founder of English Common Law. Henry's disagreements with his Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Becket, over Church/State relations ended in Becket's murder in 1170. Family disputes almost wrecked the king's achievements and he died in 1189 at war with his sons. [roberts.GED] [temp.FTW] [glenna_inglis.ged] Please e-mail me if you download. I may have new information or corrections.


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