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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Isabella /De MORTIMER/: Birth: ABT 1248 in of, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. Death: BEF 10 AUG 1274

  2. Edmund /De MORTIMER*/: Birth: 1251 in Wigmore, Hertfordshire, England. Death: 17 JUL 1304 in Mortally wounded in Battle of Buelt


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Isabella /De MORTIMER/: Birth: ABT 1248 in of, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. Death: BEF 10 AUG 1274

  2. Ralph /De MORTIMER/: Birth: ABT 1250 in of, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. Death: BEF 10 AUG 1274

  3. Edmund /De Mortimer/: Birth: 1252 in Wigmore Herefordshire England. Death: 17 JUL 1304 in Wigmore Herefordshire England

  4. Geoffrey /De MORTIMER/: Birth: ABT 1254 in of, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England.

  5. Roger /De MORTIMER/: Birth: ABT 1256 in of, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. Death: ABT 3 AUG 1326

  6. William /De MORTIMER/: Birth: ABT 1258 in of, Wigmore, Herefordshire, England. Death: 1297 in D.S.P.


Sources
1. Title:   919019.ged
2. Title:   ralphroberts.ged
3. Title:   chaas2.ged

Notes
a. Note:   NI114802
Note:   [ralphroberts.ged] [919019.ged] This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File: Ralph De /MORTIMER/ (AFN:91QG-G0) and Llewelyn G /FERCH/ (AFN:GLCF-TX) Ralph Of W /MORTIMER/ (AFN:HNJG-KD) and Gladys Of Wales // (AFN:HNJG-LK) This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File: Ralph De /MORTIMER/ (AFN:91QG-G0) and Llewelyn G /FERCH/ (AFN:GLCF-TX) Ralph Of W /MORTIMER/ (AFN:HNJG-KD) and Gladys Of Wales // (AFN:HNJG-LK) This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File: Ralph De /MORTIMER/ (AFN:91QG-G0) and Llewelyn G /FERCH/ (AFN:GLCF-TX) Ralph Of W /MORTIMER/ (AFN:HNJG-KD) and Gladys Of Wales // (AFN:HNJG-LK) This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File: Ralph De /MORTIMER/ (AFN:91QG-G0) and Llewelyn G /FERCH/ (AFN:GLCF-TX) Ralph Of W /MORTIMER/ (AFN:HNJG-KD) and Gladys Of Wales // (AFN:HNJG-LK) This individual has the following other parents in the Ancestral File: Ralph De /MORTIMER/ (AFN:91QG-G0) and Gladys D /LLEWELLYN/ (AFN:91QG-H5) Ralph Of W /MORTIMER/ (AFN:HNJG-KD) and Gladys Of Wales // (AFN:HNJG-LK)[chaas2.ged] 1. WFT Volume 4, Tree #2728 2. From "Magna Carta Sureties, 1215" pg. 117: great grandson of King John 3. 6th Baron Mortimer of Wigmore 4. "Ancestors of Homer Beers James" (Internet) Mortimer Line: Roger de Mortimer , in the 31st year of King Henry III., paying 2,000 marks to the king, had livery of all his lands, excepting those whereof Gladys, his mother then surviving was endowed. In six years afterwards he attended the king in his expedition into Gascony, and in a few years subsequently, when Llewellyn, Prince of Wales, began again to make incursion upon the marches, received command to assist Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, in the defense of the country lying between Montgomery, and the lands of the Earl of Gloucester. In the 42nd year of the same reign he had another military summons to march with the king against the Welsh; and being in that service, had a special discharge of his scutage for those twenty-six knights' fees and a sixth part which he held in right of Maud, his wife, one of the daughters and co-heirs of William de Braose, of Brecknock. In two years afterwards he was made captain-general of all the king's forces in Wales, all the barons marchers receiving command to be attendant on him with their whole strength; and he was the same year constituted the Governor of the castle of Hereford. But notwithstanding this extensive power, and those great resources, he was eventually worsted by Llewellyn, and constrained to sue for permission to depart, which the Welsh price conceded, owing to his consanguity. After this he took and active part in the contest between Henry III. and the insurrectionary barons in favor of the former. He was at the battle of Lewes, whence he fled into Wales, and afterwards successfully planned the escape of Prince Edward. Having accomplished his prince's freedom, Mortimer, directing all his energies to the embodying a sufficient force to meet the enemy, soon placed Prince Edward in a situation to fight and win the great battle of Evesham (August 4, 1265), by which the king was restored to his freedom and his crown. In the celebrated conflict Mortimer commanded the third division of the royal army, and for his faithful services obtained, in the October following, a grant of the whole earldom and honor of Oxford, and all other the lands of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, at that time and by that treason forfeited. The Dictum of Kenilworth followed soon after the victory of Evesham, by which the defeated barons were suffered to regain their lands upon the payment of a stipulated fine, but this arrangement is said to have caused great irritation among the barons marchers, (Mortimer with the rest), who had acquired grants of these estates. He was, however, subsequently entrusted, by the crown, with the castle of Hereford, which he had orders to fortify, and was appointed Sheriff of Herefordshire. After the accession of Edward I., he continued to enjoy the sunshine of royal favor, and had other valuable grants from the crown. He married, as already stated above, Maud Braose, eldest daughter and a co-heir of William de Braose, of Brecknock. They had the following children: 1. Ralph de Mortimer, d.v.p. 2. Edmund de Mortimer, his successor. 3. Roger de Mortimer, 5th Lord of Wigmore, and lord of Chirke, part of the territories of Griffith ap Madoc, and was summoned to parliament from February 6, 1299, to November 3, 1396, as "Roger de Mortuomari," and as Baron Mortimer, of Chirke, from August 26, 1307, to May 15, 1321 (See Burke, Page 385-6). Eventually, his grandson sold to the lordship of Chirke to Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel. 4. William de Mortimer, of Bridgewater, an eminent soldier, married Hawise Musegros, heir of Robert de Musegros and his wife, Agnes Ferrers, but d.s.p. 5. Geoffrey de Mortimer, d.s.p., d.v.p. 6. Isabella Mortimer, married John Fitz Alan III. Upon having procured the honor of knighthood to be conferred by King Edward I., he caused a tournament to be held, at his own cost, at Kenilworth, where he sumptuously entertained a hundred knights and as many ladies, for three days, the like whereof was never before known in England; and there began the round table, so called from the place wherein they practiced those feats, which was encompassed by a strong wall, in a circular form. Upon the 4th day the golden lion, in token of triumph, having been yielded to him, he carried it with all that company to Warwick. The fame whereof being spread into foreign countries occasioned the Queen of Navarre to send him certain wooden bottles, bound with golden bars and wax, under the pretense of wine, but in truth filled with gold, which for many ages after were preserved in the Abbey of Wigmore. Whereupon for the love of that queen, he had added a carbuncle to his arms. This celebrated feudal lord died in 1282, and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Edmund.


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