Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Samuel Curtis Hood: Birth: 6 FEB 1918 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az. Death: 9 JAN 1996 in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, United States

  2. Mary Elizabeth Hood: Birth: 1 NOV 1921 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az. Death: 18 MAY 1923 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az

  3. Robert Franklin Hood: Birth: 25 APR 1927 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az. Death: 10 FEB 2002 in Long Island, New York, USA

  4. Dorothy Hood: Birth: 11 AUG 1930 in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona. Death: 17 APR 2005 in Mesa, Maricopa, Arizona, United States

  5. Thomas Hood: Birth: 9 JUL 1936 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az. Death: 9 JUL 1936 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az

  6. Person Not Viewable

  7. Person Not Viewable


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Josephine "Jody" Hood: Birth: 14 APR 1945 in Mesa, Maricopa, Az. Death: 22 APR 2004 in Logan Co., Utah, United States

  2. Person Not Viewable


Sources
1. Title:   My Life History by Samuel Hood Mesa 6th Ward
Text:   I was born April 28, 1889 in Empire, Dodge County, Georgia, to Elijah Ballard Hood and Mary Victory Ann Lamb, in a little Sawmill Town, 130 miles south of Atlanta Georgia. The most outstanding event in my early childhood, was a train ride I took when I was five years of age. The railroad track ran near our home this certain morning, the train stopped near our house , I climbed upon the Engine Tender and hid. A neighbor saw me as the train was pulling out, and hurried over to tell my mother he saw me on the train. She was washing the breakfast dishes and it excited and frightened her so she ran all the way into town, a distance of 2 miles with the dish towel in her hand to send a telegram ahead for the engineer to look out for me at his next stop 40 miles from Empire. The Engineer found me about 25 miles and took me in the seat by him the rest of the way in. He took me to the end of his run and took me home on his return trip. My mother was so tickled to see me she grabbed me and hugged me, but I should have been paddled. I have never did any real pioneering, I have lived in places that were already settled. My Father was born January 10, 1858 in Goldsboro, North Carolina, on a farm. He lived there until he was 18 years of age, then he left to work in the Turpine Works and and Timber in Empire, Ga. He later took up farming again and stayed with it until his death. He joined the Later Day Saint Church in 1905, at the age of 43. He had never belonged to any other church. My mother was born, March 19, 1861 on a farm in Yonkers Georgia. Her father was a Medical Doctor for years until he became disabled and was forced to quit practicing. This is where my mother met my father and they were married. They had 11 children 5 boys and 6 girls. My Mother joined the church in 1906. I was never called on a mission, but I loved taught classes in Sunday School and Mutual, and served as a Ward Teacher. I have had any Civic or Political connections. I have an 8th grade education most of it has been obtained through self studying and practical experience. Especially Mathmatics, due to my work providing a living for myself and family. I have worked for the Salt River Valley Water Users over a period of over 42 years, but 38 years straight as a Zanjero (Water Master), which requires a lot of Mathmatical figuring. I have a farmer all my life. I did some rail roading for awhile, but my eyes failed me and I had to give it up. I am now retired from the S.R.V.W.U.A. on a Pension and Social Security. I have been married twice. I met my firsr wife Mentie Emma Cooper here in Mesa and was married April 5, 1915. We had 7 children 5 now living 2 boys and 3 girls. My wife passed away July 9, 1936, leaving me with the five children. I met my second wife Amy R. Gibbons and we were married March 19, 1937. Whom I am living with now. We have two children 1 boy & 1 girl. Making me a total of 9 children 7 living. I am the proud Grandfather of 14 grand children. My oldest girl filled a mission in the California Mission. My two older boys served three years each in the Navy in World War 2. Two of my children married out of the church and have converted their companions. I feel it is a great honor to them as they went on and lived their religion and brought their companions into the church. I migrated from Southern Georgia out here in 1912. I have been in a number of states in the Union but I have never traveled abroad' I tried to enlist in the Army in the World War 1 but the war ended before I made it.
2. Title:   Questions and answers to a letter written to Sam Hood by Bertha 26 Jan. 1962
Text:   1. How did you happen to move to Arizona? A. In Feb. 1912 I had a sister living at Mesa, Arizona whose name was Beatrice Arline, now Selvitz. I was 23 years of age when I took the train to Mesa. I stayed there until the 24th day of July when I took the train back to Georgia. I went back to Mesa April 4, 1914. June 1914. I met Mentie Cooper at church in Mesa Third Ward June 1914. It was June Conference. Mentie and her brother invited me to go to their home for dinner that Sunday, but I did not go, but I did go later or the next Sunday. This was not love at first sight. I would go with other girls and her in the group and we all would rent a buggy and horse to go buggy riding each Sunday. We rented these from the Livery Stable,..... Then Mentie and I started going together, and we would go to the restaurant right after Sunday School, each lunch, then go riding, We would usually get in about midnight, as the longest way was the shortest way home. Mentie's mother, Telitha Ann Cooper would worry until we got home. Grandpa Cooper always went on to bed. We were courting each other from October 1914, until about October 1915. We were in the orange grove north of grandpa Cooper's house eating oranges when I asked Mentie to marry me. She seemed to be very happy, but she did not give me a reply until about a week later. We then decided we would go to Spring Conference at Salt Lake City in 1916, and were married on the 5th of April, 1916 in Salt Lake. We spent two weeks there and then returned to Mesa. I went back to work for Hugh Dana and worked until April 12, 1917, and went to U.S. Reclamation Service and worked until Jan. 1, 1955. 2. How old were you? A. 23 3. Did you stay right at first with Hugh Dana? A. No, I headquartered at old man Phillip Coleman's home. 4. Did you stay with Hugh Dana until you were married? A. I started to work for Hugh Dana who was road foreman for Maricopa Highway Department in 1914. I made $2.50 a day then when it started. I worked then for the U.S. Reclamation Service out of Tempe until about December until they got the power house finished, and then I went back to Hugh Dana to work. I stayed with this job with Hugh Dana and the Maricopa Hy. until after I was married in 1916. 5. Where was your first home with Mentie? Was it that tent house? A. No, it was in quite a large adobe house on the No. east corner of Hugh Dana's house. First home an adobe building on Hugh Dana's place. Was an old original Dana home.(Bertha typed answers in so I could send copy to Susan Linder who wrote for information.) Written on the back of this sheet are more notes as follows; 1915 =Hugh 1917 1918 1919 = Live at Hugh Dana and farmed. Had 40 acres land and made $9,000 clear. Everything looked so good. Eli F. Bought farm tractor $850, plow $250, I ran cotton planter. 1920 = going to rent Cooper ranch while going on one year visit to Florida. But after dad had started to work his land he changed his mind and tore up the contract. So rented Tom Watkins place while he went on mission to California. But bottom fell out cotton that year and they didn't make anything. It took himself three or four years to pay back the debts he said they had. Application to work for the water users in March. Happened there was a job open and he got his Ford car and went to work for $70 a month. Were living across the road from Grandma and Grandpa Cooper then moved bach into Aunt Mamies tent house in 500 block W. Main. 6. Where were you living when Curtis was born? A. On West Main Street in Mesa. In Aunt Mamie and Uncle John Stinson's house or tent house. Curtis was born? February 6, 1918 in the tent house on West Main Street, Mesa, Arizona. Bertha was born? Down by Hugh Dana's place in a lumber house, November, November 7, 1919. Mary was born? 249 West Second Street, Mesa, Arizona, November 1, 1921. Ruth was born? 104 North Morris Street, Mesa, Arizona, October 1, 1923. Bob was born? 240 North Morris Street, Mesa, Arizona, April 25, 1927. Dorithy was born? 240 North Morris Street, Mesa Arizona, August 25, 1930. 7. When did you start working for the water users, what year? A. 1917 when I went on steady as a water man. 8. Did you retire in 1954 or when? A. Jan. 1,1955. Spent 38 years on this job. 9. Do you know where I could contact any of your Grandfather Lamb's people? Does he have any brothers, or nephews or nieces living in Georgia? A. Mistress K. D. Tripp, 505 Kibbee Street, Hawkinsville, Ga. Phone 34236. That is grandfather Lamb's granddaughter. She is my mother's oldest sister's daughter. If you will contact her she can tell you about them. Written on the back of this sheet are more notes as follows: 1914- Left Georgia by train and went to Salt Lake City. Stayed with missionary J. A. Barrett family for several weeks. Was planning on settling in Utah but his brother Bob had come out to Lone Pine, Calif. with his sister Viola to get married to George Hancock. He wrote and told Sam how wonderful the country was there and he was going to file for a homestead and wanted him to come out. So he went to Lone Pine in spring (march) 1914 but didn't find that the land was as good as his brother said. The spring that he found on the land was only melting snow water--so he went on to Mesa, Arizona--worked around at jobs he could get & then went to work for Hugh Dana and highway--1912 worked with waterusers. Hugh Dana was road foreman and he went to work for him and worked until 12 March 1917 Zanjero. Retired January 1955. 10. Was your Grandmother Lamb the only child her mother Emily Rogers ever had? A. Yes, she went by the name of Robert Ann Rogers. 11. Did your Grandmother Lamb ever know her father? A. I don't think so. She was an only child her mother Emily Rogers ever had. Emily was unmarried when Robert Ann Rogers was born. Robert Ann was 14 years old when she married Floyd Lamb. She was born in 1843. Grandfather Floyd Lamb was born in 1819. 12. What name did she go by? Annie Morgan, Robert Ann Morgan, Roberta Ann Rogers or what? A. She went by the name of Robert Ann Rogers. (Written at bottom of page in red:) Sam Hood said in letter December 1961 from Tulsa Oklahoma, Floyd Lamb was an M.D. practiced around Younker, Ga. He was not a mormon. I was baptized for him in 1916 and his work in Salt Lake Temple. His wife died in 1922. 13. What do you remember about your Grandfather and Grandmother Lamb? A. They lived on a farm near Yonkers, Ga. Grandmother lived there until two or three months before she died. She then went to live a short while with Mrs. Tripp's father and Mother, who were Archie Warren. His wife was Eliza. Grandmother died at this home. She was buried at Macedona, a Baptist Church, about one mile north of her home, which is about 2 1/2 miles north of Yonkers, Ga.
3. Title:   From "Life history of Sam Hood" 6 December, 1963
Text:   At shop in Ukiah, California Sam Hood said to stretch their shoes when they were youngsters they put cotton seed in their shoes and wet them and let them swell and stretch the shoe. 7. Dad how much school did you have? -- I remember you joking about walking in one door and out another? -- What sort of school was it? I, Sam Hood, attended school around Empire and Roddy, Georgia, just a few weeks at a time, amounting to a total of about 4 or 5 months of schooling. I liked Spelling, Arithmatic and Geography. All I had was hand me down books that other kids did not want. I use to lay down on the floor by the open fire and read by the firelight. The first school teacher I ever went to was Addie Young who was a big fat old maid teacher. I wet my pants every day and she would whip me for it. She sent me down to the woods to get a switch, and I did not have a knife to cut one. So she followed me and found me xxxxxxx stooped over chewing with my teeth. That stopped her whipping me and she never whipped me any more. I would ask to be excused to leave to go to the toilet, and she would not let me go, therefore I could not hold my water and wet my pants. 8. Do you remember the missionaries who converted you? -- How old were you ? I was 21 years old when I was baptized. William J. Ethington baptized me at Empire. Elder S. M. McKinney confirmed me. Baptized 17th day of July or August, 1910, at Empire, Ga. in the creek that runs through the home place, now Parker's place.The name of the creek is Walton. I was ordained a Priest by Elder ? .
4. Title:   Questions and answers to a letter written to Sam Hood by Bertha in Dec 1961
Text:   1.- Is your mother's name Victoria or Victory? A. Victoria. 2- Do you know when your grandfather Robert B. Hood moved from North Carolina to Georgia? A. Do not know. It was just after Civil War and then moved to Cochran (county seat) Ga. and lived there a long while. Lucky got it from there and Sampson Parker has the property at Empire, Georgia. Now Sampson Parker can look at deeds and tell you. Before war property sold for $2.50 (this could be $2,50 which might mean $2,500.00 for 175 acres, after Civil War sold $400.00 for 175 acres. Contack Parker. 3- Do you know if Robert B. Hood kept a diary or had a bible or any family records? A. Mary B. Roberts had the Hood family Bible. She built a new house and moved and they put the Bible in the barrell with other books when they moved, and the rats got into the barrell and destroyed the books, Bible included included. Mary Roberts is now deceased. Her daughter, Mrs. Letecia Green, at Empire Georgia, Route 1, and she will get it. She might be able to give you more information. 4- Do you know where Sam Hood is? (That young fellow from North Carolina who was in our home in Mesa?) A. Sam Hood got killed in an automobile accident. He was working in Philadelphia and about. Five or six years ago he was killed. Write Mrs. Burney Hood in Raleigh, N.C. You should have that information, as you corresponded with Sam after he visited Mesa. 5- Who was the first in your family to become "Mormon"? A. Mary Hood Johnson and then Ed, Abbie and Viola. this group was baptized in 1905 at Empire, Ga. Mother , dad, Annie and Beatrice were later, but I do not know when they were baptized. 6- Was grandfather Floyd Lamb a Doctor? A. Yes, he was an M.D. He practiced around Younker, Ga. He was not a Mormon. I was baptized for him in 1916 in Salt Lake Temple and did his work for him. His wife died in 1922. 7- Did your mother and father live in Empire most of their lives? A. They lived in West Farm just east of Madison Florida. They had one child who died, (William) about age of 4 months ). Then they went back to Empire Ga. and stayed until 1911; then then moved down near Alme where sister Mary lived, and father died December 1942, and mother died 24 of Jan. 1947 and buried at Axson, Ga. Ed can give you more information than I can. Dad and mother both buried right there by the church. Sister Mary buried right beside them, he did general farming, cotton, vegetables and livestoch. I built at Empire , Ga. in the yard 1910 and it still stands. It contained three rooms and a porch, the portion I built on. 8- Does Aunt Abbie live in your parents original home? A. Abbie lives in R. B. Hood's original hoo\me.(log cabin). They have since put siding on it now.
5. Title:   Letter to Darl Hood
Text:   We really enjoyed getting your letter, because it gives us a chance to sit down and finally put some of these things in writing. Regarding my dad's name, Samuel L. Green Hood. He always told the story that he was not given a name until he was six years old in 1895. Apparently a census taker came around and wanted the names of everyone that lived in Empire, Georgia. Dad always said he was a sickly child and his parents hadn't expected him to live so they just put off giving him a name. They called him "Hammer" and "Cowboy," but the census taker wouldn't let it go at that. He pulled out a list of names and had dad run his finger down them even though he couldn't read. Dad always said he stopped on the shortest name he could find, which was Sam. The name he chose was recorded as Samuel L. Green, who was a black doctor in that part of Georgia. Dad always refused to use the "L. Green" because he said it had belonged to a black man. What you have to understand is that Dad was born only 24 years after the Civil War ended, and he learned to shun anything that even hinted of being black. Apparently Dad and his father never did get along very well. Dad always said he was a very picky eater and at times just did not have much of an appetite because he didn't feel well. He said he could remember more than once his dad demanding that a plate of dirt be put before him if he refused to eat what was fixed. I can understand the frustration of a parent with a child who doesn't eat well. All of our children are asthmatics, and my son more than any will not eat when he doesn't feel well. Martin has always said food smothers him when he is having difficulty breathing. I am sure my dad was the same way. In fact, Dad ran away from home when he was 15 years old in 1904, and never returned to live there full time again. He would go back and visit, but he worked as a fireman on the railroad for a time and just rambled for a while picking up work wherever he happened to be. He finally settled down in Mesa, Arizona, in February 1912. He entered the state the day it was granted statehood, and he was quoted as saying that they had to wait until he arrived before it achieved statehood. The tradition that was always handed down about his Grandmother Robert Ann Lamb was that her parents never married. Supposedly John Morgan was from a well-to-do family and she was from a poor one, and his parents refused to let them get married. Her mother, Emmaline Rogers was sent to Washington, D. C., while she was pregnant and that is where Robert Ann was born. It makes sense that if her name was Robert Ann that she would go by "Annie." We also thought that the Lambs were from Ireland, however, the Dublin they refer to is Dublin, Georgia and were original settlers in this of the counties in this area known as the "Wire Grass area of Georgia." We were going to follow up on the leads we have found over the past few months during the Christmas season. Michael and I both had the week between Christmas and New Year's off, but we also both had the flu, too. We never did feel well enough to drive the 70 miles to Salt Lake and spend a day in the genealogical library following up on these leads. As to my half-brothers and sisters, I don't correspond much with Curtis, but I do with Bertha quite a bit. I am from my dad's second marriage, and my parents divorced after being married 23 years. There was a coolness from most of them until about 15 years ago when I started corresponding and talking to Bertha regularly. So I can't really tell you much about Curtis and his family. Bertha's son that you ask about is William or Bill. Bertha said he was never the same after he returned from Viet Nam. He apparently suffered from the post traumatic stress syndrome that so many of the returning veterans did, and it eventually took its toll. He death was ruled as a suicide, but her husband, Bud, just could never accept that. I think that is why they told everyone it was a hunting accident. He was out in the country in his car when they found him. Perhaps it is best if you still call it a hunting accident if you write or talk to them about it. Bertha is no longer in California. They returned to Hoffman, Oklahoma, early last year. It just did not work for them to live right in with their daughter and her husband. They lived in the foothills above Ukiah, California, and they did not like the snow and cold. They both are rather crippled up from arthritis, birth defects, and accidents and walking on the ice was very dangerous for them. Bertha was born with one leg about six inches shorter than the other, and both she and Bud have been injured in car accidents that have made matters worse. Bud's accident in the early 50's left him with one leg shorter than the other, and he was rehabilitate as a shoe repairman in California where they ran their own store for close to 25 years in Ukiah. Her address is P. O. Box 462, Dewar, Oklahoma 74431 and her phone is (918)652-9775. Hoffman no longer has a post office and there is no delivery so they have to drive about five miles to Dewar (pronounced as Doer) to get their mail. They are much happier here because they have their own apartment that is connected to their oldest daughter's house. It gives them a little more privacy and independence. No one has seen Robert Barfield Hood since 1960. He had been gone for many years and showed up asking for money from my dad. When he got what he wanted he left, and no one has heard from him again. None of us have any idea whether he is dead or alive. Yes, Ruth and Johnnie had a big family. Their children are: Ruthie Crandall, Samuel Linder, Susan Green, Linda Hendrix, Eddie Linder, David Linder, Teresa Anderson, and Dawna. I can't remember Dawna's married name. Their address is 1404 South Spenser, Mesa, AZ 85204. I am fairly close to their two daughters Ruthie and Linda as we are about the same age. Dorothy and Frank "Bud" Koubik never were able to have children. Her address is 49365 Alpine Avenue North, Stanfield, Minesota. Her husband died in April 1992 of a heart attack during surgery for a hiatal hernia. She spent last winter with Ruth and Johnnie in Mesa, Arizona, and this year she is spending it with Curtis and his wife in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. I have one full brother and his name is Richard Ballard Hood, and he lives in New Ulm, Minnesota. His story is a little of that like Bob's in that he took off and no one knew where he was for nine years, and then suddenly he called me out of the blue. He and his third wife have lived in New Ulm since 1979. He and I talk on the telephone occasionally, but unfortunately we have very little in common anymore. I wound up raising his two sons from his first marriage part time from the age of 12 and full time when each of them turned 16. His oldest, Rick, is now 26 years old and drives truck for England Trucking out of Salt Lake City. He is thinking very seriously of getting married. The younger boy, Tim, is 24 years old and married with a baby that is almost a year old and another one on the way in May. He and his wife live in Salt Lake City. We see them quite often and their little boy is like a grandson to us. My mother was descended through the Gibbons and Wilhelm families. Both families were early Mormon pioneers and joined the Mormon church in its early days in the 1830s. They came west in the major migration during and after 1847. My great grandfather, Andrew Smith Gibbons, was one of the seven scouts that explored the best route for the first of the 1847 wagon trains to take. He was among the first group to enter the Salt Lake Valley in July 1847. However, he return to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he helped to guide other wagon trains west until 1853 when the Mormon settlers had to vacate the Indian land they were living on. He then moved his family to Salt Lake City then. Shortly after arriving in Salt Lake City, he was sent to southern Utah to help with Indian trouble because he apparently had such a calming effect on them. He and his family lived in 13 or 14 different communities in southern Utah, southern Nevada, and northern Arizona. Our family tradition says he planted nine peach orchards before he was able to harvest fruit from any of them that he planted. Just as he would get established, he would be sent into another area to calm the Indians. He and his sons finally settled in St. Johns, Arizona, in the northeastern part of the state. St. Johns is very close to both the Apache and Navajo Indian Reservations. In addition, he was one of the first three white men to visited the Hopi Indians in the village of Moencopi. Moencopi is the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in all of North America, because the Hopis have been there for centuries. Andrew Smith Gibbons life story was chronicled in a book by Helen Bay Gibbons called "Saint and Savage," published by Deseret Book. However, I understand it is no longer in print. The Gibbons family also got together in 1980 and published a family history called "The Turning of the Hearts," and starts with Andrew Smith Gibbons' father, William Davidson Gibbons. The only bad thing about the book is that it does not have an index and it was done before the days of PC computers. His son, Richard Gibbons, was my grandfather, and he too was one of the original Arizona pioneers. He was heavily involved in cleaning up the lawlessness that plagued Arizona into the 20th century. In fact, he was elected to the Territorial Legislature of 1901 and co-sponsored a bill that created the Arizona Rangers after the pattern of the Texas Rangers. Their community of St. Johns was on the route from areas like Tombstone to the Robber's Roost (of Butch Cassidy fame), and they were always being plagued by ruthless outlaws. I have 800 typewritten pages of his journals that go from 1888 to 1924 when he died. The Wilhelms' story is much the same. John Benjamin and Clarrisa Harding Wilhelm joined the Mormon church in Ohio in 1842 and started making plans to move to Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo on October 1, 1844 and stayed there in the winter of 1846 when the Mormons were forced to leave. Instead of going to Winter Quarters near Council Bluff, Iowa, as did most of those who were forced to leave, they went to Weston, Missouri, where Clarrisa ran a boarding house. Her husband was very ill and she stayed there until her husband died on March 8, 1851. She then took her children west by herself working as a cook on a wagon train to earn her passage. Her son, Bateman Haight Wilhelm married Lydia Hannah Draper, who was from another family who came west in the Mormon migration of 1847. Bateman and Lydia also lived all over southern Utah and northern Arizona. Their daughter, Clarrisa Isabell Wilhelm married my grandfather, Richard Gibbons, and their daughter, Amy Gibbons married my dad, Sam Hood. We have copied a great deal of this information that we have printed out from the computer and are sending it to you in a separate package. The research we have gathered that has already been done takes the Gibbons and Wilhelm families into colonial New England. Their roots go back to Massachusetts and Connecticut, while we have found the Hood-Lamb ancestors, apparently, go into colonial Virginia. I was born in Mesa, Arizona, on April 14, 1945, and lived there until Michael and I were married on March 25, 1967. We have lived in Tucson, Arizona; San Jos Costa Rica; Preston, Idaho; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Moab, Utah; Blanding, Utah; and Tremonton, Utah. We have been in Tremonton since December 1976. Our children's birth places sound a little like a travel log. Amy Jo was born in Costa Rica; Juliet was born in Rexburg, Idaho; Ruth was born in Moab, Utah; and Martin was born in Monticello, Utah. There were times I wondered if we would ever stop living the life of gypsies and settle down in one place, but we finally did. Well, I hope this answers some of your questions about my family. As I said we will make copies of the information we have and send it to you. Jody H. Jensen

Notes
a. Note:   BIRTH CERTIFICATE IN THE POSSESSION OF PATRON LISTED CORRECTLY IN THE IGI. MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE IN THE POSSESION OF PATRON DEATH CERTIFICATE IN THE POSSESION OF PATRON My Life History by Samuel Hood Mesa 6th Ward I was born April 28, 1889 in Empire, Dodge County, Georgia, to Elijah Ballard Hood and Mary Victory Ann Lamb, in a little Sawmill Town, 130 miles south of Atlanta Georgia. The most outstanding event in my early childhood, was a train ride I took when I was five years of age. The railroad track ran near our home this certain morning, the train stopped near our house , I climbed upon the Engine Tender and hid. A neighbor saw me as the train was pulling out, and hurried over to tell my mother he saw me on the train. She was washing the breakfast dishes and it excited and frightened her so she ran all the way into town, a distance of 2 miles with the dish towel in her hand to send a telegram ahead for the engineer to look out for me at his next stop 40 miles from Empire. The Engineer found me about 25 miles and took me in the seat by him the rest of the way in. He took me to the end of his run and took me home on his return trip. My mother was so tickled to see me she grabbed me and hugged me, but I should have been paddled. I have never did any real pioneering, I have lived in places that were already settled. My Father was born January 10, 1858 in Goldsboro, North Carolina, on a farm. He lived there until he was 18 years of age, then he left to work in the Turpine Works and and Timber in Empire, Ga. He later took up farming again and stayed with it until his death. He joined the Later Day Saint Church in 1905, at the age of 43. He had never belonged to any other church. My mother was born, March 19, 1861 on a farm in Yonkers Georgia. Her father was a Medical Doctor for years until he became disabled and was forced to quit practicing. This is where my mother met my father and they were married. They had 11 children 5 boys and 6 girls. My Mother joined the church in 1906. I was never called on a mission, but I loved taught classes in Sunday School and Mutual, and served as a Ward Teacher. I have had any Civic or Political connections. I have an 8th grade education most of it has been obtained through self studying and practical experience. Especially Mathmatics, due to my work providing a living for myself and family. I have worked for the Salt River Valley Water Users over a period of over 42 years, but 38 years straight as a Zanjero (Water Master), which requires a lot of Mathmatical figuring. I have a farmer all my life. I did some rail roading for awhile, but my eyes failed me and I had to give it up. I am now retired from the S.R.V.W.U.A. on a Pension and Social Security. I have been married twice. I met my firsr wife Mentie Emma Cooper here in Mesa and was married April 5, 1915. We had 7 children 5 now living 2 boys and 3 girls. My wife passed away July 9, 1936, leaving me with the five children. I met my second wife Amy R. Gibbons and we were married March 19, 1937. Whom I am living with now. We have two children 1 boy & 1 girl. Making me a total of 9 children 7 living. I am the proud Grandfather of 14 grand children. My oldest girl filled a mission in the California Mission. My two older boys served three years each in the Navy in World War 2. Two of my children married out of the church and have converted their companions. I feel it is a great honor to them as they went on and lived their religion and brought their companions into the church. I migrated from Southern Georgia out here in 1912. I have been in a number of states in the Union but I have never traveled abroad' I tried to enlist in the Army in the World War 1 but the war ended before I made it. From "Questions and answers to a letter written to Sam Hood by Bertha 26 Jan. 1962. 1. How did you happen to move to Arizona? A. In Feb. 1912 I had a sister living at Mesa, Arizona whose name was Beatrice Arline, now Selvitz. I was 23 years of age when I took the train to Mesa. I stayed there until the 24th day of July when I took the train back to Georgia. I went back to Mesa April 4, 1914. June 1914. I met Mentie Cooper at church in Mesa Third Ward June 1914. It was June Conference. Mentie and her brother invited me to go to their home for dinner that Sunday, but I did not go, but I did go later or the next Sunday. This was not love at first sight. I would go with other girls and her in the group and we all would rent a buggy and horse to go buggy riding each Sunday. We rented these from the Livery Stable,..... Then Mentie and I started going together, and we would go to the restaurant right after Sunday School, each lunch, then go riding, We would usually get in about midnight, as the longest way was the shortest way home. Mentie's mother, Telitha Ann Cooper would worry until we got home. Grandpa Cooper always went on to bed. We were courting each other from October 1914, until about October 1915. We were in the orange grove north of grandpa Cooper's house eating oranges when I asked Mentie to marry me. She seemed to be very happy, but she did not give me a reply until about a week later. We then decided we would go to Spring Conference at Salt Lake City in 1916, and were married on the 5th of April, 1916 in Salt Lake. We spent two weeks there and then returned to Mesa. I went back to work for Hugh Dana and worked until April 12, 1917, and went to U.S. Reclamation Service and worked until Jan. 1, 1955. 2. How old were you? A. 23 3. Did you stay right at first with Hugh Dana? A. No, I headquartered at old man Phillip Coleman's home. 4. Did you stay with Hugh Dana until you were married? A. I started to work for Hugh Dana who was road foreman for Maricopa Highway Department in 1914. I made $2.50 a day then when it started. I worked then for the U.S. Reclamation Service out of Tempe until about December until they got the power house finished, and then I went back to Hugh Dana to work. I stayed with this job with Hugh Dana and the Maricopa Hy. until after I was married in 1916. 5. Where was your first home with Mentie? Was it that tent house? A. No, it was in quite a large adobe house on the No. east corner of Hugh Dana's house. First home an adobe building on Hugh Dana's place. Was an old original Dana home.(Bertha typed answers in so I could send copy to Susan Linder who wrote for information.) Written on the back of this sheet are more notes as follows; 1915 =Hugh 1917 1918 1919 = Live at Hugh Dana and farmed. Had 40 acres land and made $9,000 clear. Everything looked so good. Eli F. Bought farm tractor $850, plow $250, I ran cotton planter. 1920 = going to rent Cooper ranch while going on one year visit to Florida. But after dad had started to work his land he changed his mind and tore up the contract. So rented Tom Watkins place while he went on mission to California. But bottom fell out cotton that year and they didn't make anything. It took himself three or four years to pay back the debts he said they had. Application to work for the water users in March. Happened there was a job open and he got his Ford car and went to work for $70 a month. Were living across the road from Grandma and Grandpa Cooper then moved bach into Aunt Mamies tent house in 500 block W. Main. 6. Where were you living when Curtis was born? A. On West Main Street in Mesa. In Aunt Mamie and Uncle John Stinson's house or tent house. Curtis was born? February 6, 1918 in the tent house on West Main Street, Mesa, Arizona. Bertha was born? Down by Hugh Dana's place in a lumber house, November, November 7, 1919. Mary was born? 249 West Second Street, Mesa, Arizona, November 1, 1921. Ruth was born? 104 North Morris Street, Mesa, Arizona, October 1, 1923. Bob was born? 240 North Morris Street, Mesa, Arizona, April 25, 1927. Dorithy was born? 240 North Morris Street, Mesa Arizona, August 25, 1930. 7. When did you start working for the water users, what year? A. 1917 when I went on steady as a water man. 8. Did you retire in 1954 or when? A. Jan. 1,1955. Spent 38 years on this job. 9. Do you know where I could contact any of your Grandfather Lamb's people? Does he have any brothers, or nephews or nieces living in Georgia? A. Mistress K. D. Tripp, 505 Kibbee Street, Hawkinsville, Ga. Phone 34236. That is grandfather Lamb's granddaughter. She is my mother's oldest sister's daughter. If you will contact her she can tell you about them. Written on the back of this sheet are more notes as follows: 1914- Left Georgia by train and went to Salt Lake City. Stayed with missionary J. A. Barrett family for several weeks. Was planning on settling in Utah but his brother Bob had come out to Lone Pine, Calif. with his sister Viola to get married to George Hancock. He wrote and told Sam how wonderful the country was there and he was going to file for a homestead and wanted him to come out. So he went to Lone Pine in spring (march) 1914 but didn't find that the land was as good as his brother said. The spring that he found on the land was only melting snow water--so he went on to Mesa, Arizona--worked around at jobs he could get & then went to work for Hugh Dana and highway--1912 worked with waterusers. Hugh Dana was road foreman and he went to work for him and worked until 12 March 1917 Zanjero. Retired January 1955. 10. Was your Grandmother Lamb the only child her mother Emily Rogers ever had? A. Yes, she went by the name of Robert Ann Rogers. 11. Did your Grandmother Lamb ever know her father? A. I don't think so. She was an only child her mother Emily Rogers ever had. Emily was unmarried when Robert Ann Rogers was born. Robert Ann was 14 years old when she married Floyd Lamb. She was born in 1843. Grandfather Floyd Lamb was born in 1819. 12. What name did she go by? Annie Morgan, Robert Ann Morgan, Roberta Ann Rogers or what? A. She went by the name of Robert Ann Rogers. (Written at bottom of page in red:) Sam Hood said in letter December 1961 from Tulsa Oklahoma, Floyd Lamb was an M.D. practiced around Younker, Ga. He was not a mormon. I was baptized for him in 1916 and his work in Salt Lake Temple. His wife died in 1922. 13. What do you remember about your Grandfather and Grandmother Lamb? A. They lived on a farm near Yonkers, Ga. Grandmother lived there until two or three months before she died. She then went to live a short while with Mrs. Tripp's father and Mother, who were Archie Warren. His wife was Eliza. Grandmother died at this home. She was buried at Macedona, a Baptist Church, about one mile north of her home, which is about 2 1/2 miles north of Yonkers, Ga. From "Life history of Sam Hood" 6 December, 1963 At shop in Ukiah, California Sam Hood said to stretch their shoes when they were youngsters they put cotton seed in their shoes and wet them and let them swell and stretch the shoe. 7. Dad how much school did you have? -- I remember you joking about walking in one door and out another? -- What sort of school was it? I, Sam Hood, attended school around Empire and Roddy, Georgia, just a few weeks at a time, amounting to a total of about 4 or 5 months of schooling. I liked Spelling, Arithmatic and Geography. All I had was hand me down books that other kids did not want. I use to lay down on the floor by the open fire and read by the firelight. The first school teacher I ever went to was Addie Young who was a big fat old maid teacher. I wet my pants every day and she would whip me for it. She sent me down to the woods to get a switch, and I did not have a knife to cut one. So she followed me and found me xxxxxxx stooped over chewing with my teeth. That stopped her whipping me and she never whipped me any more. I would ask to be excused to leave to go to the toilet, and she would not let me go, therefore I could not hold my water and wet my pants. 8. Do you remember the missionaries who converted you? -- How old were you ? I was 21 years old when I was baptized. William J. Ethington baptized me at Empire. Elder S. M. McKinney confirmed me. Baptized 17th day of July or August, 1910, at Empire, Ga. in the creek that runs through the home place, now Parker's place.The name of the creek is Walton. I was ordained a Priest by Elder ? . Questions and answers to a letter written to Sam Hood by Bertha in December 1961 1.- Is your mother's name Victoria or Victory? A. Victoria. 2- Do you know when your grandfather Robert B. Hood moved from North Carolina to Georgia? A. Do not know. It was just after Civil War and then moved to Cochran (county seat) Ga. and lived there a long while. Lucky got it from there and Sampson Parker has the property at Empire, Georgia. Now Sampson Parker can look at deeds and tell you. Before war property sold for $2.50 (this could be $2,50 which might mean $2,500.00 for 175 acres, after Civil War sold $400.00 for 175 acres. Contack Parker. 3- Do you know if Robert B. Hood kept a diary or had a bible or any family records? A. Mary B. Roberts had the Hood family Bible. She built a new house and moved and they put the Bible in the barrell with other books when they moved, and the rats got into the barrell and destroyed the books, Bible included included. Mary Roberts is now deceased. Her daughter, Mrs. Letecia Green, at Empire Georgia, Route 1, and she will get it. She might be able to give you more information. 4- Do you know where Sam Hood is? (That young fellow from North Carolina who was in our home in Mesa?) A. Sam Hood got killed in an automobile accident. He was working in Philadelphia and about. Five or six years ago he was killed. Write Mrs. Burney Hood in Raleigh, N.C. You should have that information, as you corresponded with Sam after he visited Mesa. 5- Who was the first in your family to become "Mormon"? A. Mary Hood Johnson and then Ed, Abbie and Viola. this group was baptized in 1905 at Empire, Ga. Mother , dad, Annie and Beatrice were later, but I do not know when they were baptized. 6- Was grandfather Floyd Lamb a Doctor? A. Yes, he was an M.D. He practiced around Younker, Ga. He was not a Mormon. I was baptized for him in 1916 in Salt Lake Temple and did his work for him. His wife died in 1922. 7- Did your mother and father live in Empire most of their lives? A. They lived in West Farm just east of Madison Florida. They had one child who died, (William) about age of 4 months ). Then they went back to Empire Ga. and stayed until 1911; then then moved down near Alme where sister Mary lived, and father died December 1942, and mother died 24 of Jan. 1947 and buried at Axson, Ga. Ed can give you more information than I can. Dad and mother both buried right there by the church. Sister Mary buried right beside them, he did general farming, cotton, vegetables and livestoch. I built at Empire , Ga. in the yard 1910 and it still stands. It contained three rooms and a porch, the portion I built on. 8- Does Aunt Abbie live in your parents original home? A. Abbie lives in R. B. Hood's original hoo\me.(log cabin). They have since put siding on it now. __________ 326 South Tremont Tremonton UT 84337 Dear Darl, We really enjoyed getting your letter, because it gives us a chance to sit down and finally put some of these things in writing. Regarding my dad's name, Samuel L. Green Hood. He always told the story that he was not given a name until he was six years old in 1895. Apparently a census taker came around and wanted the names of everyone that lived in Empire, Georgia. Dad always said he was a sickly child and his parents hadn't expected him to live so they just put off giving him a name. They called him "Hammer" and "Cowboy," but the census taker wouldn't let it go at that. He pulled out a list of names and had dad run his finger down them even though he couldn't read. Dad always said he stopped on the shortest name he could find, which was Sam. The name he chose was recorded as Samuel L. Green, who was a black doctor in that part of Georgia. Dad always refused to use the "L. Green" because he said it had belonged to a black man. What you have to understand is that Dad was born only 24 years after the Civil War ended, and he learned to shun anything that even hinted of being black. Apparently Dad and his father never did get along very well. Dad always said he was a very picky eater and at times just did not have much of an appetite because he didn't feel well. He said he could remember more than once his dad demanding that a plate of dirt be put before him if he refused to eat what was fixed. I can understand the frustration of a parent with a child who doesn't eat well. All of our children are asthmatics, and my son more than any will not eat when he doesn't feel well. Martin has always said food smothers him when he is having difficulty breathing. I am sure my dad was the same way. In fact, Dad ran away from home when he was 15 years old in 1904, and never returned to live there full time again. He would go back and visit, but he worked as a fireman on the railroad for a time and just rambled for a while picking up work wherever he happened to be. He finally settled down in Mesa, Arizona, in February 1912. He entered the state the day it was granted statehood, and he was quoted as saying that they had to wait until he arrived before it achieved statehood. The tradition that was always handed down about his Grandmother Robert Ann Lamb was that her parents never married. Supposedly John Morgan was from a well-to-do family and she was from a poor one, and his parents refused to let them get married. Her mother, Emmaline Rogers was sent to Washington, D. C., while she was pregnant and that is where Robert Ann was born. It makes sense that if her name was Robert Ann that she would go by "Annie." We also thought that the Lambs were from Ireland, however, the Dublin they refer to is Dublin, Georgia and were original settlers in this of the counties in this area known as the "Wire Grass area of Georgia." We were going to follow up on the leads we have found over the past few months during the Christmas season. Michael and I both had the week between Christmas and New Year's off, but we also both had the flu, too. We never did feel well enough to drive the 70 miles to Salt Lake and spend a day in the genealogical library following up on these leads. As to my half-brothers and sisters, I don't correspond much with Curtis, but I do with Bertha quite a bit. I am from my dad's second marriage, and my parents divorced after being married 23 years. There was a coolness from most of them until about 15 years ago when I started corresponding and talking to Bertha regularly. So I can't really tell you much about Curtis and his family. Bertha's son that you ask about is William or Bill. Bertha said he was never the same after he returned from Viet Nam. He apparently suffered from the post traumatic stress syndrome that so many of the returning veterans did, and it eventually took its toll. He death was ruled as a suicide, but her husband, Bud, just could never accept that. I think that is why they told everyone it was a hunting accident. He was out in the country in his car when they found him. Perhaps it is best if you still call it a hunting accident if you write or talk to them about it. Bertha is no longer in California. They returned to Hoffman, Oklahoma, early last year. It just did not work for them to live right in with their daughter and her husband. They lived in the foothills above Ukiah, California, and they did not like the snow and cold. They both are rather crippled up from arthritis, birth defects, and accidents and walking on the ice was very dangerous for them. Bertha was born with one leg about six inches shorter than the other, and both she and Bud have been injured in car accidents that have made matters worse. Bud's accident in the early 50's left him with one leg shorter than the other, and he was rehabilitate as a shoe repairman in California where they ran their own store for close to 25 years in Ukiah. Her address is P. O. Box 462, Dewar, Oklahoma 74431 and her phone is (918)652-9775. Hoffman no longer has a post office and there is no delivery so they have to drive about five miles to Dewar (pronounced as Doer) to get their mail. They are much happier here because they have their own apartment that is connected to their oldest daughter's house. It gives them a little more privacy and independence. No one has seen Robert Barfield Hood since 1960. He had been gone for many years and showed up asking for money from my dad. When he got what he wanted he left, and no one has heard from him again. None of us have any idea whether he is dead or alive. Yes, Ruth and Johnnie had a big family. Their children are: Ruthie Crandall, Samuel Linder, Susan Green, Linda Hendrix, Eddie Linder, David Linder, Teresa Anderson, and Dawna. I can't remember Dawna's married name. Their address is 1404 South Spenser, Mesa, AZ 85204. I am fairly close to their two daughters Ruthie and Linda as we are about the same age. Dorothy and Frank "Bud" Koubik never were able to have children. Her address is 49365 Alpine Avenue North, Stanfield, Minesota. Her husband died in April 1992 of a heart attack during surgery for a hiatal hernia. She spent last winter with Ruth and Johnnie in Mesa, Arizona, and this year she is spending it with Curtis and his wife in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. I have one full brother and his name is Richard Ballard Hood, and he lives in New Ulm, Minnesota. His story is a little of that like Bob's in that he took off and no one knew where he was for nine years, and then suddenly he called me out of the blue. He and his third wife have lived in New Ulm since 1979. He and I talk on the telephone occasionally, but unfortunately we have very little in common anymore. I wound up raising his two sons from his first marriage part time from the age of 12 and full time when each of them turned 16. His oldest, Rick, is now 26 years old and drives truck for England Trucking out of Salt Lake City. He is thinking very seriously of getting married. The younger boy, Tim, is 24 years old and married with a baby that is almost a year old and another one on the way in May. He and his wife live in Salt Lake City. We see them quite often and their little boy is like a grandson to us. My mother was descended through the Gibbons and Wilhelm families. Both families were early Mormon pioneers and joined the Mormon church in its early days in the 1830s. They came west in the major migration during and after 1847. My great grandfather, Andrew Smith Gibbons, was one of the seven scouts that explored the best route for the first of the 1847 wagon trains to take. He was among the first group to enter the Salt Lake Valley in July 1847. However, he return to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he helped to guide other wagon trains west until 1853 when the Mormon settlers had to vacate the Indian land they were living on. He then moved his family to Salt Lake City then. Shortly after arriving in Salt Lake City, he was sent to southern Utah to help with Indian trouble because he apparently had such a calming effect on them. He and his family lived in 13 or 14 different communities in southern Utah, southern Nevada, and northern Arizona. Our family tradition says he planted nine peach orchards before he was able to harvest fruit from any of them that he planted. Just as he would get established, he would be sent into another area to calm the Indians. He and his sons finally settled in St. Johns, Arizona, in the northeastern part of the state. St. Johns is very close to both the Apache and Navajo Indian Reservations. In addition, he was one of the first three white men to visited the Hopi Indians in the village of Moencopi. Moencopi is the oldest continuously inhabited settlement in all of North America, because the Hopis have been there for centuries. Andrew Smith Gibbons life story was chronicled in a book by Helen Bay Gibbons called "Saint and Savage," published by Deseret Book. However, I understand it is no longer in print. The Gibbons family also got together in 1980 and published a family history called "The Turning of the Hearts," and starts with Andrew Smith Gibbons' father, William Davidson Gibbons. The only bad thing about the book is that it does not have an index and it was done before the days of PC computers. His son, Richard Gibbons, was my grandfather, and he too was one of the original Arizona pioneers. He was heavily involved in cleaning up the lawlessness that plagued Arizona into the 20th century. In fact, he was elected to the Territorial Legislature of 1901 and co-sponsored a bill that created the Arizona Rangers after the pattern of the Texas Rangers. Their community of St. Johns was on the route from areas like Tombstone to the Robber's Roost (of Butch Cassidy fame), and they were always being plagued by ruthless outlaws. I have 800 typewritten pages of his journals that go from 1888 to 1924 when he died. The Wilhelms' story is much the same. John Benjamin and Clarrisa Harding Wilhelm joined the Mormon church in Ohio in 1842 and started making plans to move to Nauvoo, Illinois. They arrived in Nauvoo on October 1, 1844 and stayed there in the winter of 1846 when the Mormons were forced to leave. Instead of going to Winter Quarters near Council Bluff, Iowa, as did most of those who were forced to leave, they went to Weston, Missouri, where Clarrisa ran a boarding house. Her husband was very ill and she stayed there until her husband died on March 8, 1851. She then took her children west by herself working as a cook on a wagon train to earn her passage. Her son, Bateman Haight Wilhelm married Lydia Hannah Draper, who was from another family who came west in the Mormon migration of 1847. Bateman and Lydia also lived all over southern Utah and northern Arizona. Their daughter, Clarrisa Isabell Wilhelm married my grandfather, Richard Gibbons, and their daughter, Amy Gibbons married my dad, Sam Hood. We have copied a great deal of this information that we have printed out from the computer and are sending it to you in a separate package. The research we have gathered that has already been done takes the Gibbons and Wilhelm families into colonial New England. Their roots go back to Massachusetts and Connecticut, while we have found the Hood-Lamb ancestors, apparently, go into colonial Virginia. I was born in Mesa, Arizona, on April 14, 1945, and lived there until Michael and I were married on March 25, 1967. We have lived in Tucson, Arizona; San Jos Costa Rica; Preston, Idaho; Idaho Falls, Idaho; Moab, Utah; Blanding, Utah; and Tremonton, Utah. We have been in Tremonton since December 1976. Our children's birth places sound a little like a travel log. Amy Jo was born in Costa Rica; Juliet was born in Rexburg, Idaho; Ruth was born in Moab, Utah; and Martin was born in Monticello, Utah. There were times I wondered if we would ever stop living the life of gypsies and settle down in one place, but we finally did. Well, I hope this answers some of your questions about my family. As I said we will make copies of the information we have and send it to you. Jody H. Jensen (801) 257-3652 __________ Part of a letter written to Darl from Jodi Jensen 326 South Tremont UT 84337 Darl, really enjoyed getting your letter, because it gives us a chance to sit down and finally put some of these things in writing. my dad's name, Samuel L. Green Hood. He always told the story that he was not given a name until he was six years old in 1895. Apparently a census taker came around and wanted the names of everyone that lived in Empire, Georgia. Dad always said he was a sickly child and his parents hadn't expected him to live so they just put off giving him a name. They called him "Hammer" and "Cowboy," but the census taker wouldn't let it go at that. He pulled out a list of names and had dad run his finger down them even though he couldn't read. Dad always said he stopped on the shortest name he could find, which was Sam. The name he chose was recorded as Samuel L. Green, who was a black doctor in that part of Georgia. Dad always refused to use the "L. Green" because he said it had belonged to a black man. What you have to understand is that Dad was born only 24 years after the Civil War ended, and he learned to shun anything that even hinted of being black. Dad and his father never did get along very well. Dad always said he was a very picky eater and at times just did not have much of an appetite because he didn't feel well. He said he could remember more than once his dad demanding that a plate of dirt be put before him if he refused to eat what was fixed. . . Jodi Jensen


RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.