Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Peter Beverley: Birth: 1668 in Jamestown, Middlesex County, Virginia. Death: 1728 in Beverley Hundred, Gloucester County, Virginia

  2. Robert Beverley: Birth: 1673 in Jamestown, Middlesex County, Virginia. Death: 21 Apr 1722 in "Beverley Park", King & Queen County, Virginia

  3. Harry Beverley: Birth: Abt 1674 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia. Death: 12 Feb 1731 in "Newlands", Spotsylvania County, Virginia

  4. Mary Beverley: Birth: Abt 1675 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia.


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Catherine Beverley: Birth: 1680 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia. Death: 1726

  2. Thomas Beverley: Birth: Abt 1680 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia. Death: 20 Sep 1686

  3. William Beverley: Birth: 4 Jan 1680 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia. Death: 22 Oct 1737 in Virginia

  4. Christopher Beverley: Birth: 19 Feb 1686 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia.

  5. John Beverley: Birth: 4 Jan 1687 in Blandfield Plantation, North of Tappahannock, Caret, Upper Essex County, Virginia.


Notes
a. Note:   NI3465
Note:   Major Robert Beverley &  Mary Whitby Keeble Emigration from England to Virginia 1663 Major Robert Beverley was born in 1641 in Beverley, Yorkshire, England, was christened on 5 Jan 1643 in St. Mary Lowgate, Hull, Yorkshire, England, died on 15 Mar 1687 in "Blandfield", Middlesex County, Virginia, and was buried on 19 Mar 1687 in Jamestown, Middlesex County, Virginia. Robert married Mary Whitby Keeble, daughter of  William Whitby  and  Ruth Gorsuch, on 1 Apr 1666 in Jamestown, Middlesex County, Virginia. Mary was born on 3 Jun 1637 in Hull, Yorkshire, England, died on 28 Jun 1678 in Jamestown, Middlesex County, Virginia, and was buried in Christ Church Parish, Middlesex County, Virginia Colony. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Name: Robert Beverley Year: 1687 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 8925 Primary Immigrant: Beverley, Robert Annotation: Alphabetical list of immigrants to Virginia, 1635-1800, from a variety of sources. Source Bibliography: STANARD, WILLIAM GLOVER. Some Emigrants to Virginia: Memoranda in Regard to Several Hundred Emigrants to Virginia during the Colonial Period Whose Parentage is Shown or Former Residence Indicated by Authentic Records. Richmond [Va.]: Bell Book and Stationery Co., 1911. 2nd ed., enl., 1915. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1983. 94p. Page: 14 U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: Robert Beverley Gender: Male Birth Place: EN Birth Year: 1641 Spouse Name: Mary Spouse Birth Year: 1637 Marriage State: of VA Number Pages: 1 Militia Commander of all Va. Member of the Council House of Burgess William Byrd, in his correspondence to Thomas Grendon, from Virginia wrote on May 20, 1684: "Major Beverly (sic) was tryed by this court for severall high crimes & misdemeanours and found gulty (sic) by the jury, but submitting himself on his knees at the barre was promis'd pardon on his future good behaviour." "Major Robert Beverly (sic) (c1641-1687) was a Cavalier. He emigrated to Virginia in 1663. In 1682, while serving as clerk of the House of Burgesses, he was arrested at the behest of some Council members because he refused to give up some House records without instructions. He was deprived of all offices and kept under arrest until May 4, 1684, when "by petition supplicating the bench, on his bended knees," his crime was remitted." BEVERLY, MAJ. ROBERT, (1630-85) Came from England in 1663. Settled in Middlesex Co. VA. House of Burgess, Commander of all Va. Militia 1675. Member of the Council. Married 1666 Mary Carter (1637-1678) and then Catherine Hone. Early Immigrants to Virginia from the 1500s and 1600s U.S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900 Name: Robert Beverley Gender: Male Birth Place: EN Birth Year: 1641 Spouse Name: Katherine Armistead Spouse Birth Place: VA Marriage Year: 1679 Marriage State: VA Number Pages: 1 Christ Church Parish, Virginia Marriages, 1653-1812 Name: Major Robert Beverley Spouse: Mrs Katherine Hone Marriage Date: 28 Mar 1679 Comment: was Married in Gloster Christ Church Parish, Virginia Deaths, 1653-1812 Name: Major Robert Beverley Death Date: 15 Mar 1686 Burial Date: 19 Mar 1686 Comment: of this parish Departed this Life Ancestry.com. Christ Church Parish, Virginia Deaths, 1653-1812 The Beverley's sold their land in Yorkshire to the Pennymen family about the time Robert Beverley came to Virginia. The Immigrant sent at least three of his sons back to England to school and as above stated, according to the Parish Register of St. Mary's in Hull, his son Thomas died there and was buried on the 14th of September, 1680. Burke's Landed Gentry Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 14 January 1673. 8200 acres on both side one of the great Swamps or maine runns of Mattaponie River. Inclusive patt. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 499 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 21 September 1674. New Kent County. Description: 600 acres on the North side Mattapony River, on the back of Mr. Mady, the said land being formerly due unto John Pigg by Patent 3rd day of Jany 1667. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 525 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 16 November 1674. New Kent County.  6500 acres. Grantee(s): Smith, Lawrence, Capt., and Beverly, Robert, Capt. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 547 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 21 September 1674. Rappahannock County (extinct). 3000 acres on the South side of Rappahannock River and on the South side of the main swamp of a mill, formerly Andrew Gilsons Mill. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 525 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 16 November 1674.  6500 acres. Rappahannock County (extinct). Grantee(s): Smith, Lawrence, Capt., and Beverly, Robert, Beverly, Robert , Capt. grantee. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 547 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 21 September 1674. Rappahannock County (extinct). Grantee(s): Beverly, Robert, Capt. and Barber, Richard. 600 acres on the South side Rappahannock County or river; and adjoining l and of Henry Jermaine, William Gray and Thomas Page. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 544 (Reel 6) . See also the following surname(s): Beverley. Burke's Landed Gentry says the Beverleys sold their land in Yorkshire to the Pennymen family about the time Robert Beverle y came to Virginia. "The Immigrant sent at least three of his sons back to England to school and as above stated, according to the Parish Register of St. Mary's in Hull, his son Thomas died there and was buried on the 14th of September, 1680. "From the position the Immigrant soon took in the Colony, and the offices he held, it is evident he was well educated for those days and a man of culture and attainments but so far as we know, the above fairly well sums up the evidence of his origin. WILL OF ROBERT BEVERLEY, of Middlesex County in Virginia, Gentl. 16th August 1686. Item I give & bequeath unto my eldest son Peter Beverley...all my land in Gloucester County Lying upon Peanketank River betwixt the creeks called Cheesecake Creek and Hoccadies alias Bayles Creek and adjoining to and including in a patent with 500 acres which (were) formerly by me sold and passed away to Mr. Mann of Gloster County by deed under my hand & seal but in case my said son Peter should happen to die without heirs of his body, my will is that the ...lands above (should go) to my second son Robert Beverley...Item I give to my second son Robert Beverley...my plantation & Devident of Land on Poropotank Creek Glouster County...920 Acres...To Harry Beverley 1600 acres in Rappahannock...To John 3000 acres in Rappahannock & New Kent...on the run commonly known...by the name of Beverley Park..to William Beverley 1 land in Middlesex on Rappahannock River...called Griffin's Neck adj. Mr. Robert Smith and Col. Christo; Wormeley & purchased of Mr. Thos. Elliot...To wife Catherine during her natural life...my plantation in Middlesex County...on Peankatanke River whereon I live...now called Old plantation 165 acres according to patent. Also all one half parte of 100 acres of Land & plantation in Gloster County or the whole if I happen to purchase same before my death commonly called and known by the name of North River quarter and now held in partnership betwixt by Brother Coll John Armistead...Provided by wife...accept same in full of...right of dower...After wife's decease I bequeath all the 3 sd plantations to...my daughter Catherine Beverley...I give to the child my wife now goes with be it male or female...all my other lands & plantations...not household goods at my dwelling plantation...for her life.. .then to daughters Mary and Catherine...all other property to be disposed in equal parts...betwixt my wife and children either in specifical kind or in money sterling...Wife Catherine executor. Signed, Robert Beverley ; witness, Ralph Wormley, Robert Smith, Willm Kitts, Walter Keeble, Thomas Ballard. Recorded, Middlesex, 4th April 1687." Old Churches Ministers, and Families of Virginia. No. XVIII. My father, Robert Beverley, married Miss Jane Taylor, of Mount Airy, Rich mond county. My grandfather, Robert Beverley, married Miss Maria Carter , of Sabine Hall. My great-grandfather, William Beverley, married Miss Elizabeth Bland,--the sister, I have heard, of the distinguished Colonel Richard Bland, of the Revolution. My great-great-grandfather, Robert Beverley, (the historian,) married Miss --- Byrd, of Westover, I have heard. His father--the first of the name in the Colony of Virginia--settled at Jamestown about the year 1660, and from thence moved to Middlesex county. He was a long time Clerk of the House of Burgesses, a lawyer by profession , and a prominent actor in Bacon's Rebellion, commanding, I think, the King's troops as major. I have never heard the name of the lady he married in Hull, England. I have heard she was the daughter of a merchant of that town. He brought her to Virginia with him. For a more particular account of this individual I must refer you to the third volume of Henning's " Statutes at Large," from page 541 to the end. You will there see an authentic account of some of his services and persecutions. You will also find in vol. viii. of the same work, page 127, an act which gives, I presume, the only true account of the male branch of the family now extant: the act was obtained by my grandfather for the purpose of changing an entail from an estate in Drysdale parish, King and Queen county, (where the historian lived and died,) to one of more value in Culpepper. Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 14 January 1673. 8200 acres on both side one of the great Swamps or maine runns of Mattapo nie River. Inclusive patt. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 499 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 21 September 1674. New Kent County. Description: 600 acres on the North side Mattapony River, on the back o f Mr. Mady, the said land being formerly due unto John Pigg by Patent 3r d day of Jany 1667. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 525 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 16 November 1674. New Kent County.  6500 acres. Grantee(s): Smith, Lawrence, Capt., and Beverly, Robert, Capt. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 547 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 21 September 1674. Rappahannock County (extinct). 3000 acres on the South side of Rappahannock River and on the South sid e of the main swamp of a mill, formerly Andrew Gilsons Mill. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 525 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 16 November 1674.  6500 acres. Rappahannock County (extinct). Grantee(s): Smith, Lawrence, Capt., and Beverly, Robert, Beverly, Robert , Capt. grantee. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 547 (Reel 6) . Beverly, Robert, Capt. grantee. 21 September 1674. Rappahannock County (extinct). Grantee(s): Beverly, Robert, Capt. and Barber, Richard. 600 acres on the South side Rappahannock County or river; and adjoining l and of Henry Jermaine, William Gray and Thomas Page. Land Office Patents No. 6, 1666-1679 (pt.1 & 2 p.1-692), p. 544 (Reel 6) . See also the following surname(s): Beverley. Hennings Statutes at Large, Vol. VIII, pp. 227-230 November 7th, 1766 -- George III An act to dock the entail of certain lands, whereof Robert Beverley, esquire, is seized, and for settling other lands of greater value to the sam e uses. I. WHEREAS Robert Beverley, the elder, of the county of Middlesex, gentleman, deceased, was in his life-time seized of a valuable estate in lands, commonly called and known by the name of Beverley Park, situate in the parish of Drysdale in the counties of King and Queen, and Caroline, containing seven thousand six hundred acres, and being so seized, by his last will and testament in writing, did devise unto his son, John Beverley, and to his heirs, forever, three thousand acres, part of the said seven thousand six hundred acres of land, and did devise other three thousand acres thereof, unto his son, Thomas Beverley, and to his heirs, for ever.  And whereas the said Robert Beverley was in his life-time seized of one other tract of twelve hundred acres of land, commonly called and know n by the name of the Plain, adjoining the said tract of seven thousand six hundred acres, and bounded as by the patents, relation being thereunto had, may more fully appear; and being so seized, did, by his last will and testament, give unto the child, whereof his wife was then ensient, be it male or female, and to it's heirs, for ever, all the residue of his lands and plantations, not specifically devised in his said will; and in case the said child should die without issue, or heirs of it's body, lawfully begotten, all such lands as were not by him, in his said will expressly given, and named, he gave unto his eldest son, Peter Beverley , and to his heirs male of his body, lawfully begotten; and for want of  uch heirs male of his body, then to his son, Robert Beverley, and to his heirs male, lawfully begotten; and for want of of such heirs male of his body, lawfully begotten, to his son William Beverley, and his heirs forever.  And whereas the child unborn, at the time of making the said will, proved a son, named Christopher, who, by virtue of the said will, becme seized of sixteen hundred acres, the surplus of the said seven thousand six hundred acres of land, and the said twelve hundred acres adjoining thereto, being the lands, not otherwise particularly disposed of by the said will, and died so seized without issue; and Peter Beverley, the first in remainder therin named, being before dead without issue male; William Beverley, esquire, eldest son and heir male of Robert Beverley, the second in remainder, entered into the said lands, and died seized thereof, leaving issue Robert Beverley, esquire, who is now seized thereof as tenant in tail male, and is also become seized in fee simple of the said six thousand acres, so devised to the sons, John and Thomas Beverley, as aforesaid.  And whereas the said Robert Beverley, the younger, is seized in fee simple of three thousand five hundred and fifty acres; it being one moiety of seven thousand one hundred acres of land, in the county of Culpeper, called and known by the name of Wakefield; and it will be greatly to the advantage of the said Robert Beverley, and his issue, if the said two thousand eight hundred acres of entailed lands, were vested in him in fee simple, it being contiguous to the six thousand acres aforesaid ; and the said three thousand five hundred and fifty acres of land, in the county of Culpeper, being of greater value, settled in tail male, in li eu thereof: And forasmuch as notice has been published in the several churches in the said parish of Drysdale three Sundays successively, that application would be made to this present general assembly, to dock the entail of the said two thousand eight hundred acres of land, in the counties of King and Queen, and Caroline, pursuant to your majesty's intructions: May it therefore please your most excellent majesty, at the humble suit of the said Robert Beverley, that it may be enacted; And be it enacted, by the Lieutenant-Governor, Council, and Burgesses, of this present General Assembly, and it is hereby enacted, by the authority of the same, That the said tract of land, containing two thousand eight hundred acres, in the parish of Drysdale, in the said counties of King and Queen, and Caroline, be, and the same are hereby vested in the said Robert Beverley, his heirs and assigns, for ever, to his and their own proper use. And that the said three thousand five hundred and fifty acres of land, called Wakefield, in the county of Culpeper, be, and the same is hereby vested in the said Robert Beverley, and the heirs male of his body, to pass, remain, and descend to all and every such person and persons, and for such estate or estates, and in such sort, manner, and form, as the said two thousand eight hundred acres would have reamined, gone, and descended, by virtue of the limitations, in the will of the said Robert Beverley, the elde r, if this act had never been made. II.  Saving to the king's most excellent majesty, his heirs and successors, and to all and every other person and persons, bodies politic and corporate, their respective heirs and successors, other than the persons claiming under the will of the said Robert Beverley, the elder, all such right, title, interest, claim, and demand, as they, every, or any of them, should or might have or claim, if this act had never been made. III.  Provided always, That the execution of this act shall be, and the same is hereby suspended until his majesty's approbation thereof shall be obtained. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Name: Robert Beverley Year: 1687 Place: Virginia Source Publication Code: 8925 Primary Immigrant: Beverley, Robert Annotation: Alphabetical list of immigrants to Virginia, 1635-1800, from a variety of sources. Source Bibliography: STANARD, WILLIAM GLOVER. Some Emigrants to Virginia: Memoranda in Regard to Several Hundred Emigrants to Virginia during the Colonial Period Whose Parentage is Shown or Former Residence Indicated by Authentic Records. Richmond [Va.]: Bell Book and Stationery Co., 1911. 2nd ed., enl., 1915. Reprinted by Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1983. 94p. Page: 14 Blandfield Plantation Mid-Georgian Mansion Blandfield is located on a breathtaking and vast acreage which borders the Rappahannock River, in Upper Essex County, north of Tappahannock. The original patent granted to Major Beverley, in 1683, included over 100,000 acres, which seems unfathomable to us today. The mansion is situated atop the ancient escarpment approximately one mile from the Rappahannock River, which can be seen in the distance. The mansion we see today is the second house built on the original land grant. The first home was built close to the river shore. Archaeological test digs still reveal bricks and foundation locations. Blandfield mansion was built by Major Beverley's great-grandson Robert, between 1769 and 1773 and was named in honor of Elizabeth Bland, the wife of William Beverley, the builder of the first house at Blandfield. The first house was located much closer to the river and vanished, long ago, from the landscape. Robert Beverley was educated in England, which obviously must have influenced him in the style of home that he would eventually build, back in Virginia, which was still a British colony at the time of Blandfield's construction. It is thought that the plans for Blandfield were adapted, by Robert Beverley, from specific plates in an influential 1728 book by English Architect James Gibbs. Drum House in Scotland has also been mentioned as a possible model for Blandfield. The plans of James Gibbs were inspired by the 16th century Italian Villa designs of Andrea Palladio. Palladian designs were focused upon entertaining guests by the wealthy of the period. Similarly, these plans were characterized by a five part plan which included flanking dependencies to house the kitchen and other essential service areas. These dependencies are connected to the main house by completely enclosed one-story corridors, know as hyphens. Robert Beverley, the builder of Blandfield was married to Maria Byrd Carter of Sabine Hall, which is located on the other side of the Rappahannock River, in Richmond County. The exterior of Blandfield is in keeping with its 18th century appearance, and has remained, for the most part, unchanged, with the exception of a screened porch added on the river side, during the 19th century. The interior of the mansion, underwent drastic alterations by William Beverley, grandson of the original builder, in the 1840s. William Beverley had the original 18th century woodwork from Blandfield removed from the house and redone in a very bland Greek Revival style. What his reasons for this are not known, however there has been much speculation over the years regarding his motivation. Perhaps he thought the woodwork was outdated or needed repair, or perhaps he thought that the elaborate woodwork presented a fire hazard as a portion of Mt. Airy's interior woodwork had previously burned. Could this have caused him to take such drastic action? We will never know his reasons, however, the interior wood work, as seen today, is more in keeping with Blandfield's original, more elaborate 18th century appearance. The restoration of Blandfield was accomplished over many years, under the direction of Architects and research specialists from the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation. For over one year, they patiently searched the house for any clues and fragments to guide them in their restoration of Blandfield's interior, back to its 18th century appearance. Their extensive on site research paid off as evidence was found of the original 18th century woodwork, including dimensions for all of the cornices. In the attic a complete inside shutter was also found and provided valuable information about Blandfield's operational interior shutters. As much glass as possible from the original 18th and 19th century window panes was also saved and reused during restoration. Robert Beverley must have been an extremely interesting, well spoken and confident man of great vision. He was a prolific writer and documenter, who went into great detail regarding the building, decorating and furnishing of Blandfield, which he included in his diary. In it he listed in great detail the materials and furnishings ordered for the house, which has been an invaluable tool in restoring Blandfield to her previous 18th century grandeur and majesty. Did he keep these notes solely for himself, or was he looking ahead to the future, preparing an inventory for the future generation or individuals who would one day restore his beloved Blandfield? The fabrics, wall coverings, interior woodwork, furnishings and window treatments that one can see at Blandfield today are all based on Robert Beverley's original notes. The Virginia Historical Society, Library of Virginia and the Essex County Library all contain volumes of information regarding the Beverley family and Blandfield's Builder \emdash  Robert Beverley. Blandfield's original 18th century kitchen is one of the very few remaining examples of kitchens during this period, in Virginia. It has been wonderfully restored and preserved. The kitchen contains an 8' fireplace, bread oven and the original cranes that the heavy iron kettles were suspended from. The hearth was also used for cooking in cast iron skillets. This dependency, contains two rooms on the first floor \emdash  the kitchen and a second smaller room for food preparation. Although the floors were originally dirt, bricks were laid in 1986. The second floor contains a very generously sized room and fireplace, where it is thought the chef or tutor may have lived. A secondary room upstairs was for the servants. The stairway to the upstairs is original and shows the wear characteristic of 300+ years of use. The Grand Hall is grand indeed, with dimensions of 25' x 30'. All ceilings on the first floor are 13 � feet high, above the floor. The wallpaper copied for use in the restoration of the Grand Hall is known as Pillars and Galleries. It was found by Colonial Williamsburg research staff, in the Library of Congress and provides a dramatic and stunning backdrop for the decorative arts and furnishings used in the Grand Hall. Although Blandfield is a home of massive and classically Georgian proportions, it is also a wonderfully welcoming place and a living record of Robert Beverley's vision. Blandfield is a family home that truly is capable of transporting one to another time.   North of Tappahannock, near Caret, is one of the most important and historically significant houses in Virginia and the nation. It is Blandfield, one of the most splendid mid-Georgian Tidewater Mansions dating from the Colonial Period, in Virginia. The mansion has been lovingly and meticulously restored by the Wheat family, in the spirit of its builder Robert Beverley. In 1983, Mr. and Mrs. James C. Wheat, Jr. purchased Blandfield, which had fallen into a state of disrepair, from Beverley family descendents. The purchase of Blandfield and the surrounding 3500 acres of pristine land, rescued Blandfield Plantation from commercial development at the hands of land speculators who wished to turn Blandfield and her lands into a Dutch owned resort Robert Beverley was educated in England, which obviously must have influenced him in the style of home that he would eventually build, back in Virginia, which was still a British colony at the time of Blandfield's construction. It is thought that the plans for Blandfield were adapted, by Robert Beverley, from specific plates in an influential 1728 book by English Architect James Gibbs. Drum House in Scotland has also been mentioned as a possible model for Blandfield. The plans of James Gibbs were inspired by the 16th century Italian Villa designs of Andrea Palladio. Palladian designs were focused upon entertaining guests by the wealthy of the period. Similarly, these plans were characterized by a five part plan which included flanking dependencies to house the kitchen and other essential service areas. These dependencies are connected to the main house by completely enclosed one-story corridors, know as hyphens. Robert Beverley, the builder of Blandfield was married to Maria Byrd Carter of Sabine Hall, which is located on the other side of the Rappahannock River, in Richmond County. Robert Beverley must have been an extremely interesting, well spoken and confident man of great vision. He was a prolific writer and documenter, who went into great detail regarding the building, decorating and furnishing of Blandfield, which he included in his diary. In it he listed in great detail the materials and furnishings ordered for the house, which has been an invaluable tool in restoring Blandfield to her previous 18th century grandeur and majesty. Did he keep these notes solely for himself, or was he looking ahead to the future, preparing an inventory for the future generation or individuals who would one day restore his beloved Blandfield? The fabrics, wall coverings, interior woodwork, furnishings and window treatments that one can see at Blandfield today are all based on Robert Beverley's original notes. The Virginia Historical Society, Library of Virginia and the Essex County Library all contain volumes of information regarding the Beverley family and Blandfield's Builder \emdash  Robert Beverley. thehouseandhomemagazine.com


RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.