Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Frances Poole: Birth: 27 OCT 1886 in Evanston, Cook Co., Illinois. Death: 8 OCT 1918 in Camp Ontario, Oswego, Oswego Co., New York

  2. Charles Henry Poole: Birth: 11 JAN 1888 in Evanston, Cook Co., Illinois. Death: 1 FEB 1942 in Boston, Suffolk Co., Massachusetts

  3. CLARENCE FREDERIC POOLE: Birth: 19 AUG 1891 in Evanston, Cook Co., Illinois. Death: 18 AUG 1957 in Evanston, Cook Co., Illinois

  4. Dorothy Poole: Birth: 14 DEC 1896 in Evanston, Cook Co., Illinois. Death: JUL 1965 in Polk Co., Florida


Sources
1. Title:   Poole, Charles H., Genealogical Records of the Poole Family & Particularly the Descendants of John Poole of Reading.... (1876)
Page:   p. 228
Name:   Ancestry.com
Givenname:   Ancestry.com
RepositoryId:   R2
Repository:   R5
CallNumber:   CS / 71 / C989 1889
2. Title:   Hurd, Harvey & Robert Sheppard, editors, Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois (Chicago: Munsell Pub. Co., 1906)
Page:   p. 639
Name:   FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah
Givenname:   FHL, Salt Lake City, Utah
RepositoryId:   R23
Repository:   R2
CallNumber:   F129 / K4 / K45 /1985
3. Title:   Goodspeed, W. & D. Healy, History of Cook County, Illinois.... (1909, Reprinted Salem, MA: Higginson Book Co., 1997)
Page:   pgs. 740-742
4. Title:   1870 U.S. Census
Name:   Ancestry.com
Givenname:   Ancestry.com
RepositoryId:   R2
Repository:   R5
CallNumber:   CS / 71 / C989 1889
5. Title:   1880 U.S. Census
Name:   Ancestry.com
Givenname:   Ancestry.com
RepositoryId:   R2
Repository:   R5
CallNumber:   CS / 71 / C989 1889
6. Title:   1900 U.S. Census
Name:   Ancestry.com
Givenname:   Ancestry.com
RepositoryId:   R2
Repository:   R5
CallNumber:   CS / 71 / C989 1889
7. Title:   1910 U.S. Census
8. Title:   City Directory
9. Title:   A. N. Waterman, Historical Review of Chicago and Cook County (N.p.: n.p., 1908).
Page:   pgs. 736-738
10. Title:   Obituary
11. Title:   Will
12. Title:   Death Certificate
13. Title:   Cemetery visit
14. Title:   Marriage certificate or license

Notes
a. Note:   Historical Review of Chicago and Cook County, by A. N. Waterman, 1908. vol. 2: 736-738 "Charles Clarence Poole, senior member of the firm Poole and Brown, was born in Benicia, California. November 27, 1856, and is a son of Charles H. and Mary A. (Daniels) Poole. His father was a native of Salem, Massachusetts, who was born in 1825 and died in Washington, District of Columbia, in the year 1880. Educated at West Point as a civil engineer, his entire life was passed in the service of the United States government. Charles H. Poole was a grandson of Manasseh Cutler, a chaplain in the colonial army during the Revolution, a member of the commission which founded Marietta. Ohio, and a leading agent in the passage of the Ordinance of 1787, receiving the honor of incorporating the anti-slavery provision. In later life he was a member of Congress from Massachusetts, and died at Hamilton, that state, in 1823. In a direct line Mr. Poole is descended from John Poole, of Reading, Massachusetts, who came to the colonies from England in 1632. Among his distinguished ancestors were also the early colonial Governors Dudley and Bradstreet, of the Old Bay state. As the father's profession kept the family much in Washington, Mr. Poole received his preliminary education in the public schools of that city, and, under private instruction, completed a course in civil engineering, so that when he was eighteen years old he secured employment in connection with surveys under the war department. He was thus engaged in 1874 and 1875, and relied upon the profession as a means of livelihood, more or less, while engaged in the study of law, both privately and as a student of the Columbian (now George Washington) Uni- versity. Mr. Poole graduated from that institution in 1882, having to his credit a prize essay on "Trade Marks." That year marks his admission to the bar, his coming to Chicago, and the commencement of his long active practice in the specialty in which he has become a leader. He is now recognized as one of the most successful patent lawyers in the country. In 1885 Mr. Poole formed a partnership with Major Taylor E. Brown, under the firm name of Poole and Brown, and their association has since continued to their mutual advantage. In 1891 the senior member was admitted to practice before the United States supreme court, in which tribunal much of their litigation is conducted. Mr. Poole's standing in his specialty is indicated by his recent presidency of the Chicago Patent Law Association. In 1884 C. Clarence Poole was united in marriage to Miss Anne, daughter of the late Dr. William F. Poole, author of Poole's Index to Periodical Literature, and librarian of the Chicago Public and Newberry libraries, and Mrs. Frances (Gleason) Poole. Mrs. Poole is a Massachusetts lady, born at Melrose, and is widely known and admired in Evanston society. Their family consists of Frances, Charles H., Clarence Frederick and Dorothy. Outside his home and his immediate circle of friends, Mr. Poole's social connections are chiefly with the Union League, Illinois Athletic and Chicago Literary clubs." ----------------------- Industrial Chicago: The Bench and Bar, Vol. VI Chicago : The Goodspeed Publishing Company, 1896 https://books.google.com/books?id=8xstAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA211&dq=poems+%22fitch+poole%22&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CDIQ6AEwBGoVChMIr67muJOLyQIVhDU-Ch1vXAz-#v=onepage&q=poems%20%22fitch%20poole%22&f=false pg. 210 "C. CLARENCE POOLE. Some details in the life and antecedents of this prominent patent attorney will be welcomed by all who have a real interest in the history of the bench and bar of Chicago. This city, the sesat of many important manufactures, the center of large publishing interests, and in whoses courts many celebrated cases arising from questions of ownership or violation of patents, trademarks and copyrights have been tried, has assumed an importance in such litigation second to that of no other manufacturing and commercial center in the country. Here there has grown up a class of patent lawyers as able as any in the world, one of the most reliable and most successful of whom is the gentleman to whosse career these paragraphs are devoted. pg. 211 Of Puritan lineage, Mr. Poole is a son of Charles Henry and Mary A. (Daniels) Poole and was born at Benicia, Cal., November 27, 1856. His father, a civil engineer by profession, was at the time in the service of the United States Government at that point. His mother was the daughter of Stephen Daniels, Esq., of Salem, Mass. The founder of the family in America was John Poole of Reading, Mass., who came to the Massachusetts colony in 1632, was one of the first settlers of Cambridge, and was later granted land at Reading, and became one of the principal citizens of that place. Mr. Poole is a lineal descendant of Governor Dudley and Governor Bradstreet of the Massachusetts Colony, and is a descendant also of Manasseh Cutler of Hamilton, Mass., a scholar and statesman, who graduated at Yale College, studie law and was admitted to the bar; studied, also, medicine and divinity; was a chaplain in the American Army and a noted patriot in the Revolution; was a long pastor of the church at Hamilton; achieved distinction by researces in botany and other scientific investigations; was chosen a director of the Ohio Company in 1787 and was the leading spirit in opening the Northwest Territory to sesttlement and the planting of the first colony in Ohio; was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the 'Ordinance of 1787,' by which slavery was excluded from the Northwest Territory, and was a member of Congress from Massachusetts. The family from which Mr. Poole comes has, in nearly all its branches and all generations, been noted for its scholarly tastes. Fitch Poole who was known as the 'Danvers Poet,' was his uncle, and Dr. William Frederick Poole, the distinguished librarian, author of 'Poole's Index,' and authority on New England history, and until his recent lamented death librarian of the Newberry Library in this city, was his cousin. Mr. Poole early displayed a talent for mechanical studies, which he has since utilized in the practice of patent law, a department of legal work for which his abilities especially quality him. His early studies were in the schools of Washington, D. D., and later he was fitted for the practice of civil engineering by studies unter private instructors, and in 1874 and 1875 served as assistant engineer in surveys carried on by the Engineer Department of the army. Among the records sof the War Department are a set of maps and plans for a projected canal from Cumberland, Md., to Pittsburg, Pa., which were made by Mr. Poole from notes taken in the field before he was nineteen years old. Mr. Poole, also, by private instruction fitted himself for entering the higher classes of one of the principal Eastern universities, with a view of attending the same for a short time and taking a degree, but not being able to carry out this project, and intending to devote his attention to patent law, he entered the law school of the Columbian University at Washington, where he was graduated in 1882, taking a prize for an essay on 'Trademarks' at his graduation. In the fall of that year he came to Chicago, which he deemed to be a good field for the particular practice upon which he had determined to enter. He was first associated Melville F. Dayton, well known to the legal fraaternity as a mechanical expert in court cases involving mechanical questions, in practice before the United States Patent Office, and later, also, in legal work, with Taylor E. Brown. Mr. Poole, during his practice of patent law, has acquired a high reputation for skill and ability, both in the work of procuring patents and in the conduct of patent litigation, and he has been employed as counsesl in many important cases both in the Patent Office and in the courts. His field of effort has not been confined to Chicago, but he has been called upon to represent important interests in many suits brought in other parts of the country. Mr. Poole married, in 1884, at Chicago, Anne Poole, daughter of the late Dr. William Frederick Poole, librarian of the Newberry Library, and since his marriage has lived at Evanston. pg. 212 Mr. Poole is literary in his tastes, and is a member of the Chicago Literary Club, of which the late Professor David Swing was an interested and active member, and which includes among its membership the best among Chicago's able and scholarly men. He has contributed occasionally to the columns of newspapers and periodicals articles on various topics, and has also contributed to the literature of his profession papers on special subjects, some of which have been prepared for and published by the Patent Law Association, an organization which embraces among its members all lawyers of prominence in this branch of legal profession in Chicago. Moreover, Mr. Poole is now, and for some time past has been, engaged in the writing of a treatise or text book, soon to be published, treating exhaustively of the law relating to the validity of letters patent as affected by the application for the patent and proceedings in the Patent Office prior to the grant. This work Mr. Poole is especially qualified to prepare, by reason of his extended experience in the matters treated of, and it promises, according to the judgment of patent lawyers who know of its intended character and scope, to be one of the most valuable contributions yet made to the literature of this branch of the law." ---------------------------- From: "History of Cook County, Illinois...." by Goodspeed, W. & Healy, D., 1909. Reprinted Salem, MA: Higginson Book Co., 1997. Pp. 740-742. "C. Clarence Poole, one of the capable patent lawyers of Chicago, and a member of the law firm of Poole & Brown, is of Puritan lineage, and a son of Charles H. and Mary A. (Daniels) Poole. He was born at Benicia. California, November 27, 1856. His father, a civil engineer by profession, was at the time in the service of the United States government at that point. The founder of the family in America was John Poole, of Reading, Massachusetts, who come to the Massachusetts colony in 1632, was one of the first settlers of Cambridge, and was later granted land at Reading and become one of the principal citizens of that place. Mr. Poole is a lineal descendant of Governor Dudley and Governor Bradstreet of the Massachusetts colony, and is a descendant, also of Manasseh Cutler, of Hamilton, Massachusetts a scholar and statesman, a chaplain of the American army and a noted patriot in the Revolution; was a director of the Ohio company in 1787 and was the leading spirit in opening the Northwest territory to settlement; was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the "Ordinance of 1787," by which slavery was excluded from the Northwest territory, and was a member of Congress from Massachusetts. Mr. Poole early displayed a talent for mechanical studies, which he has since utilized in the practice of patent law, a department of legal work for which his abilities especially quality him. His early studies were in the schools of Washington, D.C., and later he was fitted for practice of civil engineering by studies under private instruction, and in 1874 and 1875 served as assistant engineer in surveys carried on the Engineer Department of the army. Among the records of the War Department are a set of maps and plans for a projected canal from Cumberland, Maryland to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which were made by Mr. Poole from notes taken in the field before he was 19 years old. Intending to devote his attention to patent law, he entered the law school of the Columbian University at Washington, where he was graduated in 1882, taking a prize for an essay on "Trademarks" at his graduation. The fall of that year he came to Chicago, and was first associated with Melville E. Dayton, well known to the legal fraternity as a mechanical expert in court cases involving mechanical questions, in practice before the United States Patent office, and later, also, in legal work with Col. Taylor E. Brown, with whom he is at present associated. Mr. Poole, during his practice of patent law, has acquired a high reputation for skill and ability in his special line of practice, and he has been an advocate in many important cases, both in the Patent office and in the courts. He was married in 1884 to Anne Poole, daughter of the late Dr. William Frederick Poole, for many years librarian of the Newberry library, and since his marriage has lived at Evanston. Mr. Poole is a member of the Chicago Literary club, which includes among its membership the best among Chicago's able and scholarly men. He has contributed occasionally to the columns of newspapers and periodicals articles on various topics, and has also contributed to the literature of his profession papers on special subjects, some of which have been prepared for and published by the Patent Law association, and has also written a valuable text book, treating exhaustively of the law relating to the validity of letters patent as affected by the application for the patent and proceedings in the patent office prior to the grant." --------------------- http://books.google.com/books?id=aBYVAAAAYAAJ&q=poole#v=snippet&q=poole&f=false https://archive.org/stream/chicagoitshistor05curr#page/138/mode/2up/search/frances+gleason Pgs. 138-141. CHARLES CLARENCE POOLE. Nice photo too. The Poole family is distinctively American in both lineal and collateral lines since John Poole came from England in 1632 and established his home at Reading, Massachusetts. Among the distinguished ancestors, to whom the present generation point with pride, were the early colonial Governors Dudley and Bradstreet, who presided over the interests of Massachusetts ere the establishment of American independence. Another of the ancestors in the maternal line was Manasseh Cutler, who served as a chaplain in the colonial army during the Revolutionary war. He afterward became a member of the commission which obtained on behalf of the soldiers of that war the lands in Ohio on which was founded the town of Marietta, and was a leading agent in the passage of the ordinance of 1787, into which he incorporated the anti-slavery provision. He afterward represented Massachusetts in congress and died in Hamilton, that state, in 1823, having left the impress of his individuality upon many events which constitute important chapters in the history of the state and nation. Charles H. Poole was born in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1825, and while receiving his education at West Point, became a civil engineer and passed his entire life in the service of the United States government. His duties called him much of the time to Washington, D. C, where he passed away in the year 1880. His wife bore the maiden name of Mary A- Daniels and they were residents of Benicia, California, at the time of the birth of Charles Clarence Poole on the 27th of November, 1856. The youthful days of C. C. Poole, however, were largely .spent in the nation's capital, to which his father had been called in professional service. He, therefore, attended the public schools of that city and under private instruction completed a course in civil engineering, whereby he was qualified to take a position as civil engineer and topographical draftsman in connection with surveys under the war department when but eighteen years of age. To that work he devoted his attention in 1874 and 1875, and later was employed in the topographical division of the post office department. This line of work, however, he regarded merely as an initial step, having determined upon the practice of law as a life work. His preparation for the bar was made through private study and also as a student in the Columbian, now the George Washington, University. Even at that day he was greatly interested in subjects allied to patent law and his essay on trade-marks won him a prize at the time of his graduation in the class of 1882. The same year he was admitted to the bar and located for practice in Chicago, where he has since remained. No dreary novitiate awaited him and yet advancement at the bar is proverbially slow. However, he soon gave proof of his ability, and his constantly developing powers have long kept him in a positions of leadership among the patent lawyers of the country. Hav ing a natural aptitude for mechanical subjects, he preferred to concentrate his energies upon this department of the law, which all the time is growing more and more involved through the complexity of business interests, when a lack of knowledge or unscrupulous principles are continuously bringing about litigation in the courts concerning the validity of patents, copyrights and trade-marks. The patent lawyer must possess not only a knowledge of the law as it appears from the statutes, but must also have practical understanding of mechanical engineering and of the many subjects which find classification along manufacturing and industrial lines, that he may intelligently present the matters in his charge to the patent office and the courts. Lacking in none of the requisites of the successful patent lawyer, Mr. Poole has made continuous progress in his especial field. In 1885 he became the senior partner of the firm of Poole & Brown and has since been continuously associated with Colonel Taylor E. Brown, of the Illinois National Guard, the firm being recognized as one of the strongest patent law firms in the United States. In 1891 Mr. Poole was admitted to practice before the United States supreme court. He has been honored with the presidency of the Chicago Patent Law Association, which indicates clearly his standing among those who are his colleagues and associates in this field. Mr. Poole's club relations are with the Union League Club. He has been greatly interested in the Masonic order, and is a past commander of Evanston Commandery, Knights Templar and also a member of Medina Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Poole has always been an enthusiast in field sports and he is an expert fisherman with rod and reel. Mr. Poole maintains his residence at Evanston, where the family is well known in the social circles of that attractive suburb. He was married in January in 1884 to Miss Anne Poole, a daughter of the late Dr. William F. Poole, at one time librarian of the Newberry Library and the author of Poole's Index to Periodical Literature. Her mother bore the maiden name of Frances Gleason. Mrs* C. Clarence Poole is a native of Melrose, Massachusetts. The family numbers two sons and two daughters, Frances, Charles H., Clarence Frederick and Dorothy. A man of well balanced capacities and powers, capable of taking an impartial view of any question and of discriminating between the essential and the non-essential, his strongly marked characteristics have been the salient features in a commendable and notable success. Fortunate in possessing ability and character that inspired confidence in others, the simple weight of his character and ability has carriel him into important relations with large interests in his work in the United States patent office and the federal courts, where the involved questions of patent law are considered. ________________________ Will of Charles Clarence Poole, dated February 11, 1912 at Evanston, Cook Co., Illinois. File #22330 filed Dec. 22, 1914. Docket 147. Page 246. Received by Probate Div. March, 1999, 59 xerox pages, Cost $29.00 Abstract by Barbara B. Poole. Bequeath to foster sister, Elizabeth S. Poole, spinster, of Washington, D.C., $2,000. To wife, Annie, all the rest and residue of property or estate. If he (Charles) survives his wife, to son Charles Henry Poole he receives his orchard lands, two lots in Beaumont, Riverside Co., California and $6,000; to dau. Frances, house and the lands at 1015 Forest Avenue, Evanston, Illinois (apparently she already received $4,000); to dau. Dorothy, house and the lands at 937 Forest Avenue, Evanston, Illinois and $4,000; to son, Clarence Frederick, house and the lands at 939 Forest Avenue, Evanston, Illinois and $4,000. Witnesses selected by Charles were: Horace S. Poole, 1117 Main Street, Evanston, Illinois Florence D. Poole, 1117 Main Street, Evanston, Illinois Leah A. Dennis, 1441 Bluff Street, Dubuque illinois (for deposition, she lived in Evanston, Illinois. ____ Other bits of information. Annie, Charles Henry, Clarence Frederic, Frances and Dorothy Poole all resided at 795 Lincoln Avenue, Winnetka, Cook Co., Illinois on December 15, 1914. On Jan. 4, 1916 they all lived at 1631 Huirmou Avenue, Evanston, Illinois. Part of his estate was his law library located at his office at 1301-5 Marquette Building, Chicago. A Horace S. Poole signed a deposition on Fec. 17, 1914 as to knowing Charles Clarence Poole. (Horace was a first cousin of Charles.) Horace was married to Florence D. Poole and they lived at 1117 Main St., Evanston, Illinois. Both were witnesses to his will, signed Feb. 11, 1912. _____________ Chicago: its History and its Builders, a century of marvelous growth, Volume 5 By Josiah Seymour Currey Pgs. 138-141. Great photo as well. http://books.google.com/books?pg=PA141&lpg=PA138&dq=%22CHARLES+CLARENCE+POOLE%22&sig=BeheFUBcsZix5l5VLQHQ79HqfxM&ei=xS8zTevDH8X6lweW06y_Cg&ct=result&id=aBYVAAAAYAAJ&ots=goN2ifRzGx#v=onepage&q=%22CHARLES%20CLARENCE%20POOLE%22&f=false CHARLES CLARENCE POOLE. The Poole family is distinctively American in both lineal and collateral lines since John Poole came from England in 1632 and established his home at Reading, Massachusetts. Among the distinguished ancestors, to whom the present generation point with pride, were the early colonial Governors Dudley and Bradstreet, who presided over the interests of Massachusetts ere the establishment of American independence. Another of the ancestors in the maternal line was Manasseh Cutler, who served as a chaplain in the colonial army during the Revolutionary war. He afterward became a member of the commission which obtained on behalf of the soldiers of that war the lands in Ohio on which was founded the town of Marietta, and was a leading agent in the passage of the ordinance of 1787, into which he incorporated the anti-slavery provision. He afterward represented Massachusetts in congress and died in Hamilton, that state, in 1823, having left the impress of his individuality upon many events which constitute important chapters in the history of the state and nation. Charles H. Poole was born in Salem, Massachusetts, in 1825, and while receiving his education at West Point, became a civil engineer and passed his entire life in the service of the United States government. His duties called him much of the time to Washington, D. C, where he passed away in the year 1880. His wife bore the maiden name of Mary A- Daniels and they were residents of Benicia, California, at the time of the birth of Charles Clarence Poole on the 27th of November, 1856. The youthful days of C. C. Poole, however, were largely .spent in the nation's capital, to which his father had been called in professional service. He, therefore, attended the public schools of that city and under private instruction completed a course in civil engineering, whereby he was qualified to take a position as civil engineer and topographical draftsman in connection with surveys under the war department when but eighteen years of age. To that work he devoted his attention in 1874 and 1875, and later was employed in the topographical division of the post office department. This line of work, however, he regarded merely as an initial step, having determined upon the practice of law as a life work. His preparation for the bar was made through private study and also as a student in the Columbian, now the George Washington, University. Even at that day he was greatly interested in subjects allied to patent law and his essay on trade-marks won him a prize at the time of his graduation in the class of 1882. The same year he was admitted to the bar and located for practice in Chicago, where he has since remained. No dreary novitiate awaited him and yet advancement at the bar is proverbially slow. However, he soon gave proof of his ability, and his constantly developing powers have long kept him in a positions of leadership among the patent lawyers of the country. Hav ing a natural aptitude for mechanical subjects, he preferred to concentrate his energies upon this department of the law, which all the time is growing more and more involved through the complexity of business interests, when a lack of knowledge or unscrupulous principles are continuously bringing about litigation in the courts concerning the validity of patents, copyrights and trade-marks. The patent lawyer must possess not only a knowledge of the law as it appears from the statutes, but must also have practical understanding of mechanical engineering and of the many subjects which find classification along manufacturing and industrial lines, that he may intelligently present the matters in his charge to the patent office and the courts. Lacking in none of the requisites of the successful patent lawyer, Mr. Poole has made continuous progress in his especial field. In 1885 he became the senior partner of the firm of Poole & Brown and has since been continuously associated with Colonel Taylor E. Brown, of the Illinois National Guard, the firm being recognized as one of the strongest patent law firms in the United States. In 1891 Mr. Poole was admitted to practice before the United States supreme court. He has been honored with the presidency of the Chicago Patent Law Association, which indicates clearly his standing among those who are his colleagues and associates in this field. Mr. Poole's club relations are with the Union League Club. He has been greatly interested in the Masonic order, and is a past commander of Evanston Commandery, Knights Templar and also a member of Medina Temple of the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Poole has always been an enthusiast in field sports and he is an expert fisherman with rod and reel. Mr. Poole maintains his residence at Evanston, where the family is well known in the social circles of that attractive suburb. He was married in January in 1884 to Miss Anne Poole, a daughter of the late Dr. William F. Poole, at one time librarian of the Newberry Library and the author of Poole's Index to Periodical Literature. Her mother bore the maiden name of Frances Gleason. Mrs C. Clarence Poole is a native of Melrose, Massachusetts. The family numbers two sons and two daughters, Frances, Charles H., Clarence Frederick and Dorothy. A man of well balanced capacities and powers, capable of taking an impartial view of any question and of discriminating between the essential and the non-essential, his strongly marked characteristics have been the salient features in a commendable and notable success. Fortunate in possessing ability and character that inspired confidence in others, the simple weight of his character and ability has carriel him into important relations with large interests in his work in the United States patent office and the federal courts, where the involved questions of patent law are considered. GEORGE H. WEAVER, M. D. _______________ Death certificate from LDS. https://www.familysearch.org/s/recordDetails/show?uri=http://pilot.familysearch.org/records/trk:/fsrs/rr_836516658/p1&hash=HloWXpZgU9zB10k5M56iYku8TUc%253D


RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.