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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. ANDRIES TEN EYCK: Birth: Bapt. 30 Sep 1750 in Readington, Hunterdon Co., New Jersey.

  2. Arian \ Ariantie \ Arrianna Ten Eyck: Birth: 31 MAY 1755 in Raritan, Somerset Co., New Jersey. Death: 15 JAN 1806 in Maryland, Otsego Co., New York

  3. HENDRICK TEN EYCK: Birth: ABT 4 MAR 1759 in New Jersey. Death: 23 JAN 1816 in Dunham, Brome-Missisquoi Regional County Municipality, Quebec, Canada

  4. Maria \ Mary Ten Eyck: Birth: ABT 27 NOV 1763 in Raritan, Somerset Co., New Jersey. Death: 2 MAR 1830 in Montgomery Co., New York

  5. George Ten Eyck: Birth: 11 MAR 1769 in Readington, Somerset Co., New Jersey. Death: 28 MAR 1813 in Greenbush, Rensselaer Co., New York


Family
Marriage:
Sources
1. Title:   George, Henry W., New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 63, "The Ten Eyck Family in New York" (1932)
2. Title:   Centinneal Committee, Dunham, Histoire de Dunham (Pub: Les Ateliers Jacques Gaudet Ltee, 1967)
3. Title:   Dunham 1867 - 1992 (Anniversary Book) (Pub. Editions Louis Bilodeau & Fils Ltee, Sherbrook, Quebec 1992)
4. Title:   Thomas, C., Contributions to the History of the Eastern Townships (Montreal: Printed by John Lovell, 1866)
5. Title:   Ellis, Margaret, Ten Eyck Lineage Papers (Missisquoi Historical Society, Stanbridge E., Quebec, Canada)
6. Title:   Lower Canada Declarations of Aliens
7. Title:   Land records for the Province of Quebec, Aug. 1788 - 14 July 1806 ([Sainte-Foy, Québec] : Archives nationales du Québec, 1990)
8. Title:   Wright, F. Edward & Pamela S. Pearson, Colonial Families of New Jersey (Lewes, Delaware : Colonial Roots, 2004-2007)
9. Title:   United Empire Loyalists Centennial Committee, The Old United Empire Loyalists List (Baltimore: Genealogical Pub. Co., 1984).
10. Title:   The Atlantic Canadians 1600-1900 An Alphabetized Directory of the People, Places and Vital Dates, Edited by Noel Montgomery Elliot, Vol. 3, Pub. by The Genealogical Research Library.
Page:   pg. 3269
11. Title:   Loyalists and Land Settlement in Nova Scotia, A List complied by Marion Gilroy, Public Archives of Nova Scotia, Publication No. 4, Pub. 1990
Page:   pg. 36
12. Title:   Whereabouts of Some American Refugees, 1784-1800: The Nova Scotian Land Grants by Clifford Neal Smith, British-American Genealogical Research, #12, Part 5, Westland Pub., McNeal, Arizona, 1992
Page:   pg. 26
13. Title:   A Geography and History of the County of Digby, Nova Scotia by Isaiah W. Wilson, Pub. Halifax, N. S. by Holloway Bros., Printers, 1900
Page:   pgs. 64-66
14. Title:   Will
15. Title:   Nelson, William, New Jersey Marriage Records 1665-1800 (Genealogical Pub. Co., Inc., 1982 (reprint of 1900 book)

Notes
a. Note:   http://100objects.qahn.org/content/loyalist-coat-c-1770 From: The New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 58, 1932, The Ten Eyck Family in New York by Henry W. George-- He was a Loyalist and left New Jersey during the Revolution and settled in Albany County, NY. After the revolution, he removed to Dunham, Canada. Lower Canada Declarations of Aliens (Film # CS, 88, Q4, L69, 1981) #21--I Andres Tenneyck Do hereby declare that I am a native of the United States of America from the State of New Jersey my age is Sixty Seven Years and my trade or occupation is that of a farmer that for these Six Months Last Past. I have resided at Normans Kill in the State of New York and came into this Province of Lower Canada by water on Lake Champlain on the tenth day of June 1794 and now do reside in Dunham as Witness my hand at Missisquoi Bay this Twenty Fifth Day of October 1794. Signed: Andres Tenneyck Note from Barbara B. Poole: From: Gazetteer of the State of NY by Horatio Spafford, reprinted 1981: "Norman's Kill, a good sized millstream, that enters the W. bank of the Hudson in Bethlehem, 2 1/2 miles S. of Albany. It rises in the SW of Schenectady County, and pursues a devious course through Duanesburgh, Princetown, Guilderlandt, and Bethlehem, in all about 23 miles, having received some small branches from Knox, Berne, and the NW part of Albany...." I believe the father and son went to Nova Scotia in 1784 and lived there for a period, then returned to New York. The father, ANDRES / ANDREW Sr. at age 67 removed to Dunham -- see above declaration. From The Old United Empire Loyalists List by Milton Rubincam, F.A.S.G., Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1984 Page 264 "TenEyck, Andrew residence: Kingston, Soldier Jersey Volunteers. ANDREW TEN EYCH, Jr. 1784, ANN County, Digby Township, Escheated in 1800. _______________ From: Segments of Missisquoi & Historical Society Reports, Vol. 17, 1882. The TenEyck Red Coat, by Margaret J. Ellis, Page 129 -- "This is the story of one of the oldest articles in the Museum, namely, a British Army Red Coat which was worn by HENDRICK TenEyck during the American Revolution to avoid being pressed into the British Army. "The first TenEyck to come to Canada was ANDRES or ANDREW had been a member of the New Jersey Volunteers and after the revolution found life very difficult for himself and his family in the new republic. One of the persecutions he suffered for being loyal to George III was being arrested and carried on board an American craft that was lying off New York harbor and was ready to sail on the following morning as a privateer. During that night, Andres and another man, with the aid of ropes, let themselves down into the water and started to swim to the New Jersey shore three-fourths of a mile away, but were quickly discovered by the ship's crew, who commenced firing at them at close range tearing up the water around them. ANDRES escaped to the shore, where he waited for his companion, whose fate was never known. After this ANDRES left New Jersey and moved to upper New York State and then to Canada a few years later. (See declaration of 1794 above) "When the Township of Dunham was erected in 1796 and granted to Thomas Dunn, as Leader, and 34 Associates the names of ANDREW and HENRY TenEyck are both numbered as Associates. This brings us to Hendrick, son of Andres, who followed his father to Canada in 1795, I quote from Cyrus Thomas (History of the Eastern Townships, 1866) "During the revolution Hendrick lived in the city of New York. While there he was obliged to resort to stratagem to prevent being pressed into the British naval service by press-gangs. Knowing that soldiers were exempt from impressment, he obtained a red coat and wore it, thus preserving himself from the cluthces of the press-man. This coat, in a remarkable state of preservation considering its age, is still in the possession of his grandchildren who reside on the homestead in Dunham," (Note, now in the Missisquoi Museum.) From Cyrus Thomas: "Mr. TenEyck drove to Canada four cows and a yoke of oxen, for which he procured pasturage on a neigbouring beaver meadow. In winter, he sustained them with browse." "This destitute place mentioned above was on one of the lots of 200 acres granted to the TenEycks in 1798. They are situated on the road now called 'TenEyck Road' at Meig's Corner, between Meig's Corner, between Dunham and Stanbridge East." "ANDREW lived only four years after coming to Canada, dying in 1798, and I am reasonably sure that he is buried in the TenEyck Cemetery, not far from the road on what was his farm. His son, HENRY, died in 1815 and he, too is probably buried there. There are 28 tombstones there, the earliest is 1827 and the last 1923." _________________ From The Loyalists of the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Missisquoi Historical Society, 1984. Article: The TenEyck Family by Margaret Ellis. Pp. 142-144. Article similar to that which she wrote for above book. There is a picture of the Red Coat at the Museum and a chair they brought to Canada. Page 144--"I have a few articles they brought with them, which I treasure. These include a pair of wooden shoes, a Dutch pipe, a Bible written in Dutch, containing genealogy dating from 1748-1775 of the Dumont family. Hendrick's wife was Janette Dumont. I also have a large, finely woven handkerchief with the name of Janette's mother (Brachie Dumont) whose dates are 1725-1790. The original TenEyck Bible, at the time the TenEyck Family Tree was compiled many years ago by my grandfather Earle K. Bishop, was in the possession of Mrs. Catharine Sager, a descendant of Coenraedt, who was then living in Coscakie, New Jersey." ______________ The below was taken from: Contributions to the History of the Eastern Townships by Cyrus Thomas, 1866. The index of this book may be seen HERE. https://books.google.com/books?id=gjEPAQAAMAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false (page 110) "Dunham is ten miles square. it is bounded on the north by East Farnham, east by Brome and Sutton, south by St. Armand, and west by Stanbridge. It was erected into a township, and the greater portion of it granted to a Company of "Associates," in 1796; the first of the townships erected in Lower Canada." My direct ancestors, James Pell, Andrew Ten Eyck and Henry Ten Eyck are included in the list of names of the grantees. (page 112)--"Among those who first sought a home in this township was Mr. Andrew TenEyck, from New Jersey. Born and bred beneath the fostering care of Great Britain, and taught to respect and love her institution, (page 113) he could not book the idea of renouncing, with his neighbors, allegiance to George the Third, and par consequent, received the ignoble title--that in country--of Tory. For several years after the close of the revolution, the loyal old Dutchman--much to his disrelish--continued to live in New Jersey, and witness the practical workings of a republican government; but finally declaring that he could no longer endure it, in 1793 or '94 he came to Canada, and settled in the south-western part of Dunham, on a lot now owned by Andrew TenEyck his great grandson. But the temporal happiness which this faithful loyalist had sought in Canada was not of long duration; he died in 1799. A year after he came to this Province, he was followed by one of his sons, named Hendrick, who had inherited his father's love for the British Lion. He settled on a lot adjoining that of his father. During the revolution he lived in the city of New York. While there he was obliged to resort to stratagem to prevent being pressed into the British naval service, by press-gangs. Knowing that the soldiers were exempt from impressment, he obtained a red coat and wore it, thus preserving himself from the clutches of the press-man. This coat, in a remarkable state of (page 114) preservation considering its age, is still in the possession of his grand-children, who reside on the homestead in Dunham. Mr. Ten Eyck drove to Canada four cows and a yoke, for which he procured pasturage on a neighboring beaver-meadow. In winter he sustained them with browse. So destitute was this place at the time of every appearance of civilization, that a tuft of Timothy grass which sprung up by a stump, the summer after his arrival, afforded a cheering sight. It was first discovered by Mrs. Ten Eyck, who, in surprise, immediately called here husband to see it. Hendrick Ten Eyck came into possession of his father's lot after his death; and though his health was considerably impaired, he effected large improvements on these two lots. He had a wen on his face, from which he had long suffered, and, continually increasing in size, it put an end to his life, in 1815. He was an honest, industrious man, and at his death was comfortably situated with regard to this world's goods. He had seven children--three sons and four daughters. Two of the sons died while very young; the remaining one was drafted during the war of 1812, and was one of those taken prisoner by the Americans. (page 115) He was carried to Greenbush, N. Y., where he died, in the twenty-third year of his age. Three of the daughters settled in Dunham, and one in Stanbridge. One of those who settled in Dunham married a cousin, named Andrew Ten Eyck, and remained on the homestead. He died in 1832. His widow and her children still own the home of their father." ------------------------- From: Rovers, Rebels and Royalists, Missisquoi Historical Society Report, Vol. 18, 1984. All Saint's Church, Dunham, by Margaret Ellis, Page 116 -- In 1808 a new minister moved to Dunham, "For two years he boarded at the home of Andrew TenEyck in a two room house where eight people lived besides himself. The ANDREW TenEyck house is south of the present house of JOHN TenEyck, nearby in the TenEyck Cemetery are to be found the graves of the early TenEycks, including Andrew and his son Hendrick." _______________ From: Compendium of Early Mohawk Valley Families, Maryly B. Penrose, C.G., A.S.I., Vol. 2, Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. 1990. Page 112 Andrew was in Canajoharie with 4 in family. Andrew was in Caughnawago with 5 in family. From: Missisquoi County Historical Society 4th Annual Report of 1908-1909, Page 34: Andre Teneyck received lots: 24, 25, 26, 28 Henry Teneyck received lots: 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 12, 13 (I am not sure if Andre was the father of Henry or his brother.) ----------- Petition of Andrew TenEick in behalf of himself and his two sons Andrew & Henry for 1200 acres of land each in the township of Clifton. St. Armand, Oct. 7, 1797. #251. Document on Pgs. 91282-91287. (Includes why he left America & depositions from friends.) ___________________________ Histoire de Dunham, Prob. by Centinneal Committee, Dunham, prob. ed. by Margaret J. Ellis, Pub: Les Ateliers Jacques Gaudet Ltee, 1967. Pp. 11, 15, 17. __________________________ History of the Eastern Townships, Province of Quebec, Dominion of Canada : civil and descriptive, by C. M. Day Originally published: Montreal: John Lovell, 1869, Reprinted, 1992 Pages 292-293 "DUNHAM A tract of land lying within the district of Montreal, containing 57,252 acres, 3 roods, and 30 perches, bounded north by Farnham, east by Brome and Sutton, south by St. Armand, and west by Stanbridge, was erected into a township named Dunham. The petition for this grant was dated April 28th, 1795; the warrant of survey issued August 27th of the same year; and in 1795, the township was granted to Thomas Dunn and his associates, viz., Joseph Buck, John Heliker, Jacob Heliker, George Saxe, Mathew Hall, William Ferrand, David Ferrand, Joshua Chambers, Amos Woodland, David Reychart, John Clark, Thomas Best, Daniel Mills, Jeremiah Reychart, Daniel Trever, Alexander McDougall, Thomas Pell, Andrew Ten Eyck, Henry Ten Eyck, Archibald Henderson, Henry Hall, Elisha Dickinson, Jacob Best sen., George Waymore, Abraham Lampman, John Mills, Stephen Jenner, Jacob Best jun., Adam Deal, Frederick Streit, Samuel Mills, Philip Ruiter, and Jacob Ruiter. It is said that Dunham was the first township erected in Lower Canada. Among the earliest inhabitants if not the very first to locate within its limits, was Andrew Ten Eyck from New Jersey, who settled in the south-western part of the tract, in 1793. He was a U. E. Loyalist, and came to Canada as the forerunner of a numerous influx of the same class of settlers." _______________ From: Wright, F. Edward & Pamela S. Pearson, Colonial Families of New Jersey, (Lewes, Delaware : Colonial Roots, 2004-2007). Page 109. "The Ten Eick (Ten Eyck) Family" "Andries Ten Eyck was a Loyalist who left NJ during the Revolution and settled in Albany Co., NY. After the Revolution he settled in Dunham, Canada, where he received a grant of land." ___________________________________________________________________ From Heather Darch [email protected] (Nov. 22, 2011) Good morning Barbara, Thank you for your interest in the Ten Eyck Red Coat. It is a fascinating artefact and over the years since the museum obtained it from Mrs. Ellis, there has been a lot of study on it by myself and Revolutionary War experts. The cut of the coat is what makes it a particular mystery as it reflects an earlier time period than the late 1770s era. It is also free of any accessories such as cuffs and collars very typical of the Revolutionary War coats. A great deal of searching has been done on the first owner Andres Ten Eyck as well and his military records are a little unclear. So the provenance of the coat and its date of fabrication was widened to allow me and researchers other avenues of study and possibility. Andres Ten Eyck appears in earlier records than the Revolutionary War so there is a very strong possibility that the coat was made during the French-Indian Wars of the late 1750s -1760s a decade earlier. The style of the coat suggests this is a possibility. I have dismissed the oral legend that was attached to the coat for many years that Andres Ten Eyck wore the coat to avoid being pressed into military service by the British Navy. The military records that have been uncovered reveal that he was very much in favour of the King's army and served in good faith in the King's service and did not avoid active service. His true story is much more fascinating than the "press-gang" story.I have included below some of my own research notes. As for the spoons, I shall make a note to myself to send you an image. With any quotes and references please include my name and title (Curator) and the "Missisquoi Historical Society/Missisquoi Museum" which owns all the intellectual property created on its behalf. Best Regards, Heather Darch Andres Ten Eyck was born circa 1727 in New Jersey. In 1753 he was appointed an officer in the “Nova Caesarea Militia” (known later as the New Jersey Militia) by His Excellency Jonathan Belcher (1681/2-1757), Governor of the Province of New Jersey from 1747 to 1757. On June 3, 1757 the New Jersey Militia was formed to protect the frontier from the French and their native allies. There were no uniforms to give the soldiers, nor proper equipment to accouter them. They fought and served in their first campaigns in the clothing they brought from home. Each man who joined was provided a salary but was required to equip himself with a musket, powder horn, a hatchet, blanket, knapsack and coat. Andres Ten Eyck was appointed Capitaine-adjutant of the militia and was active in the service until 1763 in the conflict known as the “French and Indian War” (or The Seven Years War) against the French and their native allies. It is believed that the red coat Andres Ten Eyck wore was from his time serving in the New Jersey militia from 1757-1763. In 1770 Ten Eyck moved with his family to New York and by 1776 received a commission as a captain for the purpose of raising a company under James Houghton. Before the Provincial Regiment could be raised however, James Houghton was captured by American rebels and charged with treason and executed. Ten Eyck was able to destroy the documentation linking him to Houghton but he was arrested on suspicion of treason and imprisoned in Albany New York. In 1777, he was transferred to the Fleet Prison at Esopus Landing, New York and put on board a prison ship anchored in the Hudson River. On October 8, 1777, all prisoners aboard the Fleet Prison were sent to Hartford, CT. Some prisoners escaped en route including Andres Ten Eyck. He was able to swim to shore despite being fired upon by American rebels and eluded capture by hiding in the woods for almost one year. His property and most of his belongings were seized by the Americans and at the conclusion of the war in 1783; Ten Eyck had little choice but to immigrate to Nova Scotia along with 34,000 other Loyalist refugees. Here he did not receive the compensation that was promised to all people who remained loyal to King George III and returned briefly to New York where he learned about the opportunity to claim land for Loyalists in Lower Canada. Andres Ten Eyck’s name first appeared as a Loyalist refugee in Lower Canada in 1794 on a petition for Crown land and again in 1797. Both petitions were sent from St. Armand (Missisquoi Bay) Quebec. Later that same year, Ten Eyck was listed as an associate under land agent Thomas Dunn in the Township of Dunham. He died in 1798 and was buried on his property in Dunham Quebec. The cemetery is under the protection of the Missisquoi Historical Society but unfortunately the original stone for Andres Ten Eyck no longer exists." --------------- Lower Canada Declarations of Aliens (located at N.E.H.G.S. under CS / 88 / Q4 / L69) #21--I Andres Tenneyck Do hereby declare that I am a native of the United States of America from the State of New Jersey my age is Sixty Seven Years and my trade or occupation is that of a farmer that for these Six Months Last Past. I have resided at Normans Kill in the State of New York and came into this Province of Lower Canada by water on Lake Champlain on the tenth day of June 1794 and now do reside in Dunham as Witness my hand at Missisquoi Bay this Twenty Fifth Day of October 1794. Signed: Andres Tenneyck Land Records for the Province of Quebec (1788-1867) from LDS Film #1723570 For Dunham, 1795 Page 12: Andres Teneick, Henry Teneick Page 15: Andres Teneick, Henry Teneick Page 19: Andres Teneick, Henry Teneick Lower Canada Land Index Petitions (located at N.E.H.G.S. under CS / 88 / Q4 / L5) Page 58: List of Applications for Land Page 60: #251 Andrew Teneic in behalf of himself and his sons Andrew & Henry. Page 735: Lists of Townships and Persons names who have been admitted under orders from the Executive Council Office to take the oaths. Page 738: Township of Dunham: #22 Andrew TenEyck #34 Hendrick TenEyck Page 1631: Hinchinbrook Andrew TenEic Jr. and Henry TenEic each received 200 acres (Andrew lot # 37 and Henry lot # 38) Page 2331: Township of Hinchinbrook #251 Two sons of Andrew TenEick NB The petitions of the above mentioned persons were laid on the table by Govr. Prescott a few days before his departure for England and have since been reported on by a committee of the whole council the 31st December 1799. Page 2334: Township of Clifton #251 Andrew TenEick and Sara or Jane (very hard to read writing) Page 2343: Clifton #251 Andrew TenEick Page 2361: Hinchinbrook Andrew Teneic Jr. Henry Teneic Barbara Adams Bishop E-mail: [email protected]" [email protected] July 17, 2001 Page 4522: Council Chamber Quebec, Tuesday, 31st December 1799 Page 4529: #251 On the petition of Andrew Teneic the Committee recommended that the report of the Land Committee be confirmed. Page 17,983: A Return of Persons names who have taken the oaths and Subscribed the Declaration required by Law before the Commission at Missisquoi Bay from 26th January 25th April, 1795. Page 17,984 Date when your signature was made Feb. 2nd Names Andrew Ten Eyck Place from where they came Dunham Township or place in which they intend to settle as Associates Dunham Page 29,826: Return of the persons names who have taken the oaths and made & signed the Declaration required by law before the Committee at Missisquoi Bay from 26th Jan. to 25th April, 1795. N.1 March 23rd Hendrick TenEick S. N. York (hard to read) Dunham
b. Note:   Lower Canada Land Papers, Austin, Nicolas - Austin Nicolas and others RG 1L 3L Vol. 35 Home Discover the Collection Land Records Land Petitions of Lower Canada, 1764-1841 Image pgs. 17, 983, 17,984 http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/land/land-petitions-lower-canada-1764-1841/Pages/image.aspx?Image=e003705006&URLjpg=http%3a%2f%2fcentral.bac-lac.gc.ca%2f.item%2f%3fid%3de003705006%26op%3dimg&Ecopy=e003705006 ------------------------------------- pgs. 91279-91287 Given Name(s): Andrew Surname: TENEICK Year: 1797 Volume: 191 Page: 91279-91287 Microfilm Reel Number: C-2565 Reference: RG 1 L3L Item Number: 84997 http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/discover/land/land-petitions-lower-canada-1764-1841/Pages/image.aspx?Image=e008738463&URLjpg=http%3a%2f%2fcentral.bac-lac.gc.ca%2f.item%2f%3fid%3de008738463%26op%3dimg&Ecopy=e008738463


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