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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Rose Platt: Birth: 1865 in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI. Death: 26 NOV 1957 in Reedsburg, Sauk Co., WI

  2. Charles Gregory Platt: Birth: 8 JUN 1868 in Sauk Co., WI. Death: 14 SEP 1917 in Chicago, Cook Co., IL

  3. Anna Louise Platt: Birth: 1870 in Sauk Co., WI. Death: 1944 in Sauk Co., WI

  4. Julia C. Platt: Birth: 1873 in Sauk Co., WI. Death: 15 MAY 1958 in Sauk Co., WI

  5. Henry Richard Platt: Birth: 20 NOV 1877 in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI. Death: 26 Feb 1943-in Doubt may be 1950+ in Sauk Co., WI

  6. Gertrude Pearl Platt: Birth: 1883 in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI. Death: 1954/55 in Baraboo, Sauk Co., WI

  7. Olga Platt: Birth: 1887 in Sauk Co., WI. Death: 1888 Age 8 months in Sauk Co., WI


Sources
1. Title:   GEDCOM file imported on 19 Aug 2000.
2. Title:   GEDCOM file imported on 23 Jun 2000.

Notes
a. Note:   92: "When we first came to Baraboo, Cheek's Hill was all woods," Mrs Platt recalled. {NOTE: Cheeks Hill is just north of 8th Street in Baraboo extending from about Center Street on the west to East Street on the east.} She came to Sauk County from Ohio with her parents in 1851,making the entire trip by steamboat. They followed the Ohio River to St Louisand then came up the Mississippi River to the Wisconsin River. They were supposed to stop at Galena, Illinois, for a while but, because of an epidemic of cholera on their boat, they were not allowed to land. At Dubuque, Iowa, they transferred to a smaller boat. The trip was nearly turned into a tragedy when a settler tried to kidnap an older sisterof Mary's as they were going from one boat to another. The sister wasrescued by her father and uncles. The cholera epidemic grew so bad that many pioneer children died during the trip. Shortly after the ship landedat what is now Sauk City, Wisconsin, two of Mary's younger sisters died.The boat captain was also stricken with cholera before the vessel reached Portage, Wisconsin, about 20 miles up the river. Mary also recalled that when the railroad came to Baraboo in 1871there was a grand celebration in the city. The railroad company formed an excursion of Baraboo people to Madison, Wisconsin. The passenger allrode on flat cars the 40 miles to Madison and were not charged any fare. From Mary Platt's obituary: Besides her own seven children, Marybrought up two boys in the home, Thomas and Donald Hood, and a girl, MaryPlatt, niece of her husband.Walnut Hill Cem. She was instrumental in thefounding of St. Johns Congregation Lutheran Church. The firstservices were held in her home. Later services were held in theso-called institute building. For most of her life he was a very robust person, she only sufferedsun-stroke and for a time later in her life suffered with inflammatoryrheumatism.
Note:   From a newspaper interview of Mary (Zimmerly) Platt when she was age
b. Note:   on January 7, 1843 at Pohaten Point, Ohio, as the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Zimmerly.As an infant she received the sacrament of Holy Baptism, and on ,during the course of her youth, was instructed in the work of God and confirmed in the Luthern faith. When she was eight years ofage, her parents with their family, left Ohio and came to Wisconsin bySteam boat, seeking a new home. They followed the Ohio River to St.Louis and then came up the Mississippi River to the Wisconsin River.They were supposed to stop at Galena, Illinois for a while but becauseof an epidemic of chilera on ther boat, they were not allowed to land.At Dubuque, Iowa they transferred to a smaller boat. A settler triedto kidnap an older sister of Mary's as they were going from one boatto another. The sister was rescued by her father and uncles.This tripwas saddened by the loss of two of two of their children, who werestricken with cholera and died on the way shortly after they landed atSauk City, Wisconsin. The boat captain was also stricken with cholerabefore the vessel reached Portage Wisconsin, about 20 miles up river.. Here in Wisconsin, the family settled on a plot of land in SaukCounty on the so-called Happy Hill, south of North Freedom, and beganthe task of hewing a farm out of the wilderness. Here the deceased spent heryouth and did her full share in helping her parents create a homestead When she was twenty-one years of age, on April 7, 1864 she was marriedto Mr. Ludwig Platt of Baraboo, a harness maker by trade. The couplesettled in the city after their marriage, and in February 1864purchased a home on Seventh Avenue, which remained the home of the seven children, two of which have preceded their mother in death, adaughter, Olga dying in infancy at the age of eight months and anadult son, Charles, who died in September 1917. Her husband died onthe 20th of April, 1904. Besides her own children, she, the deceased,brought up two boys in the home, Thomas and Donald Hood, and a girl, a niece of her husband, Mary Platt. During the course of her whole life, she took an active interest in the affairs of her community, and especially of her church. Indeed she was instrumental in the founding of our St. John's Congregation; for it was through her efforts and upon her invitation that an itinerant Lutheran Paster was induced to come to this place and to hold services here, the first of which was held in her home. Later on the congregation organized, and services were held for a time in the so-called Institute Building. She was a faithful attendant of the services of the con- gregation until she was well into the nineties in age. when the feeble of high old age forbade her attendance. As far as I have been able to determine, the last of the founders of our congregation has been called to the heavenly rest. In spite of the fact that she reached a high old age, the deceased during the course of her whole life was never a very robust person, and during her younger years and the years of middle-age was in rather delicate health. She had suffered a sun-stroke and for a time was ailing with inflammatory rheumatism. During her declining years, which she spend under the tencder care of her daughter, Julia, who made her home with her mother, she was rather well though feeble. Her mind remained clear and active ;until the very last. She was taken ill on Sunday and on Wednesday morning her condition had much improved, and it was thought that she might again be spared. She died rather suddenly, but peacefully and quietly, on Wednesday noon, August 31, 1938 in the faith of that Savior whom she had confessed all her life. A few hours before her death she had received the sacra- ment of Holy Communion. Her age came to ninethy-five years, seven months, twenty-four days. She is survived by one son, Henry Platt of Baraboo, and four daughters, Miss ross Platt, Mrs. Anna Grosinske, Mrs.Gertrude Spangenberg and Miss Julia and nineteen great grandchildrenand many more distant relatives. Mary Platt had the distinction of having had a ride on the first railroad train to come into Baraboo. The railroad company gave folks a ride to Madison and back; they had a picnic on the Capital gronds. The train was a flat-car with planks for seats. on 1 From a newspaper interview oMariana Elizabethf" Mary" (Zimmerly)Platt when she was age 92: "When we first came to Baraboo, Cheek's Hill was all woods," Mrs Platt recalled. {NOTE: Cheeks Hill is just north of 8th Street in Baraboo extending from about Center Street on the west to East Street on the east.} She came to Sauk County from Ohio with her parents in 1851,making the entire trip by steamboat. They followed the Ohio River to St Louisand then came up the Mississippi River to the Wisconsin River. They were supposed to stop at Galena, Illinois, for a while but, because of an epidemic of cholera on their boat, they were not allowed to land. At Dubuque, Iowa, they transferred to a smaller boat. The trip was nearly turned into a tragedy when a settler tried to kidnap an older sisterof Mary's as they were going from one boat to another. The sister wasrescued by her father and uncles. The cholera epidemic grew so bad that many pioneer children died during the trip. Shortly after the ship landedat what is now Sauk City, Wisconsin, two of Mary's younger sisters died.The boat captain was also stricken with cholera before the vessel reached Portage, Wisconsin, about 20 miles up the river.
Note:   Mrs. Mariana elizabeth Ploatt, commonly known as mary Platt, was born
c. Note:   Wednesday Noon Aug 31st 1938.


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