Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Elizabeth Channing Moore: Birth: ABT 1774 in <, , New York, USA>. Death: ABT 1774

  2. Eliza Elliott Moore: Birth: ABT 1776 in , , New York, USA.

  3. Townsend Moore: Birth: ABT 1779 in , , New York, USA.

  4. John Moore: Birth: ABT 1782 in , , New York, USA.

  5. Maria Seabury Moore: Birth: ABT 1785 in , , New York, USA. Death: ABT 1785

  6. Maria Seabury Moore: Birth: ABT 1787 in , , New York, USA. Death: BEF 1815 in , , New York, USA

  7. Lydia Hubbard Moore: Birth: ABT 1790 in <, , New York, USA>.

  8. Thomas William Channing Moore: Birth: 1793 in , , New York, USA. Death: 1873

  9. Frances Childs Moore: Birth: AFT 1793 in <, , New York, USA>.


Notes
a. Note:   !BIRTH: 1746 New York, N.Y. !PARENTS' FAMILY MRIN: # # 35 MOORE, Thomas II RIN57/Elizabeth CHANNING RIN58 !MARRIAGE: 1773 possibly Poughkeepsie NY home of bride's parents. !DEATH: 1828 !SOURCE(S): Page 41 - SIX CENTURIES OF MOOR DE FALLEY by David Moore HALL, printed 1904 by O.E. FLANHART Printing Co., Richmond, VA. !CITATION(1): The following is a copy of the above source: John MOORE, Esq., of New York, (1746-1828), Genealogist, Member of New York Chamber of Commerce in 1768; Freeman of the City in 1769; Deputy Collector of his Majesty's Customs and Quit Rents and Greenwich Hospital; Deputy Naval Offic- er; Deputy Supt. of the port; Assistant Commissary General and Examiner of Stoppages for the Army and all the Staff and Departments; Deputy Secretary of the Province, (1765-1783), m. in 1773 Judith, daughter of James LIVINGSTON, Esq., of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and Judity, daughter of Adonijah NEW- COMB, eSQ., and his wife, eighth child of Gilbert LIVING- STON, Esq., of co. Chester, N. Y., and Cornelia BEEKMAN, his wife, son of Robert of "Livingston Manor," (1651-1728), Speaker of the Provincial Assembly, 1818-25, and Alida, daughter of Philip Pierterse VAN SCHUYLER, of Albany, N. Y., his wife, great-great-great-great-great grandson of William LIVINGSTON, Esq., of Kilsyth, Scotland, and Lady Mary ERS- KINE, his wife, who was the granddaughter of James DOUGLAS, bARON dalkeith AND Earl of Morton, ( -1458), and Princess Janet STUART, his wife. Issue. 1-Elizabeth CHANNING, d. inf. 2-Eliza Elliott m. to Alfred LIVINGSTON, Esq. 3-Twonsend, d. unm. 4-John. 5- Maria Seabury d. inf. 6-Maria Seabury II m. to Rev. David MOORE, D. D. (his 1st wife). 7-Lydia Hubbard. 8-Thomas William Channing I, (1793-1873), unm. "Old Cousin Tom," we were wont to call him. What a stream of memopries, sweet childish memories, his name evokes! Can we forget him who never forgot his juvenile kindred, but made glad their hearts, not once but always, when his travels brought him to old Virginia. His portrait appears in the picture of the interior of the Park Theatre in the History of New York City, in the library of the Penn. Hist. Society. He spent much time in genealogical research and was a steadfast friend of Fitz-Greene HALLECK. Peace to his ashes! 9- Frances Childs. Moore supra. !CITATION(2): TERRI BRADSHAW O'NEILL (kon646@@airmail.net) ***** really neat bit of information I just got in response to a letter to the New York Historical Society. This will probably fall under the category of "Research". I can't recall having seen in the back issues of Moore News anyone mentioning being connected to the family of Dr. Clement Clarke Moore of New York City, the author of "A Visit from St. Nicholas", aka "The Night Before Christmas". As you know, I descend from the family of Col. John Moore (1686-1749) of NYC through his son, Stephen Moore. Well, Stephen was the 17th of 18 children and he had an older brother named Thomas. Thomas had a large family, too. Thomas's oldest son, John, was the author of the memoirs that all of our Moore's family history is based on. Two other sons of Thomas entered the clergy, most notably Richard Channing Moore who became the Bishop of Virginia in 1814. The other one was the Rev. Thomas Lambert Moore, who was the Rector of St. George's, S. Hempstead, Long Island. He married Judith Moore, the sister of Dr. Benjamin Moore, Bishop of New York and thus, the aunt of Clement Clarke Moore, son of Benjamin. The two Moore lines united by this marriage between Thomas Lambert & Judith were in no other way related. Now, back to Thomas's oldest son, John, the author of the memoirs: he had a son, Thomas William Channing Moore who was a member of the New York Historical Society, and in fact, donated his father's memoirs to that Society, along with some other papers of his father's and the key to a painting called "Interior of the Park Theatre, 1822". The painting depicted a great many of New York's Knickerbocker society, and the key identified them. In 1862, when Thomas William Channing Moore presented much of this material to the NYHS, he wrote a letter to the librarian of the Society, George H. Moore (no relation as far as I can tell), which stated, in part: "I have the pleasure to inform you that Dr. Clement C. Moore has been so kind as to comply with my request (made at your suggestion) to furnish, for the Archives of our Society, an autograph copy of his justly celebrated 'Visit from St. Nicholas'-I now enclose to you. "...In an interview that I had yesterday with Dr. Moore, he told me that a portly, rubicund Dutchman, living in the neighborhood of his father's country seat, Chelsea, suggested to him the idea of making St. Nicholas the hero of this 'Christmas piece' for his children." Signed, T.W.C.Moore At the time this letter was written (1862), Clement Clarke Moore was in his 80's and had written the poem 40 years before for his two daughters. A relative had sent the poem to the newspaper in Troy, NY, which I believe, published it in 1824. To think that one of our Moores was even peripherally connected to this wonderful story is thrilling. Wouldn't it be fun to learn the identity of the "portly, rubicund Dutchman" who served as the model for St. Nick? Maybe it's already been done.


RootsWeb.com is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. The creator of each GEDCOM is solely responsible for its content.