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Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Solomon Clodfelter: Birth: 26 NOV 1807 in North Carolina. Death: 4 MAR 1889

  2. Elizabeth Clodfelter: Birth: 1 APR 1810. Death: 17 MAR 1889 in buried in Sutherlin Cemetery (see notes for father)

  3. David Clodfelter: Birth: 1 JUN 1812. Death: 1889 in IA

  4. William Clodfelter: Birth: ABT. 1815. Death: ABT. 1896 in OR

  5. Mathias Clodfelter: Birth: 2 DEC 1817. Death: 9 NOV 1881 in buried in Oak Hill Cemetary, Crawfordsville, IN

  6. Sarah Clodfelter: Birth: 20 MAR 1820. Death: 3 JAN 1859 in buried in Seceder Cemetary; now Portland Mills Cem.

  7. Noah Clodfelter: Birth: 21 FEB 1823 in Davidson County, North Carolina. Death: 8 APR 1856 in buried in Sutherlin Cemetery (see notes for father)

  8. John Clodfelter: Birth: 22 OCT 1825. Death: 6 NOV 1862 in buried in Benton Barracks, MO near St. Louis


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Solomon Clodfelter: Birth: 26 NOV 1807 in North Carolina. Death: 4 MAR 1889

  2. Elizabeth Clodfelter: Birth: 1 APR 1810. Death: 17 MAR 1889 in buried in Sutherlin Cemetery (see notes for father)

  3. David Clodfelter: Birth: 1 JUN 1812. Death: 1889 in IA

  4. Nathan William Clodfelter: Birth: 28 MAY 1815. Death: in Iowa?

  5. Mathias Clodfelter: Birth: 2 DEC 1817. Death: 9 NOV 1881 in buried in Oak Hill Cemetary, Crawfordsville, IN

  6. Sarah Clodfelter: Birth: 20 MAR 1820. Death: 3 JAN 1859 in buried in Seceder Cemetary; now Portland Mills Cem.

  7. Noah Clodfelter: Birth: 21 FEB 1823 in Davidson County, North Carolina. Death: 8 APR 1856 in buried in Sutherlin Cemetery (see notes for father)

  8. John Clodfelter: Birth: 22 OCT 1825. Death: 6 NOV 1862 in buried in Benton Barracks, MO near St. Louis

  9. Catherine Clodfelter: Birth: 29 JUN 1828. Death: 23 JAN 1864


Sources
1. Title:   World Family Tree Vol. 8, Ed. 1
Page:   Tree #1736
Author:   Br´┐Żderbund Software, Inc.
Publication:   Release date: January 12, 1997

Notes
a. Note:   Following taken from "Through the Years with the Clodfelters, 1750 - 1939" by Beulah Crodian Yochum:
  Let us take ourselves, then, to Abbott's Creek in North Carolina to the home of John Clodfelter. It was the summer of 1830 and a letter had been received from two families, former neighbors, who had moved to far away Indiana the previous year. The letter described their location as west of Indianapolis near Prtland Mills on Raccoon Creek [now in Putnam county]. It was a likely place with fertile soil and suitable climate for agriculture. The women of the family need not fear Indians or wild animals as neither had been of any trouble. .... So the John Clodfelter family and the family of Mrs. Clodfelter's brother, the Bowers family, soon started by covered wagon up through the Shenandoah Valley until they finally struck the Cumberland Trail which has now become National Highway No. 40. ....
 Just how many weeks were required for this trip we do not know. Our grandfather, Solomon Clodfelter, was at that time twenty-three years old, and as the oldest son of the family it became his duty to ride the lead horse of a team of three horses which were hitched to the covered wagon. His father, John, walked most of the time and drove the extra stock that was being taken along with them. ....
 At the end of two or three months they reached the small village of Indianapolis and inquired the way to Portland Mills. They were informed that Portland Mills was a thriving town about fifty miles farther west with a good grist mill, a tannery, and stores where salt, calico and other necessary supplies could be bought. Goods were brought up Big Raccoon Creek on flat boats from trading posts along the Wabash River. So the weary travelers must have felt their new home was near and hurried a bit more at this news! They came on down the trail to Putnamville (a stop on the stage route where that all important letter had been mailed to them in the spring) turned north to Greencastle, continued northwest through what is now Morton, until they reached Raccoon Creek. By this time they were in the right vicinity and started looking for a place where they could live. After crossing the stream near the site of the present covered bridge, they found a cabin a short distance to the north which was not in use. It was here that they spent their first night as Indiana settlers, and this cabin became the family home until a permanent one could be established. John Clodfelter later entered eighty acres of land, which laid just north of the cabin, and there another house was built which we all know and shall refer to as the Old Home Place.
 That winter without doubt must have been a strenous one for the entire family with all of the duties of establishing a home and getting a living for a family of eleven out of a wilderness. We recall that history tells us the winter of 1830 was one of the coldest with fiercest blizzards ever known. They all seemed to withstnad the ordeals except the father [John]. He became very ill with a deep cold late in the winter and never regained his health. He passed away August 19, 1831. The mother, Katherine Clodfelter [Catherine], took up the burden of maintaining the home for her family, and did so with the help of her older sons. She spent the rest of her life at this home place and did not pass away until 1856. ....
 John Clodfelter was buried on the Jesse Fordyce farm in Russell Township, evidently a place where one of the first cemetaries was started but was not continued. ....
 John's wife .... was buried in the Sutherlin cemetary, which is an old graveyard but has always been well kept.
 ========================================================================== ====================== Cemetary location identified in "Clodfelter Pioneer Days" by H. Clodfelter and M. Romine, 1995, page 170.
 ========================================================================== ========================


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