Individual Page


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Amos Huguley: Birth: 18 Aug 1828 in Metasville, Wilkes County, Georgia. Death: Bef. 1830 in Metasville, Wilkes County, Georgia

  2. William Henderson Huguley: Birth: 12 Sep 1830 in Metasville, Wilkes County, Georgia. Death: 4 Jun 1917 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  3. Orrie Huguley: Birth: 12 Aug 1832 in Metasville, Wilkes County, Georgia. Death: 27 Aug 1849 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama

  4. Frances Alley Huguley: Birth: 22 Oct 1834 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia. Death: Bef. 1850

  5. Mary Eugenia Huguley: Birth: 19 Sep 1836 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia. Death: 29 Sep 1920 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  6. George Whitfield Huguley: Birth: 1 Aug 1838 in Troup County, Georgia. Death: 17 Aug 1887 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  7. Rosaline Copander Huguley: Birth: 19 Aug 1843 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia. Death: 15 May 1875

  8. Josephine Bertha Huguley: Birth: 18 Nov 1845 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia. Death: 20 Jul 1873

  9. Infant Huguley: Birth: 1847 in Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 1847 in Chambers County, Alabama

  10. Zachariah Huguley: Birth: 1848 in Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 1848 in Chambers County, Alabama

  11. Infant Huguley: Birth: 21 Aug 1850 in Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 21 Aug 1850 in Chambers County, Alabama


Family
Marriage: Children:
  1. Ida S. Huguley: Birth: 17 May 1853 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 2 Jun 1870 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  2. Infant Huguley: Birth: 1854 in Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 1854 in Chambers County, Alabama

  3. Amos Clinton Huguley: Birth: 8 Jan 1855 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 11 Jun 1884 in Chambers County, Alabama

  4. Ada Alice Huguley: Birth: 1856 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 19 Dec 1939 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  5. Elizabeth Huguley: Birth: 1858 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama.

  6. Lillian L. Huguley: Birth: 5 Nov 1859 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 8 Nov 1872 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  7. Annie W. Huguley: Birth: 16 May 1864 in LaFayette, Chambers County, Alabama. Death: 25 Oct 1872 in West Point, Troup County, Georgia

  8. Person Not Viewable


Notes
a. Note:   REFN: 3203 "George Huguley, Founder of First Valley Cotton Mill" by Floyd Tillery
 copied from "The Huguleys - Who Are We?" The Chattahooche Valley owes a
 great debt to a great pioneer of the past. George Huguley was born in
 Wilkes County, Georgia on January 27, 1809 to Jobe and Alley (Lay)
 Huguley. George Huguley's family was a large one, so he has many direct
 descendants living in the Valley today. This pioneer Valley industrialist moved to Troup County about the year of 1833. The Indian
 Springs Treaty with the Creek Indians was signed in 1825.
 Left fatherless when he was a child, George Huguley learned early to shift for himself. He "entered" a small tract of land in Troup County,
 where, later, the old Troup Factory, the first cotton mill in LaGrange,
 was built in 1845. Soon after the founding of West Point (old Franklin),
 in 1831, Mr. Huguley moved to "New Alabama", as recently opened territory
 was called; and he settled in Chambers County in the vicinity now known
 as the Huguley Community. Here he acquired a large tract of fertile
 land, which he soon converted into a profitable plantation;
 and , in time, he became one of the largest and wealthiest land owners in
 this section, owning more than 100 slaves.
 Having forseen the inevitable defeat of the Confederate armies, George
 Huguley began preparing for tomorrow. A year before the Surrender, he
 had sold his cotton for high prices; and when Fort Tyler fell, seven days
 after Appromattox, Mr. Huguley took most of his cotton and hid it deep in
 his plantation, knowing the Federal Government would attempt to
 confiscate everything of value in the South that had been produced by slave labor. Before the federal agents had arrived in this section, Mr.
 Huguley had rushed most of his cotton by wagons to Augusta and Savannah,
 where he sold it to greedy eastern agents for mor than a dollar a pound.
 What happened- - - - - or what didn't happen! - - to the cotton remainin
 at the Huguley gin is told by George Lanier, a grandson of George
 Huguley, Mr. Lanier's recalling boyhood memories of the reminiscences of
 his mother.
 "I can recal", says Mr. Lanier, "hearing my mother say that, immediately after the war, when the carpetbaggers were raiding the south, they came by the plantation of her father; and in the name of the Government they
 demanded possession of the cotton that was lying on the platform of the gin. at the time of this visit from the carpetbaggers, my grand-father,
 George Huguley, was not at home.
 "His wife, being notified of what was going on, summoned to her aid one
 of the strongest ex-slaves on the plantation. This faithful Negro, with
 an axe in his hand, followed his mistress to the gin." "Then my grandmother said defiantly to the Federal agents: "Don't you
 touch one bale of this cotton! If you do, this Negro will kill you. He
 and the others here on this plantation will do anything I ask of them!
 Whereupon the carpetbaffers took a hasty departure."
 George Huguley managed to get the remainder of his cotton to the Atlantic
 seaboard, where he sold it for a fancy price. But Mr. Huguley knew that
 there were scores of people in this community and surrounding areas who
 had not been so fortunate as he. He knew that the South was wrecked, and
 that there were hundreds who were destitute. He also knew that, before
 the war, cotton manufacturing had begun to prosper in the South.
 Therefore within a year, early in 1866, the Alabama-Georgia Manufacturing
 Company was manufacturing osnaburg at the Huguley Mill in present
 Riverview. Mr. Huguley's venture no doubt spurred Elisha Trammell,
 Lucius Beall Lovelace, Major N. L. Atkinson, James McClendon, W. C.
 Darden, James Reed, Benjamin Thomas and John D. Johnson to organize th
 Chattahooche Manufacturing Company, which began operations a few months
 after the Huguley Mill started up. But the credit of founding the first


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